PANDAS & Lyme: My Recovery and 8 Years of Misdiagnoses

Posts tagged ‘Anxiety’

Minor Symptoms, Major Anxieties

I still can’t believe I went so far from home for this internship…

A few weeks ago, I took a huge leap of faith, packed up my bags, and got on a plane to the big city. As the skyline came into view, the realization of what I was doing for the next two months hit me a hundred times harder than the impact of touching down on the runway. I was about to start a prestigious internship, living in a part of the country where I’d never been and working with people whom I’d never met. What had I gotten myself into?

I’ve been doing so much better over the last couple of months or so, but I’ve noticed that there have been some small things that continue to creep in and make me feel “different” from everyone else. These minor symptoms become major anxieties because I’m still holding my breath and not seeing my health for what it is—that I’m 95% better and no one would ever know the hell I’ve been through without me telling them.

For example, I have small involuntary movements which, even in my best times of remission, have never completely gone away for more than a few days at a time. I always wonder, does everyone notice the twitches? Do people think there’s something wrong with me?

And of course, there are the food issues. There haven’t always been many “safe” foods available here, so I’m pretty sure some colleagues have noted that I seem to eat very little yet run a whole lot. (No one knows how I binge in secret, which means no weight loss.) Have people figured out I have an eating disorder? Do they think I’m vain for obsessing about food and exercise so much?

Perhaps most telling of all is that I have a mild form of “face blindness,” or prosopagnosia. Some people are born with the condition, but for everyone else, it’s caused by a brain injury—or in my case, PANS. Prosopagnosia means I have a terrible time recognizing faces, so I often get people mixed up and sometimes don’t know who people are. I rely on hairstyles, voices, and body shapes, instead of faces themselves, to tell strangers apart. Still, I’ve managed to embarrass myself a couple of times by mixing up similar-looking coworkers. Do people think I’m really inattentive—or worse, that I’m some kind of freak?

Although face blindness, involuntary movements, and food rituals certainly have a negative impact on life still, I feel like the main way that PANS affects me now is what it’s done to my confidence. I used to not care what people thought of me, but for the last three years, I’ve worried that people can sense that I’m “different” and cannot see past my symptoms to find who I really am.

When PANS was at its worst, the plethora of symptoms affected every part of my life and made me feel like nothing more than a heap of crippling psychiatric and neurological problems. With the way PANS literally steals yourself from you and takes over your mind and body, each moment can be your worst nightmare. So after living this awful dream day after day after day, for multiple years, it’s hard to open my eyes and realize that I’ve finally awoken—and even harder to not worry that the nightmare will recur.

Even though I’m more or less well now, I’m still afraid of seeming crazy, of saying nonsense, of spacing out in the middle of giving a presentation, of having uncontrollable tics, of not being able to understand what I read, and of being underestimated because of my illness; I worry about concealing imperceptible symptoms and symptoms that are no longer here, because my anxiety doesn’t know that I’m okay now.

Nevertheless, when I asked one of my new friends if she’d noticed any of my symptoms, she told me I seemed like the healthiest person in the group—that I’m “glowing” with health. Truth be told, I’m actually performing extremely well at my job, and I have a large group of friends who apparently like me a lot. Even if anyone does think I’m “different,” it hasn’t stopped them from befriending me and respecting my work.

I may still have some symptoms, but they’re not preventing me from doing anything that I want to be doing, so how can I complain? Maybe someday soon, if I stay well long enough, I’ll be able to exhale and see for myself that I’m really as well as I am.

The Truth About My PANS Recovery

PANS can mean losing your very self… And then trying to get it back in recovery.

The other day, while filling out forms for an appointment, I froze, as I came upon the medical history section. How could I even begin to explain it all? Moreover, how could I fit everything on two little lines?

I somehow managed to list all three of my psychiatric medications, along with the five antibiotics I rotate in my Lyme protocol. Hesitantly, I also listed Lyme disease as a current medical condition, mostly to explain the many antibiotics. But then I paused… Do I really need to list PANS, too?

You see, in all three of the major PANS exacerbations I’ve had in the last ten years, I’ve not only dealt with crippling OCD, anxiety, depression, cognitive problems, and movement disorders, but I’ve lost my very self; I’ve felt and acted like a different person that no one recognized. Contrarily, I’ve recently started to feel like my “normal” self. Does that mean I’m better now?

During my worst times, it was like an invisible wall had shut me inside my own tormented mind. I was trapped within my own thoughts, yet completely outside myself. I saw the world, but I wasn’t part of it. Life had lost its colors, and my days ran together in a blurry mass of the black and white of OCD, and the gray of depression. My body was alive, but the person I had been was gone.

While each episode could start overnight and suddenly take me away, coming back to life post-IVIG has always been such a long and slow process that I’ve never been able to pinpoint an exact time when I’ve returned; I slowly regain myself and watch symptoms die away at a glacial pace, and it eventually occurs to me that I’m fully present again.

By now, it’s been over a year since I caught Lyme disease and suffered my third major PANS episode, ten months since the high-dose IVIG that was meant to bring me back, and five months since I began Lyme treatment. And recently, I realized that I was finally myself again. So can I legitimately say I have PANS anymore? For that matter, do I really have Lyme?

I know too many people with PANS who are home-bound, yet here I am, driving around town and trying to meet new people just for fun. I know some with Lyme who can’t get out of bed, but I just ran my second half-marathon (albeit five days after an 103º fever herx). I know kids who would love to be able to go to school but cannot because they are too cognitively impaired from their illness—and then there’s me, with eight semesters of college completed and a 3.94 GPA. I know PANS and Lyme kids who literally want to die and can’t even bear to think about tomorrow, but I’m sitting here looking forward to a summer internship. How can I be sick?

Unfortunately, just because I’m “back” and appearing to function quite well doesn’t mean I’m better—far from it. My anxiety has gotten so bad that I’m now taking the anti-psychotic Seroquel each night to help make it manageable. Plus, I remain on Lamictal and Wellbutrin for other psychiatric symptoms. Most days, I continue to have a hard time walking, and I have so many (small) involuntary movements that I physically cannot be still. Oh, and quite often, my speech comes out nonsensical.

There was a time when I was that kid who wanted to die and couldn’t even manage to go outside—indeed, my severe anorexia meant I was slowly dying last summer. Now, I’m the walking wounded; I still get around and can put up a good fight, but I’m not completely okay, either. I have myself again, but I also have plenty of symptoms.

And so, I added “PANS/Autoimmune Encephalitis” right along with “Lyme Disease” on that form the other day. I’m so grateful to have returned to myself, but I’m seeing that healing a brain and an immune system is a long and arduous process (and there’s always the possibility of a flare or relapse). I await the day when my symptoms are finally gone.  So despite my apparently high level of functioning, yes, I really do still have PANS and Lyme—even though I also have myself again.

Why I Almost Quit Lyme Treatment

I pretty much take an entire pharmacy every day

 

On Thursday morning, I woke up and immediately knew something was very wrong. My whole body ached. I had an awful headache. I was dizzy. I was too nauseous to even think about food or water. It was that familiar set of symptoms that meant one thing: I was in for a terrible Lyme herx.

The last two weeks of symptoms flashed in my mind… The severe anxiety that gave me a panic attack over leaving the house. The lack of concentration and mental energy that meant falling behind in school. The incessant partial seizures that made me nervous every time I stood up to walk. I hadn’t even been in such bad shape when I started being treated for Lyme in December.

What are these doctors doing to me? Why am I putting up with this? I realized that morning that my treatments were only making me sicker.

As I eventually got to the kitchen, I sat there and stared down my antibiotics—the perpetrators of these all-too-frequent Herxheimer reactions that seem to be slowly ruining my life.

I can’t do this anymore…

I stopped my Lyme protocol for several days, because the thought of getting any worse than I already was seemed unbearable. Last semester, my quality of life, even if I still had PANS flares, had been much better. I’ve missed so many days of class this semester, thanks to herxes that leave me too weak and sick to get out of bed. I thought if I took a break from my protocol, maybe life could go back to how it was before.

But unfortunately, my strong reactions to the treatments show that they’re killing off a lot of bacteria—in other words, my misery is proof that I need to keep going.  And last summer, Lyme disease attacked my heart and nervous system, and there are still spirochetes in my brain—who knows what they could do to me over time?

I can’t quit. Whether I like it or not, this disease is trying to take my life, and if I want to live, I have to fight back.

After a couple of days of lying around the house and feeling terrible from the herx, plus a lot of kicking and screaming, I finally accepted this battle I’ve been given. I shed more than a few tears, finally realizing that I may have another year or more of Lyme treatment before I’m cured. I felt anger and rage that I’m spending my twenties in a health crisis—after already having PANS for a decade. But I’m channeling that anger into a will to fight to get better.

I almost quit treatment because I was tired of feeling worse. I kept going because I wanted to live.

Why I’m Working through PANS

Can someone with PANS/Lyme keep up in a competitive environment?

A couple weeks ago, I was elated to find out that I’d been accepted for a summer internship!  This wasn’t just any job offer, but a highly competitive internship that I’ve worked towards and dreamed about for years. It seemed so surreal that this door had finally opened!

Unfortunately, I quickly came crashing back into reality when I remembered how ill I’ve been lately. At the moment, my anxiety is so out-of-hand that it’s not clear how I’ll finish the semester, because I can hardly even start my assignments.  On top of this, I can barely walk without a mini-seizure causing my legs to collapse, and I’m having a difficult time speaking coherently.  If I’m this dysfunctional right now, how can I possibly hold down a job in a few more weeks?

I have had some really good days lately, too, but even then, I still live with a sense that my illness is following me like the bogie man, ready to jump out and attack at any moment. To me, one of the cruelest aspects of PANS is its unpredictability. Just as I think I’m healthy and in the clear, suddenly, it can overtake me again. I live on egg shells because I never know when PANS will strike next. I fear that I’m always one cold or infection or exposure to Strep away from the brink of insanity.

Even if I improve in the next few weeks, how can I do an internship this summer if I might lose myself any day, without warning?

Nevertheless, after ten years of PANS, I’m a race horse kicking at the gates; for too long, this illness has kept me locked up as I’ve watched everyone else take off without me. Now, this internship is my chance to tear through the doors and speed down the track. I have a life to live, and I’m not about to let PANS stop me.

So I accepted the offer.

At this point, I’m more terrified than excited, but you know what? I refuse to not try just because of the bad things that might happen. I know I may have to pace myself and guard my health more than the other interns. Even so, because I’ve become accustomed to the uncertainty of never knowing how long my symptoms will be in remission, I work very hard on every day that I’m able—apparently with higher-quality results than many other healthy people. If I’m well this summer, then I believe I will not only get through the job, but I will pass everything with flying colors.

I’ve long come to terms with the inevitable uncertainty of my condition, and day-by-day, I’ve been working through the difficulties and moving towards recovery—albeit much slower than I’d like at times. But now, I’m determined to keep working through PANS this summer, as this internship leads me toward my dreams.

Why I Look Forward to Tomorrow

Being symptom-free was like waking up from a ten-year slumber

Being symptom-free was like waking up from a ten-year slumber

Last week, as I climbed into bed and turned out the lights, I experienced something very strange: I realized I was looking forward to my tomorrow. In that moment, it struck me that after ten years of PANS, I couldn’t recall the last time I was truly excited about waking up for another day.

It’s not that I haven’t looked forward to anything in life for all these years—there have been plenty of better times when I’ve been excited about a particular event or a single aspect of a day. But rarely, if ever, have I looked forward to simply living.

Much of the time, I don’t live, so much as I merely survive. I’ve achieved great things in spite of my illness, but my victories are always shrouded in a cloud of depression and anxieties—I may do “normal” things, but no one knows how many obstacles I face in the process. In good times, PANS trails behind me like a shadow, reminding me that any day, it could come back and envelop me—which causes an unconscious sense of dread for each day to come.

But for a few days last week, that shadow was gone. While I still had a few tics here and there (and ongoing food challenges), I otherwise didn’t notice my symptoms at all. I had a mental clarity that I hadn’t experienced in at least a decade—no more depression, no more anxiety, no more ADHD, no more cognitive problems, no more brain fog—just clear thinking and happiness. It felt like waking up from a ten-year slumber.

Amazingly, it just so happens that this week marks the six-month anniversary of my third high-dose IVIG. I’ve always been told that it’s usually 4-6 months (and sometimes up to a year) before the full effects of IVIG kick in, so it seems that I’m right on target.

Unfortunately, the “awakening” I experienced a few days ago didn’t last: I’ve since had another herx reaction from my Lyme treatments, which has brought back the brain fog and depression, along with feeling like I have a bad case of the flu. It’s terribly painful to have had a taste of normalcy and good health, only to be dragged back into the mud of PANS and Lyme.

Nevertheless, I’m trying to look on the bright side and realize that herxing, by definition, means the Lyme bacteria are dying, and I’m getting better. Moreover, having experienced this latest bout of remission—the first time I’ve looked forward to life in a decade—gives me great hope for the future.  If I can have five days of remission like that, then why should I not believe I can someday be that healthy all the time?

Now I look forward to tomorrow because I have reason to believe and hope that I’m on my way towards forever beating PANS and Lyme.

Why I’m Struggling through College… For the 8th Time

With PANS and Lyme, homework isn't the only thing making college so difficult.

With PANS/Lyme, homework is far from the only reason college is so difficult…

It was with a truckload of emotions that I pulled up to my apartment last Monday night, before my eighth semester of college. While being at school means seeing my friends again and keeping busy with interesting things, it also usually means grinding myself into pieces as I try to get all the required work done in the midst of PANS and Lyme. College isn’t easy for anyone, but trying to do it with these chronic illnesses can make it a hundred times worse.

I thought I was looking forward to being back, but as I began to unpack, I was overcome with dread and despair, and I had a meltdown. This wasn’t a PANDAS-triggered flare meltdown—this was the meltdown of someone who is simply beyond tired of having to function with a debilitating illness. Yes, it’s important to realize that not every emotional outburst from someone with PANS is caused by brain inflammation—we’re human just like everyone else.

Even though I made straight-A’s last semester and seemed totally together on the outside, honestly, I was a train wreck most of the time. I easily spent (and still spend) two or more hours a day on food-related rituals and obsessions. I restricted until I became too weak to walk to class without losing my breath. And then I binged a lot… And purged. (How I got to that point after not eating because I feared vomiting so much a couple years ago is beyond me.)

As if an eating disorder weren’t bad enough, I had one horrendous PANS flare that almost hospitalized me, and several others that left me unable to get any work done. Sometimes, it took me eight hours to get over my anxiety about starting an assignment, and then another four to complete it. I often slept only two hours and lived off caffeine.

If last semester were the only one that was so difficult, maybe I wouldn’t have been so upset about the idea of getting through another semester. But truth be told, most of my semesters have been almost as bad—and some worse…

Freshman year, I was at least halfway asleep most of the time, which resulted in a narcolepsy misdiagnosis (hence my being the “Dreaming” Panda). Sophomore year, I was often half-crazy, because I had terrible PANS flares every week or two, and in between them, I was barely living. Junior year, I was almost okay… Until I got Lyme disease and anorexia in the spring.

Would you want to be back at college if this was how it’d gone so far?

Yet as hard as college has been, I decided this week to gird my loins and do whatever it takes to finish—even though it means enrolling in 16 credits now so that I can graduate in December. The thought of staying beyond then is simply too much to handle.

Indeed, these first three days of school have been anything but easy so far. I have more homework than ever before, and more pressure to do well now that I’m a senior. And on the second day of class, I had a Herxheimer reaction that put me on the couch and shut me up inside my apartment all weekend—but thankfully, I was actually able to get some work done.

But you know what? Even though college with Lyme and PANS is difficult, I’m just glad that my Lyme treatments have made me well enough to be here trying at all. A month ago, my family and I were looking into residential care, so I consider it a gift to even be able to struggle through school again.

At the start of every semester, my parents have tried to encourage me by saying, “Maybe this semester will be better than the last one.” Much of the time, it hasn’t been, but my Lyme treatment is most definitely relieving my symptoms already. And so, this time, I’ll join in their optimism:

Maybe this semester will be better than all the other tough semesters…

The Puppy Is Alive!

Puppy

With another semester of college done, I can truly say I thrived under exceedingly difficult circumstances. Several months ago, I vowed to stop trying to live up to the expectations people had for me as a top student in my program, but instead, I ended up exceeding them with yet more awards and accolades—I got all A’s, again. Frankly, I’m not sure how I do it…

But unfortunately, instead of coming home and taking a victory lap, I staggered across the finish line of the semester and face-planted with a flare. The drive home was interrupted by my first panic attack in a year, and the moment my mom pulled into a gas station, I got out of the car and started yelling, bawling, threatening to run off, and ticking violently, surely appearing psychotic to everyone around us. Somehow, my mom eventually coaxed me back into the car, but I spent the rest of the trip completely tormented by thoughts that tried to tell me I wanted to die.

In typical PANS fashion, I’ve been falling hard and fast into a very dark place. The day I got home, I could do nothing but lie on the couch doing mindless activities on the computer to distract myself from the tormenting, looping thoughts. But at some point one evening, my concentration on an iPad game lapses, and the thoughts come rushing back.

My mom looks over and notices the tear trickling down my face. She knows what’s coming…

Indeed, I can’t hold it in any longer. I burst out into a rant about how fat I am, my latest 20-cookie binge, the shin splints keeping me from running, the torment in my brain, the dreams I’ll never achieve thanks to PANS, and the hopelessness of what seems like an endless cycle of relapse and recovery.

“I shouldn’t have come home. All I do is make you all unhappy!” I finally blurt out, upon seeing my mom join me in crying.

She tries to remind me of the joy I also bring and says her tears are because she can’t help but hurt for me. She tells me to imagine I had to watch a puppy being tortured, and that I’m that puppy to her. I mutter yet another suicidal remark before my dad interjects:

“It’s not any better if the puppy is dead.”

I know he’s right—I really do.  But sometimes, this makes me feel even more hopeless because I know I’m stuck living in a miserable condition for the time being.  However, some part of me deep down knows that permanent PANS is not my destiny, so that’s why I choose to keep enduring flares like this one and not give up.

“We’re going to see the Lyme doctor this week,” my mom reminds me, trying to give me a ray of hope that we’ll find something to get me better. But you know what? I’m sick of being a human guinea pig while doctors figure out how to treat a disease that, despite increasing research, is still poorly understood. I’m tired of enduring what sometimes feels like two years of medical experiments with no conclusive results.

But alas, this puppy is not dead. It may be tortured, but the torment will not kill it—not physically, not mentally. And historically speaking, whenever the pain comes, it soon ends with the right intervention.

Sometimes, when I’m in a place like this, I try to not think about my “real” self—the person I am when the tendrils of torment and despair are not constricting me. I don’t like to realize how many things I’m missing out on or to understand how much I’m no longer able to do. But truth be told, I somehow accomplished everything I wanted this semester, and I even ended up with more friends than ever before.  Life isn’t always as hard and painful as it is at the moment.

So it’s true: this puppy is still very much alive and fighting. And my successful semester proves that I’m determined to someday win the war with PANS.

How PANS Really Feels

PANS is an explosion inside my brain

PANS is an explosion inside my brain

“Mom, I want to die!” I burst into the living room screaming, a look of sheer terror in my eyes.

“Please… Help me!” I plead as I crumple into a heap on the sofa, wailing and yelling at the top of my lungs.

I’m being tortured—a sinus infection is causing my immune system to attack my brain, triggering sudden and severe mental illness. This is just another evening in the life of someone with PANS/PANDAS who’s having a flare…

The only way to describe the torment I feel in these moments of a severe flare is that it’s like someone has jabbed a knife into my brain, but the pain is mental instead of physical. It’s like fingernails scraping against a chalkboard, and the chalkboard is my soul being whittled away. It’s like a bomb going off inside my mind, scattering my thoughts and setting my brain on fire. I’m no longer present, but I’m aware enough to not be spared the grief of losing myself. It’s mental agony so intense that, in those hours, I’d rather die than continue to endure it indefinitely.

Shockingly, just a few days before, I wasn’t unlike any other college senior—I was happy, full of life, a bit stressed from midterms, yet looking forward to all that was in store for me. Killing myself was not something on my agenda. But then, I caught a cold, and I soon noticed myself becoming forgetful and struggling to think clearly. A few days later, I started refusing food out of fear (not from a lack of appetite). Then, I suddenly began hearing looping thoughts telling me that I wanted—and needed—to die. The most basic tasks were impossible—simply putting my shoes on was mentally overwhelming. I didn’t care about anything and was completely disengaged with life.  Every few hours, I’d suddenly become gripped with a wave of terror for no reason, and I’d start crying uncontrollably because of the severity of the mental pain.

Within a week’s time, I’d lost my mind.

My parents had come to stay with me for fall break, believing they would bring me home for the rest of the semester. The usual high-dose steroid regimen I take for flares had failed miserably—even a high-dose Solumedrol IV drip did nothing. However, one night, in a last-ditch effort to rescue me from the brink of insanity, we pulled out what was left of an old Azithromycin prescription, and I started taking it (with my doctors’ approval). Sometimes, if steroids don’t help PANS symptoms, it’s a good indication there’s an unresolved infection. I was already on penicillin, but plenty of bacteria can’t be killed by it.

With three days of Azithromycin, I felt no change—though my parents claimed I was starting to look a little less tormented. And then, one day, I started doing homework. Then I ate real meals. Before long, I felt engaged with the world again. By the fifth day, it was as if the whole incident had never happened; I was 100% back to where I was before.

People often ask me what it’s like to have PANS—to survive the mental anguish of flares and then in the good times, to live with the knowledge that it could all recur any day. But the truth is that, to me, there’s nothing like losing, and subsequently, finding your mind again to make you appreciate the goodness of all the little things in life that so many of us take for granted. When I have a bad flare like this one, PANS makes me want to die, because it turns my brain against me. On all the other days, PANS makes me want to live as fully as possible, because I know tomorrow is so uncertain, and I want to enjoy all the good things in my life while I can.

Living with PANS has never been easy—in fact, it often feels impossible, but now that this flare is over, I’m grateful to be alive and well and back in class, and I’m grateful for Azithromycin.  And of course, I’m grateful for parents and doctors who don’t give up on helping me live even when my brain tricks me into wishing that they would.

Why I’m Not Living up to Your Expectations

Sometimes, you have to clear your own path

Sometimes, you have to clear your own path

Last semester, when I received special recognition for some of my work at school, my college experience transformed. I quickly went from being the quiet kid with few friends, to the student that everyone in my department knew about. People who’d barely spoken to me before were now congratulating me and asking for advice. And I finally got invited to social events.

While I enjoyed my upgraded status, with my success came a side effect: unreasonably high expectations.

No one ever said to me outright that they expected me to be the best, but I could feel certain expectations when I walked into a room sometimes: peers assuming I knew far more than I did, professors scrutinizing my work more carefully, and outsiders urging me to do whatever it took to get into the “top” grad schools. While I’d thrived on this pressure at the time, after being so ill this summer, I found myself dreading showing up at school this semester while still struggling so much. I hated the possible humiliation that could come from having everyone find out I couldn’t even handle a full course load anymore—that I went from being “at the top” to barely being enrolled at all. I hated the idea of not living up to what my professors and peers had once expected of me.

For the first few days back at school this semester, I treated my part-time status and my now-delayed graduation as shameful secrets that I had to conceal. I walked through the halls pretending to be just as fine and happy and productive as ever so that I could fool myself and everyone else into thinking nothing had changed since last semester. I wished more than anything that I still had my old life where I could meet everyone’s high expectations.

But one night this week, after countless hours of struggling to even start any work, I went home and bawled my eyes out in frustration over the difficulty of writing a one-paragraph assignment. Before I had the flu in March, I could’ve done this homework in under an hour with little anxiety, but now, my brain is a mess, and the simplest things are exhausting. That night, reality came crashing down: I can’t possibly live up to anyone’s expectations anymore. And more importantly, I don’t have to.

I decided that night that I had to forge a new path for myself to get to my dreams in my own way, rather than the way others expected me to go.  I found so much freedom in releasing old expectations. Just because my path will be different from what everyone expected, why does that mean it’ll be worse than what “should’ve” been?

And really, who cares what anyone else thinks and how they choose to go through college themselves? It doesn’t matter, because we’re all on our own journeys with our own obstacles, so there’s no point trying to live up to the expectations of people who don’t understand my life. Yet truth be told, when I finally started talking about what happened this summer and my ongoing difficulties, I was showered with nothing but love and support—even from the professors who had been the hardest on me in the past. It turns out that most people are far less critical than I thought, so I might as well do what’s best for me instead of what I imagine people expect.

This road of relapse, slow recovery, a lighter course load, and new expectations is not the one I would’ve chosen, but it’s the one I’ve been given. So I’ve stopped asking why such difficult things have happened to me, and I’ve learned to accept and bear up to whatever lies in front of me. I’ve figured out that life with a chronic illness requires resilience, and resilience requires accepting life for what it is instead of dwelling on what I wish it were. Resilience is letting go of old expectations and moving forward as best I can—even if I must crawl towards my dreams instead of running.

Why I Won’t Eat

You know it's a problem when you feel guilty about eating an apple.

You know it’s a problem when you feel guilty about eating an apple.

With this latest flare, I’ve been struggling with an eating disorder again.  Restricted food intake is one of the two major diagnostic criteria for PANS, so my new obsession is nothing unusual.  In fact, this is the third time in my life that I’ve faced an eating disorder: the first was when I was nine or ten and the second was in 2014.

This time, my eating problems began suddenly, a few days before a bad virus three months ago.  There have since been periods when I ate without guilt and felt no need to restrict, but at other times I’ve suddenly become completely tormented by food—classic PANS.  My eating disorder is, in essence, mental and physical torture.

PANS-related anorexia isn’t necessarily like typical Anorexia Nervosa, however. In my case, I’m fully aware that I’m too skinny, but I’m compelled to continue my restricting anyway. In the past, I’ve also restricted because I was convinced that virtually all food would make me throw up, so the only thing I would eat was one particular kind of fruit smoothie.  Now, I’m afraid eating will make me gain weight and lose control of myself, so I’m obsessed with consuming a certain number of calories each day.

Living with my PANDAS-triggered eating disorder is like watching myself drive towards a cliff and not being able to stop, even though I’m the one behind the wheel. I know my behavior is dangerous, but I feel compelled to continue anyway.  I know I’m losing an unsafe amount of weight, and I know it’s bad to not eat. But the anxiety caused by eating any more is so intense that I would rather continue to restrict. Even worse, there’s some part of me that derives a twisted form of pleasure from not eating.

Sometimes, I also still enjoy the taste of food, but I often feel bad about it afterwards. In my mind, no matter how little I’ve eaten, I’ve always eaten too much, so I’m always guaranteed to gain weight. I know what my doctors will say about me weighing only 96 pounds, and I know it’s dangerous to have lost 13% of my initial, healthy weight. But for some reason, I just feel like I need to keep going, and the torment surrounding this urge is too strong to resist.

All day long, I’m doing calorie math in my head, planning my meals for days. I feel guilty about what I ate, and unsatisfied with what I didn’t—PANDAS tells me I’ve never eaten too little.  I’m beyond exhausted all the time, and I fear it’s because I’m malnourished.

I never imagined I’d become so ill again. I never thought I’d take things this far. Sometimes, I don’t feel like I have a problem, because I believe so strongly that I’m still in control of my eating disorder. But part of me knows that while I thought restricting would give me control over my body, it’s instead made me lose all control I had left.

On some level, I find comfort in the “control” I think I have through restricting, but deep down, I know I can’t continue like this. Deep down, all I really want is to be able to enjoy food again without any guilt and to be strong enough to run.

I’m tired of food controlling my life, and I’m tired of feeling so bad, so I’ve decided to start outpatient treatment for my eating disorder. And of course, I’m going back to see my PANDAS doctor to address the brain inflammation that triggered it in the first place.  Finally, I’m going to have the Igenex labs run to test for Lyme and co-infections (in addition to a couple dozen other blood tests).

Although I’m scared to stop restricting, I’m so ready to be free and strong.  I’ve decided that, somehow, I’m going to eat with pleasure again. 

One Wrong Step and…

With PANS, you never know what step might pull you into the ground...

With PANS, you never know what step might pull you into the ground…

I know I said I’d start a series on the different treatments I’ve tried, but I’m pausing to tell you why I haven’t been able to post in several weeks…

I caught some terrible virus and have been having symptoms again.  As a result, I got behind in school, so I’ve had to use all my time to get on top of things again.

As you know, when someone with PANDAS gets sick, it never just means sitting in bed and sipping on chicken soup for a few days. In the past, getting sick could literally make me lose my mind. For example, what should have been a mild case of mono during my freshman year of college turned my immune system against my brain, leaving me suicidal, anorexic, and unable to walk.

So you can imagine my fear when I woke up a couple weeks ago with my whole body in pain and a pounding headache. I was so weak that I could barely sit up. Was this the beginning of the end, all over again?

While I didn’t go crazy, I’ve certainly had a rough time as a result of this most recent illness. For a week, I had a ten-second attention span, making it take four times as long to get any of my homework done. I suddenly got it into my head that I needed to start restricting again, and I’ve lost a few pounds. When I was well enough to go back to class, I continually wrote letters out of order when taking notes and struggled to figure out how to fix my spelling errors. Things were making me cry for no reason. One night, I couldn’t sleep because I was afraid that if I did, my heart might stop and then I’d die.

In the midst of this, I had a dream that I was walking on a road with a friend when out of nowhere, I dropped into a mud sinkhole and became submerged up to my shoulders. My friend had stepped in the same place and not fallen in, but what should have been a puddle nearly drowned me.

“This is what happens when I get sick,” I explained. “I need you to pull me out.”

Just as she reached out her arm, I woke up, my heart racing.

I haven’t been able to stop thinking about the dream, because it’s true for pretty much everyone with PANS. During times of remission, we walk around the world just like everyone else, minding our own business, but then, when the wrong virus or infection comes along, we’re swallowed up by the ground beneath our feet. Most people can emerge from a cold with nothing but a runny nose that lasts a few days, while the same virus could literally drive someone with PANS into insanity. And the worst part is that when you’re busy living your life, you know that any of your steps could be the one that sucks you into the ground.

But thankfully, this time, my friend Prednisone once again pulled me out, and now I’m not having symptoms anymore. I believe there’s a reason why, in my dream, the mud only went up to my shoulders instead of totally burying me—nowadays, my flares never completely take away who I am in the way they used to. As bad as this latest one sounds, it’s nothing compared to how my flares used to be. So while it’s been discouraging to have had a recurrence of symptoms, I’m reminding myself that the mud was unable to swallow me up to my head like it once did.

So readers, I’m fine now, and I’ve finally gotten caught up with school. Next week, I’ll actually be starting my series on treatments, beginning with a post on antibiotics, so stay tuned!

PANS: Certainty of Uncertainty

To me, one of the most difficult parts of recovering from PANS is how, just when you think you’re done having symptoms, your life can change again in a day. Sometimes, I feel like with PANS, the only certainty you have is the uncertainty of the course of the illness.

Last week, I’d been doing great in every way imaginable, but on Monday, I started having tics again. At first, I didn’t think much of it because, sometimes, I have a few here or there, and then they go away. Unfortunately, this time they were the most pronounced they’d been since the summer, and I was even having vocalizations again.

By the next day, I was constantly sniffing and grunting and making all sorts of strange noises and doing repetitive movements with my head and arms. At times, I could barely finish a sentence without being interrupted by a vocal tic.

But PANS had even worse things coming to me…

The day after that, while walking home to my apartment (and sniffing all the way there), I felt my legs starting to get heavy. I tried to keep walking normally, but they would stop responding to my brain. All of a sudden, my knees were buckling every few steps, just like they used to do all the time when I was at my worst.

Over two days, I’d gone from being 100% functional to being physically disabled and having severe tics. Why was all of this happening to me? Was this the beginning of a relapse? Would I be spending this spring break getting another IVIG, just like last year?

Most of the time now, I don’t dwell on my illness or feel sorry for myself. But this week, it hit me all over again just how unfair it is to have a disease that can leave you handicapped without warning. No one deserves to live with this possibility hanging over their head all the time.

Over the last two years of recovery, I’ve often been in denial of my illness. I used to blame myself for every flare and every tic and every obsession and every treatment I needed to have. I never told anyone, but I always wondered if maybe, there was somehow a part of me that didn’t want to get better, and that this part of me was making me continue to need treatment. I felt bad for putting my family through what they went through because, somehow, it was my fault.

Deep down, I always knew that I didn’t want to be stuck with my illness, but by blaming myself anyway, I could claim some control over the disease. If I’d been responsible for preventing my recovery, then, at any point, I could’ve decided to stop having symptoms. I didn’t have to deal with the uncertainty of having no control—or with the truth that I was doing everything in my power to get better, yet I was still sick.

But there’s nothing like involuntary movements and partial paralysis attacks to prove to you that you have no control over PANS—and that even if you felt certain you were well, you can’t be certain you won’t have symptoms again.  This week, I was faced with the reality that my wishes to get better (or my false suspicions of wishing not to) had no bearing on my recovery.

After a few days of being disabled and utterly discouraged, my tics started dying away, and I was able to walk normally. I do consider this a good sign, since I improved without any treatment. However, I’ve since developed new vocal tics (though they only happen occasionally), and I’ve had a couple nights when I could barely walk again. But interestingly and fortunately, I’ve had no cognitive or psychiatric issues, so I’m counting my blessings. For now, I’m just waiting all of this out to see if it goes away.

Still, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t worried about what these reemerging symptoms may or may not mean.

Nevertheless, I’m slowly learning to accept the uncertainty of PANS—and my lack of control over it. I’m okay with not knowing what might happen next, because, through everything, I’ve always had an inexplicable conviction that everything will turn out right in the end. I struggle with my faith sometimes and am not always certain of what I believe, but this one conviction may be among the closest things I feel to certainty… Besides uncertainty.

PANS and Romance: It’s Complicated

Guess who didn't get any roses for Valentine's Day...

Guess who didn’t get any roses for Valentine’s Day…

This Valentine’s Day was my twentieth in a row of being single.

Some of you have noticed my lack of discussion regarding my romance life, and a few have asked whether or not I’ve been able to date while dealing with PANS.

The answer is… It’s complicated.

I’ll soon be twenty-one, but I’ve never had any kind of relationship—unless you count a week in seventh grade.

For years, I was completely okay with my singleness. In fact, I actively didn’t want a boyfriend. There were a few boys in high school who wanted me to be their girlfriend, but I turned them all down.  In college (before I went into remission), I casually dated one guy off and on for a while, but then I stopped before it could become a relationship.

I felt bad for rejecting everyone, but I was always sure I’d done the right thing, because I never had feelings for any of them. I always told myself I was too busy for a boyfriend anyway, but ever since I was twelve, part of me knew there was also something “different” about me…

Whenever I would get together with my girlfriends in high school and they pointed out an attractive male walking by, I had no idea what they were talking about. I didn’t understand their butterflies or flirtation or talk of wanting to kiss. It was like I was missing something in my brain—as if puberty had never happened (though I experienced all the physical changes of puberty).

To make matters worse, I started having sexual intrusive OCD thoughts when I was eleven. They involved men and women and things that are far too explicit to mention, and though I viewed the thoughts as disgusting, I felt responsible for them. So I was sure they meant something about my sexuality, and I felt like the vilest person on the planet.

For a long time, I was confused about my sexuality—or rather, my lack thereof. If I couldn’t tell whether a guy was attractive or not, did that mean I was gay? Yet I knew I didn’t feel anything for women, either. Or was I actually attracted to both because of the intrusive thoughts?

To this day, I don’t experience attraction in the sense that most people think of it.  Sure, sometimes I “notice” a guy, but what I feel is little more than a strong desire to get to know him. I want guys to notice me, too, but there’s never a desire for anything physical.

Until recently, however, I didn’t even notice guys. The first time I ever found myself staring at someone because I thought he was good-looking was a week after my second IVIG—when I was enjoying a short period of near-remission. Since then, I think that a switch is slowly starting to come on in my brain, because this has happened a few more times—but it never once happened in all of the years that my PANS was untreated.

Perhaps I’m a very late bloomer in this area. Perhaps I never felt anything for so many years because it wasn’t the right guy. But personally, I think that PANS has both directly and indirectly affected my ability to experience attraction and to have relationships.

With PANS, the dopamine receptors—known to play an important role in romance—are attacked. Given that I’ve started feeling hints of attraction as the inflammation in my brain has decreased, I don’t find it hard to believe that some of my lack of feelings could’ve been because of the bad antibodies in my brain.

At the same time, I’ve never met another PANDA who also feels how I do (or rather, who doesn’t feel). But I can’t be the only person like this, right?

Of course, was I really going to be thinking about boys last year anyway, when the thought of putting away my laundry once overwhelmed me to the point of running out of my apartment screaming? How can you date when you’re dealing with crippling depression and anxiety? Plus, I’m sure I may once have tried to crush any tiny amount of romantic feelings I had towards anyone for fear of them triggering another intrusive sexual thought.

Nevertheless, this Valentine’s Day, for the first time ever, I felt some pangs of loneliness. While I still don’t experience attraction in the same way as most people, I’m slowly starting to want somebody to share life with—something I was once convinced would never happen. I’m finding that, in all areas of my life, recovery reveals many surprising things about the person I really am.

So who knows? Maybe next Valentine’s day, I’ll post a picture of some roses from my boyfriend…

Flare or Fluke?

How do I know whether or not my struggles are from brain inflammation?

How do I know whether or not my struggles are from brain inflammation?

Yesterday, I humiliated myself in front of the whole class.

Most days now, I feel that I have my mind back—that I can actually think without anxiety and malfunctioning cognitive processes clouding my every thought. But every once in a while, I do something really strange or stupid, and I find myself truly questioning my recovery all over again.

Everyone makes mistakes sometimes, and anyone may occasionally forget words, get distracted, or misunderstand instructions. However, when I do any of those things, I’m immediately taken back to a time when I did them all the time and every day—a time when I had no business even living independently, let alone attempting college. I get more upset than your average person would whenever I slip up, because I never know if my cognitive blip is what a typical person might experience or if it’s a lingering symptom. Every potential symptom sends me into bad memories and fear of history repeating itself.

My embarrassment yesterday happened when I was called up in front of the whole class to demonstrate a new concept on the board (one that I knew very well from studying). I went into auto-pilot, and I made an extremely elementary mistake. Even worse, I didn’t notice until my professor said something and asked me to try again.

“Oh, wow! That was pretty silly,” I said, as the whole class snickered. “What was I thinking?”

To make matters worse, over the last week, I’ve been wondering about and bracing myself for another mild flare. My cognition hasn’t been quite right for a few days. I’ve been really anxious and borderline depressed, and I’m having trouble starting assignments due to anxiety. I’ve had problems taking handwritten notes in class, because even though I know how to spell, my hands frequently write words and letters in the wrong order, or I write the wrong letters all together. And then there’s the fact that my physics textbook was christened with my own tears over the weekend, because I was having such a hard time understanding the material.

But if this is a flare, then why am I not ticking any more than usual? Why is my OCD not getting out-of-control?

Because I’m not flaring. And I’m certainly not stupid. I’m just sleep-deprived and under a tremendous amount of stress, and I’m realizing that college is hard for everybody. Yes, I do have some added PANS difficulties still—the handwriting issues and my legs not listening to my brain after I climb stairs or walk up a hill (more on this later). But who doesn’t get frustrated by physics homework? Who doesn’t have compromised cognition after not sleeping enough? Who doesn’t get anxious when trying to get school work done while awaiting a pending internship offer?

I suppose it’s still possible that I could be about to flare, but I’m choosing to reject that idea. This time, the solution to my struggles is not a Prednisone burst or a switch in antibiotics, but simply going to bed earlier and trying not to beat myself up over what happened in class yesterday.

Over the years, I’ve had to learn how to be sick—how to appear to function, how to live as much as I could, and how to mentally get through the heartbreak of PANS when I couldn’t keep myself together at all. But now, I have to learn how to be healthy—how to deal with embarrassment and challenging classes and stress and all the ups-and-downs of a healthy person’s life.

Surviving Holidays with PANS

The holidays can be a difficult time for PANS patients and families.

The holidays can be a difficult time for PANS patients and families.

Call me the Grinch, but for people with PANS, the holidays aren’t necessarily “the most wonderful time of the year.” For me, the season brings back painful memories of when I was sicker. Plus, symptoms can be more pronounced when contrasted with holiday activities, family gatherings, and Christmas parties.

I love my family and friends, but there are times when I feel like the PANDAS bear is the elephant in the room during visits. Invariably, I end up explaining my illness at every get-together, because my symptoms are forever changing. One time, it’s chorea. Another, it’s inappropriately saying “butt” in the middle of conversations (a vocal tic). On a different occasion, it’s difficulty walking. Understandably, I think it’s hard for some to comprehend how unpredictable and all-consuming PANS can be—especially when I don’t always look very “sick.”

My problem is that I get annoyed when no one bothers to ask how I’m doing, because PANS has been such an enormous part of my life. At the same time, I get annoyed when someone does ask, because despite what this blog may lead you to believe, I’d usually rather talk about college or writing projects or running rather than my challenges. I’m so much more than my illness, and I don’t want to just be the person with “the disease.” Of course, the people who ask almost always genuinely care, so I do appreciate the gesture.

Another difficulty with holidays and PANS is the sensory overload that can so easily happen. Last Christmas, I got so overwhelmed that I had to remove myself from the festivities and take a nap to recharge. My family isn’t that loud, but when you have the sensory sensitivities that are so common with PANS, all of the lights and bright colors and conversation and laughter and activity can be overwhelming and too much to process—no matter how much you’re enjoying yourself.

Worst of all, the first time I experienced depression was just days after Christmas in 2006. I’d been having a lovely time with family that holiday, and then depression came on suddenly. (Although I didn’t have the classic onset of OCD to go with it, I wonder if this was the beginning of PANS.) So to this day, I can’t help but feel a piece of that sadness and darkness every holiday season.

Of course, there are times when PANS and Christmas can be a funny combination—as with my notorious Shower Gel Incident in 2007…

I was twelve and in the middle of a horrible flare, and my mom gave me some nice shower gel. I loved the scent. In fact, I loved it so much that I unscrewed the cap and started to drink it right then and there, beneath the tree. Everyone, including me, was shocked. Though amusing, the story is also unnerving, because it shows how impulsive and irrational PANS had turned me. But I’d rather laugh than cry about it!

Nevertheless, this year, I think I’m in the best health since all of this started so long ago. This year, maybe there will be no elephant in the room at family gatherings, because the bear is leaving me alone—and frankly, I’m no longer embarrassed about what happened to me. I wouldn’t quite say I’m 100% symptom-free, but my present symptoms are so mild that I really don’t feel like I’m sick anymore. I don’t know about you, but I think that’s cause for celebration!

I hope that maybe, next year, I won’t be thinking of bad memories or the difficulties of having PANS around the holidays—I’ll be thinking of Christmastime as an anniversary of when I finally got better—as long as this progress lasts… And as long as I don’t drink more shower gel.


So readers, I’d like to hear from you. How do you deal with the difficult combination of PANS and the holidays? How do you handle awkward family encounters related to PANS? Do you have an “amusing” PANS story related to this season? I’d love to hear, so please feel free to leave a comment.

The Day Recovery Began…

I never imagined what could result from an iPod and a Google search...

I never imagined what could result from an iPod and a Google search…

As I approach final exams this week, I’ve been thinking back to three years ago, when my life changed forever, on December 17th, 2012.

At the time, I was seventeen and in my senior year of high school. I was excelling academically, and people told me I’d have a promising career. I was popular with lots of friends. I felt such a sense of freedom in being an “adult” by learning to drive. I thought the possibilities for my future were endless.

But in an afternoon, my whole world collapsed.

One Saturday at the end of November, out of nowhere, I became convinced I’d committed an unforgivable sin. Suddenly, blasphemous intrusive thoughts constantly filled my mind, and I was consumed with trying to “cancel them out” with silent mental rituals. If I didn’t, I might go to Hell. Overnight, my OCD transformed from mild to an extreme case—though I was still undiagnosed. Little did I know, it was the beginning of a three-year PANS exacerbation.

After that day, my life went from being wonderful to being a living Hell.

Sometimes, I realized how irrational my obsessions were. I would know I was a Christian, and I found it unbelievable to think that a loving God would throw me into Hell over some upsetting thoughts. Other times, I spent every waking moment trying to stop the intrusive thoughts, in constant terror that I was damned and beyond hope.

Sadly, it wasn’t the first time I’d endured this torment. Six years earlier, my OCD had abruptly started in the same way, and since then, it had come and gone. From the time I was eleven, blasphemous intrusive thoughts happened throughout each day, but I eventually learned to pay them no attention. I never told anyone. But suddenly, in 2012, the thoughts took over my life again and couldn’t be ignored, and I felt like they would throw me off the face of the earth at any moment.

Everything came to a head the weekend before my final exams. I couldn’t study, because the thoughts were constant, as were my futile attempts to stop or cancel them. I couldn’t write anything without checking and rechecking to be sure something didn’t have a blasphemous double-meaning. I couldn’t say certain words at all (like “bad” or “evil”), because I feared they would cause another blasphemous thought. It felt like there was a knife lodged into my conscience, tearing down to the core of who I was, and with every thought, it only cut deeper.

On December 17th, after three weeks of mental and spiritual agony, I’d reached the end of my rope. I saw I had to do something besides keep trying to cancel the thoughts, because the torture was only worsening. I stepped back and began to wonder if maybe, just maybe, I had a mental disorder causing it all. Maybe I wasn’t eternally doomed. Maybe none of it was my fault. And then I remembered a Reader’s Digest article from that March which mentioned OCD involved repetitive, unwanted thoughts.

After a Google search and two minutes on the OCD Wikipedia page, I knew.

It’s impossible to describe the hodgepodge of emotions in that moment on December 17th… I was so relieved to discover that my misery had a name—and a hope of ending. I was comforted to realize I wasn’t alone. I was shocked to find out I’d had a serious mental disorder for all those years. I was terrified, because I knew without a doubt that I finally had to speak up and get help. But most of all, I was hopeful, because I knew life could get better.

I wish I could say that everything got easier after that day, but because my family couldn’t convince local doctors to treat me for PANS (which we began to suspect as the underlying cause), December 17th was only the beginning of my fight against various debilitating neurological symptoms that would soon come.

Three years later, it’s been an incredibly long road to get to the freedom I have now (and I’m still fighting in some ways).  I’ve endured months of Exposure-Response Prevention therapy, two IVIG’s, tonsillectomy, lots of antibiotics and other medicines, and drastic lifestyle changes, but PANS no longer runs my life—nor does OCD.

As December 17th comes and goes this week, I can’t help but be grateful for the day, because my discovery and my parent’s research on OCD that followed is what ultimately led to my PANS diagnosis—and eventual recovery.

But more so, December 17th now makes me question… What about all the other people who have OCD but are too scared and confused to get help? How many more cases of PANS will go undiagnosed for eight years because people conceal their OCD so well? My situation was not unique, so I believe more awareness for OCD and PANS among parents, psychologists, doctors, and even children, will bring December 17th faster for more people.

When Strep Attacks…

Once again, I've been taken over by a flare.

Once again, I’ve been taken over by a flare.

Last Friday, I would’ve said I was 100% symptom-free. I went the whole day with no tics or OCD symptoms or depression, and most astonishing of all, I could pay attention in class. My mind was the clearest it’d been in years.

But just as I’d put my life back together after the last flare, it suddenly fell apart.

On Sunday, I began to notice myself having mild short-term memory problems. And then I had a few tics. Monday night, my roommate got sick with an 101º fever, swollen tonsils, and white patches in her throat. Meanwhile, I was becoming more depressed by the minute. A culture of my roommate’s throat on Wednesday confirmed the unthinkable… Strep.

I couldn’t believe my luck (or hers, for that matter). She’d never had a known Strep infection, but she happened to get her first one in college while living with a PANDA who’s been known to lose her mind around the bacteria. Why did this have to happen?

I was sliding ever closer to the cliff from Monday onward, even before I found out my roommate was sick. I began crying for no reason and couldn’t concentrate. My memory was so bad that I forgot how to make a salad I’ve made every day for the last two months, and I couldn’t even remember the topic of a paper I’d been writing all semester. There was no denying that my brain was inflamed again.

I hate how PANDAS is a seemingly endless cycle of grieving the loss of who you are, then rejoicing when treatment resurrects you. When I’m alive, I never know how long I have to live. Will I be in remission for three months, or will it be three days? When I wake up tomorrow, will the infection-of-the-day take me away? I never know.

The worst of all is the sensation of losing myself when I flare; I don’t have symptoms—I no longer have myself. And it’s all the more painful because I’m always completely aware of the fact that I’m mentally dying. I’m wide awake as my heart is torn from my body.

Even so, this flare, though debilitating, has not been nearly as bad as the flares I had before my tonsillectomy. Yes, I lost myself, but I didn’t fall quite as far. I can’t explain it, but this time, the wall that shuts me into myself during a flare wasn’t as thick as it used to be.

Although I was so anxious one day that I ran out of one of my classes and couldn’t come back, I never got to a panic attack like I used to. Although I was extremely depressed to the point that I shut myself into my room for hours, curled up in a fetal position on my bed, and stopped doing my school work (despite normally being a top student), I didn’t become suicidal like I used to. And although I had some trouble walking due to loss of coordination, my legs didn’t go completely limp and paralyzed like they used to.

Objectively, I’m still better than I used to be, even if Strep made me flare. But I’m devastated to have had yet another flare just as I’d recovered from the last one. I’m devastated that my body still makes autoantibodies when exposed to Strep. I’m devastated that I still have PANS at all. How much longer can I keep living with it?

For better or worse, PANS is a part of my life, and though I’m doing everything in my power to push it out, I guess I’ll just have to keep doing Prednisone bursts and antibiotics and all my other treatments and live with it as best I can for now. What choice do I have? I’m beyond exhausted, but I somehow have to believe that life won’t always be this hard. I have to believe that somehow, something good will come out of this illness that still won’t leave me alone.

I wish no one ever got PANS, but I can only hope that what I’m going through and my ability to write about it might positively affect someone else someday—and that it does so even now.

And I have to hope I’ll never again be in such close quarters with Strep in my apartmentfor the sake of my roommate’s throat and for the sake of my own sanity.

Can Hamburgers Stop Flares?

Even in a flare, this silly hamburger label made me laugh!

Even in a flare, this silly hamburger label made me laugh!

I’ll be the first one to admit that there’s pretty much nothing good about having flares or having to take all of the antibiotics and other medications that I take. But, sometimes, in the craziness of it all, I just have to laugh at my circumstances—especially when there’s a hamburger on my bottle of Cefdinir, which I only acquired because of a flare…

After five days of an increased Prednisone dose the other week, I was starting to come out of the mud of depression and brain fog. I almost thought I was okay. My psychiatrist had me double my Wellbutrin to help what was left of the depression, and I was almost hoping that would be enough.

But then the PANDA bear grabbed me again.

When my tics start up, I feel like someone is taking control of my body. I feel like there’s some outside force enveloping me, forcing me to do the movements or make the noises. Sometimes, I can almost feel it on my skin, and that’s rather frightening.

It had been months since I’d had that sensation and since I’d ticked like I did one night this week. Clearly, I’d been exposed to something that my body was reacting to.

A couple of my doctors were highly suspicious that I’d caught Mycoplasma (walking Pneumonia), since it doesn’t respond to the Augmentin I take daily, so I got an Azithromycin Z-pack to treat it. I’d been holding off on starting it for a bit, hoping I could do without it, but when the tics came back and I wasn’t focusing again, I knew I had to do something.

I’m one of those kids who’s usually been classified as a “non-responder” to antibiotics, but given how bad my tics were and the lingering depression and anxiety, I figured it was worth a shot. Plus, I’d been having this weird shortness of breath and a cough, so it wasn’t totally crazy to suspect pneumonia.

To my astonishment, the day after my first dose of Azithromycin, something strange happened: I realized that I wasn’t ticking at all! By the second day, the cloud of despair that I get during flares was also gone. And I was even being productive!

Now that I’ve finished the Z-Pack, I’m doing umbelieveably well taking the hamburger Cefdinir instead of Augmentin XR, and Cefdinir kills Serratia marcescens. (For those of you who are new to my blog, that bacteria once infected my tonsils and probably caused a number of flares.) But since I’d been so depressed for several weeks recently, I hadn’t been cleaning my shower, and of course, there was a huge colony of Serratia growing in one of the corners. Yuck! I’m sure that didn’t help…

I'm 99% sure this was Serratia in my shower...

I’m 99% sure this pink blob in my shower was Serratia

But now, I’ve had someone else clean out the shower with Lysol (to limit my exposure), and I’ve been taking Cefdinir, and I’m doing wonderfully. In fact, I’ve had a few days of feeling 100% and completely symptom-free this week. I don’t know if it was the Azithromycin or the Cefdinir or the Serratia-free shower or all of the above, but no matter what it is, I’m glad for the relief.

Yet I never know how many good days I’m going to have before I flare, so I’m trying to savor and make the most of these good days while I can. I have a bad feeling I’m going to flare again, but I’d like to think it’s just an unfounded fear… Whatever the case, I’ll just keep living as much as I can in the middle of fighting off this crazy disease.

PANDAS is so difficult to go through, but I’ll just keep trying to laugh about the little things—like that silly hamburger—to make the journey more tolerable as I work to find the best treatments.

PANDAS, Described in 1 Word

"Sometimes I just get terrified." 17-year-old me unknowingly describing PANDAS.

“Sometimes I just get terrified,” said 17-year-old me at the beginning of this exacerbation.

To be faced with PANDAS is to have a lot of debilitating symptoms and feelings all at once that, in essence, make you lose who you are. There is much to say about what it feels like to have PANDAS, but if I had to sum up my experience in one word, I would say…

Terror.

Fear has been a reality of my existence ever since my onset at age eleven.  Sometimes, I’ve had specific fears, and other times it was general anxiety. There were times when I felt like I was afraid of everything, as I described so poignantly in a journal from 2009 when I was fourteen:

Worry Is Taking Over My Life-small

I feel like worry is taking over my life… I worry a lot about if I’ll die young. I worry about environmental toxins (like lead). I worry about hearing damage… I worry about getting sick. I worry about what other people think about me. I worry about house fires.

Over time, my fears would slowly fade away (presumably after I fought off whatever infection had caused each flare). But whenever I least expected it, the terror would come back out of nowhere.

When I was seventeen, I suddenly became convinced all over again that I’d committed an unforgivable sin. From then on, everything revolved around making sure I didn’t do something unforgivable that would send me to hell—but instead my OCD become a hell on earth.

I was a caged tiger after that night. I would pace around the house each evening, hoping that somehow it would help me escape the all-consuming terror that trapped me inside myself. The OCD told me I was about to think or say or do something unforgivable, and my mind was constantly full of intrusive blasphemous thoughts that I was sure could damn me.

In order to divert my mind from the horrible terror and despair surrounding the thoughts, I began to write for as many as twelve hours a-day, skipping meals and not leaving the room, to the point where my psychologist became concerned I was in my first manic episode.

The worst thing about PANDAS terror is that it is all in your brain, so there’s no way to make it stop, other than to get treatment or distract yourself. This disease can make you afraid of everything outside of you and afraid of the mind inside of you. It made me do anything—even things I knew made no sense—just to find some relief. Sometimes, those things were OCD compulsions. Other times, it was slamming myself into a wall or trying to jump out a window, just because I felt like I had to.

Sometimes, I used to impulsively run out of the house, because I hoped that maybe, somehow, getting out the door would get me out of the anguishing terror. It’s like having an allergic reaction and itching all over, and all you want to do is get out of your skin to make the feeling stop…  But you can’t.

The need to get out of your mind in a PANDAS flare of terror is one reason this disease can be life-threatening. This is why I used to scream things like, “I want to die!” and why I couldn’t see how life could ever get better, since I was stuck with a mind that terrified me and was no longer my own.

But trust me, it does get better. I haven’t truly experienced the fullness of terror since getting my tonsils out this summer, and I’ve heard so many other recovery stories.

These days, what I live with isn’t terror so much as a constant, mild anxiety. While the most recent Prednisone burst for my last flare quieted most of my symptoms and got me back to being functional, it didn’t get rid of that all-too-familiar feeling of worry.  Nowadays, I walk around feeling like something must be terribly wrong, but I have no idea what it is.

My anxiety is like the feeling you get when you’re lying in bed at night almost ready to sleep, and you suddenly realize that you didn’t do something important that you needed to do that day. It’s the feeling when you first realize you’ve lost your phone or your wallet, but you have no idea where it could be. It’s the feeling of dread when you’re about to go meet with the principal at school because you acted out. But unlike those situations, the only thing wrong is my PANDAS—not something external.

I’m used to the anxiety by now, and it’s no longer bad enough to make me want to run away from myself. While it’s certainly still disruptive, I’m able to go to class and get my work done anyway. I’m so accustomed to it that I almost don’t notice it, since I don’t know what life is like without being a little afraid. Besides, my non-PANDAS self knows the anxiety is brain inflammation—not based in reality.

Even so, my team of doctors and I are not satisfied with me feeling that something must be terribly wrong—not to mention the tics that have returned. We’ll be checking titers and Ig levels and possibly changing antibiotics, so I’m doing my best to look at the coming weeks with hope—not dread.

Until the Victory Is Mine

I was hoping to never again need my 10 mg Prednisone tablets...

I was hoping to never again need my 10 mg Prednisone tablets…

One of the hardest things about PANDAS is that you never know what it’s going to do next. Just as you’ve finally gotten your life back, it can strike again. Or just as you’re sure the fight is hopeless, things might turn a corner. Sometimes, it seems like there’s no rhyme or reason to its course.

Indeed, it wasn’t too long ago that my doctor said I was in remission. My family and I were stunned at the improvements I was making after my tonsillectomy. But this week, the unthinkable has happened: I am, once again, having a flare.

Over the last month, I’ve been going through more and more days with significant symptoms. I tried to attribute them to the stress of college or to psychological trauma from living with a horrible illness for so long. I didn’t even consider the possibility that my illness was coming back. But this week, I finally fell off the cliff again, and it was impossible to deny.

Not too long ago, I was feeling on top of the world, loving every moment of college. But one day, I woke up with a sore throat and despair, and nothing has been right since.

My depression has been so bad that I cannot make myself get off the floor of my room to even get a cup of water. I cannot do any homework, because as soon as I try (when I can make myself try at all), I burst into tears for no reason. I cannot concentrate on anything I would normally want to work on, either, which makes me feel like a total failure in life. I’ve been experiencing that all-too-familiar feeling of being detached from the world around me, as if I’m separated by an invisible wall. Most telling of all, my legs have begun to seize up on me when I walk, and I’ve lost the fine-motor skills that let me type accurately. And, of course, I’m being tormented with new obsessions and compulsions.

I’m devastated. I was hoping that I could just be done with this blasted disease and get on with my life. Is being able to use my brain too much to ask for? I want nothing more than to live a quiet, productive life and to contribute positive things to society.  And yes, it would be really nice if I could actually be happy. But instead, here I am, crippled by the despair and terror that this disease creates in my brain.

However, as awful and disappointing as it is to be having such debilitating symptoms again, people have pointed out that flaring doesn’t mean I’m heading for a full-blown relapse. It’s just as likely that I’m still healing, and this is only a bump in the road. If I’ve learned anything from my long recovery journey, it’s that healing a brain and an immune system is never a linear process. Sometimes, you make giant leaps forward. Other times, you stumble down a few stairs. But the most important thing is to keep getting back up and fighting with everything you have.

I’ve been on a 5-day burst of a higher dose of Prednisone, and it’s helped tremendously so far. While I’m glad for the relief, it’s been difficult to realize that many of my symptoms can be attributed to inflammation—which means I still have bad antibodies affecting my brain. It’s hard to know that I’m still fighting that familiar foe.

Honestly, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t worried about what the future holds or wondering if I’ll ever really get 100% better. I’m so sick of battling this disease, but if I’ve made it this far, I can’t possibly give up now.

So here’s to staying in this war a little while longer, until the victory is mine.

Quietly Out of Control

You can binge eat on a paleo diet? Heaven help me…

When most people who’ve dealt with PANDAS or PANS think about being out of control, what probably comes to mind are episodes of rage, debilitating OCD, constant tics, and panic attacks. While these things are the most characteristic of the disorder, during the last few weeks, I’ve been finding that sometimes, you can be out-of-control and look totally fine on the outside.

Right now, it feels as though all of my thoughts are swarming around me, and I try to catch them, but they manage to slip out of my hands before I can put them back into the cage of my head. Just as I’ve grabbed one thought, as soon as I try to reach for another, the first one slips out. I forget things quickly. I don’t pay attention. I get nothing done. I end up feeling frantic and restless, yet I can’t actually do anything productive with all of this unfocused energy.

But what makes me feel the most out-of-control is that there’s a puppeteer in my head that makes me do things I don’t really want to do. It makes me read pointless articles on the Internet when I want to be reading my textbooks. It makes me sit on the floor and stare at nothing instead of getting into bed when I’m ready to sleep. It makes me bike all the way across town to areas I don’t know when I only need to bike to the college library. And it’s impossible to extricate myself from the puppeteer’s control.

Lately, it has me doing something even more disturbing: binge eating.

I think about food a lot, and often, I start eating when I’m not even hungry. And then I can’t stop. I just stand in the kitchen eating and eating, knowing exactly what’s going on, but feeling powerless to do anything else. When I’m finally done, I feel bad about it, and I’m tormented with the idea that I’m going to get fat. I think about fasting to make up for it (but I never actually do it). I think about how long I will have to work out to burn it off. I “check myself” in the mirror every time I walk by, which I know is ridiculous, but it sometimes makes me feel better for a moment.

So far, I’m still below the weight I was before I had an intense period of restricted eating in the summer of 2014. I tell myself that as long as I keep running and working out, it will be fine. But I know I’m not fine…

I’m not heading in a good direction.  I’m beyond frustrated with my out-of-control mind, and I’m frightened by my out-of-control actions.

In desperation during midterms the other week, I restarted taking Provigil (with my doctor’s approval) to maybe have something that remotely resembled an ability to focus and get some work done. For a week, it worked beautifully, but now, I’m feeling unfocused and out-of-control all over again. Even worse, my depression has come back despite temporarily stopping my Prednisone taper—which my doctor suspected was causing it a couple weeks ago.

I’m beginning to question everything all over again… Am I really in remission? Am I getting worse? Am I feeling this way because my classmate just had Strep? Could this be related to the Prednisone taper? Is any of it part of the PTSD?

For now, I have no answers. I’m going back to the psychiatrist this week, though, so maybe he can help get me through this rough patch…

I’m better than I was last semester or a year ago. I do have good days where I have concentration and control. I’ve even had quite a few days where I’m not depressed, either. But one thing is certain: I’m still fighting PANS. And whatever it takes, I have to find a way to put my thoughts back into my head and free myself from the puppeteer.

Why I’m Better, Not Over It

I'm always cautious, waiting for the next symptom to come back...

I’m always cautious, waiting for the next symptom to come back…

This week, I woke up and cried.

99% of the time, I focus on how wonderful it is to be in remission, and I don’t allow myself to think about how awful my life used to be.  I don’t let myself feel sorry for myself.  I try to not dwell on the past.  But several nights per week, I have nightmares—most of which revolve around everything that happened to me.  And these are what break me.

I want more than anything to just get on with my life, and in many ways, I have.  These days, I feel the most like myself that I’ve felt in two or three years. My good days are up to 98% symptom-free, and my bad ones are rarely below 90%.  Although my life is still affected by PANS, it isn’t controlled by it…

Yet the nightmares still come.

This week, I realized that although I’m mostly recovered physically, I’m not recovered emotionallyI’m still not over what this disease once did to me. And I’m not over the (very small) possibility that it could return someday.

Sometimes, I feel like I live my life waiting for the other shoe to drop. I’m always waiting for the next virus to send me back into a flare. I’m forever watching every little movement and thought, ready to fight against my next PANS assault…

My arm jerks a little bit, but I didn’t tell it to move. Was that a chorea movement? Or was that just a normal twitch? Am I going to flare?

I completely forget about a homework assignment until the last minute. Was that brain fog? Am I getting forgetful again?

I have no appetite one night and decide not to eat. Is this the return of an eating disorder?

I feel sad one day. Is this the start of depression?

When I keep myself busy during the day as I’ve been doing at college lately, I’m able to mostly stop thinking about potential symptoms.  But when the day is done, the nightmares often rush in: I have dreams of the future where I am doing worse and need more treatment; I have dreams where I see myself falling down whenever I try to walk; I see myself surrounded by confused doctors; I see myself getting IVIG. I wake up relieved for a moment that it’s just a dream, but then I realize that it isn’t—it really happened.

I wish I could only be grateful for my recovery and move on, but when my mind is stilled and the lights go out, I’m haunted by my past. I can’t undo the six-year torment of facing OCD all alone, too scared to ask for help. I can’t forget the daily despair of knowing I was losing more and more of myself with every day that went by last spring. I can’t erase the terrifying hours of descending into flares, knowing I was losing control over my body and mind.

The reality is that PANS was a traumatic experience. PANS essentially killed me, but I was incredibly fortunate to find a doctor who brought me back to life. Still, no IVIG or tonsillectomy or Prednisone burst can help me come to terms with the last nine years.  I need time and maybe some help in order to heal emotionally.

Indeed, I’ve been in and out of counseling for the last year, and I believe it’s helped me have the courage to keep moving forward as much as I have. I may need another year of it to fully heal. At some point, I will heal, but I will never get over it, because “dying” has changed the way I look at life, for better or for worse.

Someday, I will realize that I haven’t had a bad flare in years. I will realize that I’ve been living my life, and PANS hasn’t hindered it. Then, I will exhale, and PANS will only be a scar—but always an indelible mark on who I am.  I can’t “get over it,” but I can choose to keep living and fighting for all that I once lost.

Am I Twenty or Twelve?

P1030195-small

A flower is mature, yet fragile and innocent… Like me

After battling PANS for the past nine years of my life, I’ve been forced to grow up too quickly while being stuck as a child. I’ve had to mature to face up to my circumstances, but I’ve had to count on my parents to take care of me more than most others my age have.

At twenty years old, I’ve never held down a consistent, weekly job. I’ve never had a boyfriend. I’ve never gone on anything beyond a day trip with my friends without an “adult” present. Over the last year, I’ve let my parents make many decisions for me, because I’ve known I couldn’t trust my own judgement. In many ways, I feel like a young teenager.

On the other hand, I aged twenty years the night that my OCD first came on. I realized that your whole world could be turned upside down in one moment. I shouldered the burden of upsetting intrusive thoughts for six years without telling anyone. I learned what it was to live in constant pain—physical and emotional—and to go on in spite of it. I figured out how to overcome tremendous obstacles in order to graduate high school and eventually get accepted to my dream college.

As a result of PANS, I’ve gained a perspective on life that some people twice my age don’t have. After fighting this utterly debilitating disease, I’ve learned to not take life and health for granted. I’ve learned that our brains and minds are fragile—but that human beings can be unbelievably resilient. Not a day goes by without me thinking about how fortunate I am to be alive and (mostly) well.

The trouble is that being both young and old at the same time makes it hard to relate to others of the same chronological age. I can’t party and go places like my peers do, because I don’t have the mental energy, and I’d prefer to get a good night’s sleep. This is preposterous to so many people. Why should a twenty-year-old have a bedtime? No matter how hard I try, even when I feel great, I can’t just be carefree anymore. I feel old, because my experiences have stirred up the waters of worry and cautiousness about every situation.

At the same time, I feel childish and somewhat inferior for my lack of stamina and independence. I sent in an application for my first real job this semester, and it got accepted, but I decided that I couldn’t count on having fifteen hours a week to spare—and this while taking a reduced course load to accommodate my lingering cognitive challenges. So will I ever become independent? Am I always going to feel like a woman-child, reliant on my parents for everything?

I wish I could just be twenty. I wish I could grow up and be an adult. I wish I could get younger and not worry about my health.

OCD No More?

Leaving a switch on can be bad news for my OCD...

Leaving a switch on can be bad news for my OCD…

Ever since my tonsillectomy, I’ve noticed my OCD dying down significantly. I’ve found myself touching cabinet knobs in the kitchen that I haven’t been able to touch in over a year. I’m not checking my room for people trying to hurt me. I’m not washing my hands all the time.

I’ve been in CBT all summer, but the improvement I’ve seen seemed to happen much more suddenly and with much less effort than what I normally get from using therapy techniques alone. It was as if maybe, I had less brain inflammation, because I no longer had an infection in my tonsils.

But one evening, I was in the car with my parents heading to church, and out of nowhere, the OCD thoughts came roaring back:

You didn’t turn off the stereo, so now the whole house is going to burn down while you’re gone. You didn’t bring your computer with you in the car, you haven’t backed it up, and now, you’re going to lose five years of work when it burns up.

My heart began to race as I wrung my sweaty hands together in the back seat.

“Hey… I left the stereo on. Do you think that’s okay?” I asked my parents.

“Yes, that’s fine. Nothing will happen,” my mom assured me.

But that wasn’t enough. My brain wanted me to ask again and again, or better yet, go back home and turn everything off.  I wanted some reassurance that my thoughts were lying to me (even though part of me knew it was all ridiculous). But after the months of therapy I’ve been through, I knew that no matter how long I kept asking, I’d never get the certainty I craved.  So I stopped and sat there with the anxiety instead.

It wasn’t easy, though. The anxiety felt like someone was scraping their fingernails against a chalkboard inside my head. It was as if I had to crawl out of my skin, but I couldn’t. OCD is like a little brother that keeps poking you all day long, no matter how many times you ask him to stop.

But like a naughty little brother, if you can learn to ignore him and not react, eventually, he will go away.

To calm my anxiety, I tried some “box breathing:” inhale for five seconds, hold your breath for five seconds, exhale for five seconds, hold your breath for five seconds again, and repeat. I’ve never been a fan of breathing exercises, but this technique actually works for me.

By the time we got to church, I was feeling much better. But of course, I was still waiting for the rest of the flare to come. If my OCD had suddenly spiked, wasn’t I going to lose myself at any moment? Wasn’t I about to start doing the chorea dance again? Wasn’t I about to fall into a deep depression? Not necessarily.

My psychiatrist told me that he expects I’ll always have a tendency toward OCD to a more mild extent, even when I’m cured from PANS. He believes that people with PANS are pre-disposed to OCD, so I shouldn’t expect it to completely go away from IVIG or tonsillectomy or any other medical treatment.

He wasn’t trying to negate that those things help OCD in people with PANS. He was just saying that, like everyone else with OCD, I have to treat it with therapy so that I know how to manage whatever tendencies and learned behaviors may be left when I’m otherwise symptom-free.

I must admit that I was a little discouraged when I heard this, but there’s a bright side if he’s right: just because I have one hour where my OCD acts up a little doesn’t mean I’m “flaring” in the PANDAS sense of the word. Just because my OCD is worse one night doesn’t mean I have to load up on Prednisone and prepare for battle. If I do have some degree of “normal” OCD, then it will simply act up occasionally, especially under stressful circumstances—but OCD can be managed.

Sure enough, the rest of the PANDAS symptoms never came that night. Maybe it was just a “flare” of regular OCD. Maybe it was a very mild PANDAS flare. No one knows. But what I do know is that, aside from that night, my OCD is dramatically better than it was a couple weeks ago.

To me, I think the most important thing for PANDA’s is to treat both the immune response causing the worst of the OCD and to do CBT to deal with the OCD in the meantime—whether it’s purely caused by inflammation or if it’s also something we’ll always be prone to.

Why Bedtime Can Be Terrifying

How can you sleep when the PANDAS bear follows you to bed?

How can you sleep when the PANDAS bear follows you to bed?

Tap, tap, tap.

It’s 2 AM, and someone is at my bedroom door. I bolt awake and hold still so they don’t know I’m in the room. I slowly reach for my phone and think about texting my parents to come help me.

But I’m all alone. No one is at the door.

I’m hallucinating again.

I try to tell myself that what I heard wasn’t real. I try to tell myself that my brain is playing tricks on me again. But no matter what I do, I’m afraid. I may be twenty years old, but sometimes, I still ask my mom to sleep in my room because falling asleep can be so frightening.

When I’ve been at my worst, my hallucinations have also happened while I was wide awake. Usually, these hallucinations were just colored blobs floating around me, but the first time it happened, I was twelve and too scared to tell anyone, so I wrote about in my journal:

Journal Entry

“I was lying in my bed… When I looked at the lower left hand corner of the bed, I saw a clearish thing with two black dots, about two inches from top to bottom. I think I saw a spirit of some kind. Be it an angel or a fallen angel or something else that I’m unaware of, I don’t know. I’m a bit freaked out right now.”

If you think seeing “spirits” around my bed or having an auditory hallucination of someone knocking on my door is terrifying, last fall, I woke up at five o’clock in the morning with a giant black bear snarling at me next to my bed. In the moment, it was completely real to me, and I screamed. But I quickly realized the only bear in my apartment that night was the PANDAS bear in my brain…

More recently, if I’ve hallucinated, they’ve been mild auditory hallucinations such as the tapping noise at my door, and they only happen while falling asleep or waking up (hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations). Now, I’ve managed to go several weeks without a nighttime hallucination, but I still worry about it happening sometimes.

Right now, what makes bedtime so difficult is that, for the first hour I’m in bed, I often go through periods of being half-asleep and then suddenly startling awake. My thoughts begin to turn into half-asleep dreams, and out-of-nowhere, a troubling (and often irrational) idea comes and disturbs me so much that I wake up:

Oh no! I say to myself. I must not believe in God anymore.

My eyes spring open, and I try to talk myself down from the troubling thought: It’s just my OCD. It’s not true. I can’t decide anything about my faith in a state like this. I need to just go back to sleep.

A few minutes later, I fall asleep, and it happens again:

Oh my gosh! What would’ve happened if I’d fallen off that cruise ship I was on five years ago?! I could’ve died.

Just as I’ve calmed my mind and gone back to sleep, I’m bothered again:

Wait a minute… Did I really pass all my classes this semester? Wasn’t there something else I needed to do?

The first week after my tonsillectomy, after a couple days when the swelling went down, I had no trouble falling asleep because of the narcotics. Now that I’m healed and off the pain killers, I’ve had less nights of startling awake with fear, but I still wake up more often than I should. Bedtime still isn’t easy, because I’m still anxious about getting in bed in the first place.

The way I see it, bad things happen in bed… My OCD onset happened when I was eleven while I was in bed. My worst panic attack ever and the start of my chorea movements happened last summer while I was in bed. I’ve seen growling bears and floating “demons” while in bed. I’ve woken up with my arms completely numb and paralyzed in bed. I’ve woken up screaming for no apparent reason while in bed.

Sometimes, I think a lot of the anxiety I experience now isn’t a symptom of my disease anymore so much as a consequence of having lived with it for so long. How could I not be anxious about a part of my day that has been so unpleasant for me for so many years? How could I not worry about frightening hallucinations happening again?

Earlier in the summer, my nighttime symptoms were so bad that my psychiatrist wanted me to take anti-psychotics before bed. But now, I think the best thing for me is to work through the anxiety and relearn to think of sleep as, not a time of torment, but a time of rest.

Goodbye, Tonsils

Dairy-free ice cream

I don’t even wanna know how many pints of this I’m about to eat…

With one day left until my surgery now, it’s been an interesting week. For the first time in eleven months, I’ve stopped antibiotics completely, so as not to influence the tonsil and adenoid cultures that will be performed. The doctors also told me to stop all supplements, so my pill cases have been extraordinarily empty these last few days (a much-welcomed sight!). Although I’ve had a slight increase in tics, trouble concentrating, and more trouble falling asleep, I haven’t noticed nearly as much of a difference as I expected.

Strangely, after the flare a couple weeks ago, I’ve been doing quite well. I still have a decent amount of OCD and significant problems with falling asleep, but I barely have any choreiform movements. I’ve been walking around the house expecting that weird, limp feeling in my legs that makes me fall down, but it just doesn’t happen anymore. I’m not even depressed, either.

Naturally, this has me wondering why I’m about to go through all this pain and hassle to get my tonsils out when I seem to be doing okay now. What if I’m actually heading for healing now? What if they culture my tonsils and find there was nothing in them? I’m twenty. I legally don’t have to do what anyone tells me. I can decide to back out of the surgery.

But what if I am about to flare again? What if my tonsils are riddled with strep or another infection?

So I’ve resigned myself to the fact that I don’t really have a choice in getting my tonsils and adenoids out. I have to comply. All of my doctors—including my neurologist and my psychiatrist and obviously the otolaryngologist who is doing the surgery—agree that it needs to be done.

I’m trying to not let myself be nervous, but it’s almost impossible for someone who has existing anxiety issues. My tactic is to not think about it. I comfort myself with the knowledge that I won’t remember the surgery since I’ll be asleep. I try not to let myself think about the idea that the doctors could make a mistake. I try not to worry about having bleeding problems afterwards that send me to the ER (it apparently happens more frequently in adults).

So what about the inevitable pain afterwards?  (I’m warned that it will hurt a lot more since I’m an adult.) Well, that’s why I have narcotics. I didn’t even touch my Percocet when I had my wisdom teeth out a few years ago, though, so I like to think my pain threshold is pretty high. Besides, I’m sure that there is absolutely nothing more painful than my OCD once was. If I got through that, then no sore throat—no matter how miserable—will get me down.

My surgery won’t be until the early afternoon, which unfortunately means I have a whole morning to worry about the procedure. But because I have the whole morning, I decided that I’m going to go for a run. For me, running makes everything better. It also has the added benefit of making me not hungry for at least an hour afterwards (and I have to fast for the surgery), so if I time it right, I’ll have just enough time tomorrow morning to go for a run, get rehydrated, take a shower, gather my things, and then head to the hospital. I’m getting rid of all the extra time I could spend worrying.

Still, it might not be an easy couple of weeks. Even if I do like ice cream, it’s not going to be a fun time. But I’m going to get through it. Who knows? Maybe it will be apparent that I needed the surgery after all. Perhaps saying goodbye to my tonsils will be saying hello to complete healing.

Another Flare, Another Decision

With PANDAS, it’s astonishing how much can change in one day. Last June, I developed a tic disorder and became unable to walk in just a few hours. I’ve spent the year that followed fighting to get my life back. One day this week, I flared again, and it’s already had astonishing repercussions…

After a week on Wellbutrin, I was starting to feel the closest to normal that I’ve felt in two years. It was like the summer before I went off to college—I had some OCD and anxiety but was mostly functional and otherwise healthy. Unfortunately, after five days of feeling great last week, I slowly fell back into depression. Then, I got a sore throat, a headache, and a cough.

Getting sick never just means being under-the-weather for a few days...

Getting sick never just means being under-the-weather for a few days…

A few days later, I lost it.

That night, I sat down in a recliner and cried for no apparent reason. I don’t remember what happened after that, but I ended up in the kitchen. I looked at the door to the street and thought to myself, I need to run.

I was too exhausted to actually leave, so instead, I slammed myself into a wall on purpose.

I didn’t actually want to hurt myself—I just felt like I needed to do it but didn’t know why. I think when a lot of PANDAs have flares, we’re not in control of anything we think or do anymore. It’s like an outside force comes and takes over. It’s my theory that our fight-or-flight instinct (controlled by the basal ganglia that’s irritated by our bad antibodies) goes totally haywire, telling us that we have to “fight” by doing strange actions.

During flares, I feel I either have to slam myself into a wall or run out of the house; this is my messed up version of “fight-or-flight,” but the only real danger is the malfunctioning instinct itself.

Thankfully, I realized what was happening, and I made myself go to the basement to tell my parents. At this point, I was sobbing and feeling utterly hopeless. A few minutes later, I began jerking violently. My movements were suddenly the worst they’d been in months.

The next morning, we spoke to my neurologist, and that’s when I got the news:

You need to get your tonsils and adenoids removed. There might be strep or another infection hiding in there.”

It’s not typical for someone whose had two IVIGs to continue to flare every two or three weeks like I do. I’ve been tested for all kinds of viruses and infections, and they’ve all been negative. Apparently, you can have something hiding in your tonsils and not have it show up in blood work. If I do have strep or another infection or virus in my tonsils, it makes sense that I’m having flares so regularly. Unfortunately, the only way to find out if the tonsils are the problem is to remove them.

At this point, I don’t much care what it takes to stop this disease. If surgery will do it, then fine. I’ve been warned that it could be very painful to have a tonsillectomy as a twenty-year-old, but you know what? I’ve been through so much worse. I’m not afraid of the pain.

But sadly, having surgery this summer means I might not graduate college on-time. I was counting on taking online classes from home to make up for the reduced load I took last year. How could I do research and write twenty-page papers on narcotics?

I thought about forgoing the surgery and continuing to force myself through my four-year plan, but I don’t want to anymore. Although I’ve made straight-A’s and won scholarships for outstanding work in the midst of everything, I’ve been miserable in the process. I want to thrive, not just academically, but as a whole person. I decided that it’s better to give myself a shot at getting better by having surgery and taking an extra semester to finish college.

Yet again, so much has changed in just one day, because taking an extra semester means delaying graduate school by an entire year—that’s a whole year I’ll have to figure out what to do with myself at home (maybe that’s when I’ll write my book!). It’s a lot to process, and I’d be lying if I said I was completely okay with it right now. But still, if taking my time with school and getting my tonsils out is what it takes to get me better, it’s a fair trade…

Let It Roll: OCD & Mountain Biking

Woods

Recently, I’ve taken up mountain biking, and strangely, there are a lot of parallels between becoming a mountain biker and overcoming OCD…

Ever since last summer, I’ve been apprehensive about getting on a bike, considering that my legs used to give out on me frequently when I walked. If one of these attacks happened as I rode a bike at 20 mph down a road, I could get seriously hurt.

But this week, I got back on my bike anyway and rolled into the woods, following a friend of mine who’s an avid mountain biker.

At first, the trail was smooth and wide, and I felt great. But then, to my horror, a patch of roots and rocks showed up right in front of me.  I braked hard and skidded to a stop.

“How can anyone ride over that?” I said.

“Just let it roll. Don’t think about it too much.”

Being a beginner, every little rock in the trail seemed like something to worry about. Surely my little bike tires couldn’t handle all that, right? But soon, I began to discover that things that seemed like a big deal really didn’t matter.

This is how the intrusive thoughts of OCD are. I have all kinds of crazy and upsetting thoughts popping into my head like the little bumps in the trail. My instinct is to put on the brakes and try to “go around” the thoughts by carrying out compulsions. But if I just let myself roll through them without being afraid they’ll send me over the handlebars, I end up having far less trouble. No matter how scary the thoughts seem, they’re only thoughts—they can’t hurt you if you just keep rolling.

As the day went on, I got more and more confident in my abilities. Before long, I was barreling down the trail over much larger roots and rocks. True, I was sometimes afraid of what I saw approaching, but I chose to ride over those things anyway. It wasn’t so much that I’d become a more skilled biker in a couple hours—it was that I’d simply begun to believe I could make it through the obstacles.

Similarly, the first time I went through CBT, learning to not carry out my compulsions initially seemed impossible. How could I possibly roll through the intrusive thoughts without canceling them? How could I get through my exposures? Over time, I began to learn that I could survive the anxiety that came with not doing my compulsions or following my rules. Before long, I was rolling through all kinds of terrible thoughts without doing any compulsions—and nothing bad ever happened. Once I’d tackled the smaller rocky thoughts, I could later learn to ignore the bigger, more challenging ones.

After several miles of biking through wooded, rocky, twisty trails, we rode back to the car, exhausted but high on endorphins. I was muddy and had a few scrapes from occasionally riding too close to thorn bushes, but guess what? I’d made it, even though I wasn’t sure I could. I never crashed once and had somehow had a blast.

“You know, I think you’re a natural at this,” my friend told me.

“Thanks! It must be my running legs,” I said.

But I know that it wasn’t just my fitness. It was because I’d had plenty of practice learning to push past fear and anxiety thanks to eight months of OCD therapy. Who knows? Maybe it can work the other way around, too. Maybe mountain biking will make me more confident about facing my fears in this summer’s CBT sessions…

IVIG#2, Two Months Later

Wellbutrin XL: The Latest Addition to My Daily Pile of Meds

Wellbutrin XL: The Latest Addition to the Daily Pile of Meds & Supplements

As my two-month IVIG follow-up approached, I was sure I would have bad news no matter what. It would be bad news if my doctor decided I needed an invasive plasmapheresis treatment. It would be just as bad if she told me we had to “wait and see” if this second IVIG worked, because certain symptoms were still making me miserable.

Well, I didn’t exactly get either piece of news. We made a plan that involved neither option…

In the last few weeks, I’ve realized that my OCD is about to get completely out-of-hand, and I’ve also been slipping back into depression.  And this wasn’t a mild depressive episode—my depression turned me into an unrecognizable lump of a human being, exhausted by even the simplest tasks and unable to enjoy anything at all.

Yet as awful as I’ve been feeling mentally and emotionally, all my other symptoms are disappearing, so the IVIG is starting to work.  Given a few more months, maybe I’ll be completely cured…

Today, I have no sign of a sleep disorder of any kind.  I no longer need Nuvigil to stay awake during the day or any kind of sleep aid to fall asleep at night.  This, on its own, is a miracle, considering that a year ago, my sleepiness was so constant and severe that I was misdiagnosed with Narcolepsy and told I would never get better…

I can go for hours at a time without having any tics or choreiform movements, and when I do have them, they’re hardly noticeable.  It’s quite a transformation from someone who was involuntarily thrashing around violently in the ER eleven months ago.  I do still occasionally have my legs lock up on me when I walk, but I haven’t fallen down in weeks—and I used to fall at least 100+ times per day…

I should also mention that my memory and concentration are coming back, and I’m no longer having that feeling of being completely “out-of-it” or “not there.”  Even though I’m depressed, I have a mental clarity that I didn’t have a few months ago.

If it weren’t for my OCD and depression, I could almost just live with this disease without much complaint now.  But let’s face it—OCD and depression, even if you didn’t have all the other PANS symptoms, can be far more than anyone should have to deal with.

“Have you tried CBT for your OCD?” my neurologist asked.

“I mean, I did eight months of it a couple years ago…”

“I think you need to do it again. Your brain is ready for it now.”

Strangely, I found myself almost feeling happy about the idea of going back to therapy—not because I enjoy it (I actually hate it), but because I’m ready to get rid of my OCD and social anxiety. I was considering going back to therapy before my doctor recommended it, but now that she told me I should do it, I really didn’t have any excuse not to go. I remember how hard ERP therapy was two years ago, but the freedom I gained was so worth it. I know it’s still not going to be easy this time around, but it’s time to send my OCD packing, once and for all.

But what about my depression?

We have a solution—I’m now taking Wellbutrin XL, and after a few days on it, I’ve begun to feel significantly better. I have more energy and don’t feel like I’m dragging myself through each day. I’m actually happy. I’m slowly getting back into the things I used to enjoy.

From what I understood at my appointment, my doctor said that since I no longer have as many antibodies interfering with my brain’s dopamine receptors, my body hasn’t yet re-calibrated to make the right amount of dopamine.  I think she said I don’t have enough dopamine yet, so that’s why I’m depressed.  Our hope is that the Wellbutrin will help re-balance my brain chemistry.

I’m certainly not glad that I need an anti-depressant and have to go back to therapy for my OCD, but I’m glad that things are going to get better. For that matter, I’m glad that so many of my other symptoms are far better than they once were. I’m relieved that, for now, I’m not doing any more IVIG or plasmapheresis.

Who knows? Maybe this really is the beginning of the end…

Alone

Alone

While studying in my room one night, I heard laughter and music outside my window and smelled gas and burgers. I looked outside, and half a dozen people were having a wonderful time sitting around a grill, sharing food and stories about upcoming final projects.

And that’s when it hit me—I’m so lonely that I don’t even know I’m lonely.  I’m so lonely that I forget how much I miss spending time with people—until I see others doing it.

I know a lot of people at my college, but I maybe only have one or two close friends. Maybe…

Why is that? Despite the lies my social anxiety tells me, I don’t actually think I’m that unlikeable. Even factoring in the minor tics I now live with on a day-to-day basis and my OCD rituals, I’m not so weird that people should avoid me. I’m not unkind—on the contrary, I bend over backwards for the people I love.  So where are my friends?

The problem is that I never go to anything I don’t have to go to, and I never do anything I’m not required to do. How can I make plans with anyone when I never know how I’ll be feeling in the next few hours, let alone in a few days?  I try to explain to people that I’m ill, but if you don’t spend time with someone, how can you get to know anyone?

In my entire college career, I’ve only once gone to a party—and I left after a few minutes. People invite me to parties and concerts and other outings, but more often than not, I decline. And yet I still wonder why I’m always alone on a Friday night. And some part of me always wishes things weren’t the way they are.

You see, it takes too much mental energy for me to go anywhere. I can hardly get to class sometimes because of my lingering cognitive deficits in planning, organization, and memory. I’ve had nights where I cried for an hour just thinking about how hard it would be to get ready and make myself get out the door to class the next morning. Do you really think I would willingly put myself through that unless I had to? No wonder I don’t go anywhere. No wonder I’m always alone.

Another reason I choose to be alone is that I don’t want to get exposed to any illnesses. It’s gotten to the point where, if I see a crowd or hear about an event, all I can think about is how many germs will be there. I know how bad my flares are when I get sick, and I don’t want to increase my chances of flaring. I’m sure that my contamination OCD only makes the fears worse—and when I do get sick, all of my symptoms (including the OCD) get worse, sending me into a vicious cycle. So I stay alone.

Even if I did make it to a party, I’m sure I would have a sensory overload. Sometimes, I can’t stand the sound of people talking, especially if it’s loud talking. Sometimes, even when I’m just spending time with my immediate family (whom I love), it gets to a point where all the words and back-and-forth conversation and noise become too much for me to handle, and I have to go be alone in my room for a while. How could I possibly go to a wild college party (even if I wanted to)?

If I didn’t have a sensory overload, then I’d surely have to deal with my social anxiety/OCD. After almost every interaction I have with someone, I get this feeling that I’ve probably offended them somehow, so I go over the conversation over and over again. I think about it a lot and imagine what that person must think about me. When I see that person again, I always think, “She might not like me anymore because I said x and did y,” and I sometimes don’t talk to her as much because of this. In reality, I know it’s irrational, but my brain always replays my conversations anyway. Should I willingly put myself through a whole night of obsessing? No, I think I’ll just be alone…

On a great day, I can spend time with my roommate cracking ridiculous jokes in the living room or maybe even taking a bike ride around campus. It’s much easier for me to interact with one or two people at once.

But when I can’t do that, most of the time, I’m actually quite content to sit in my apartment alone with a cup of hot tea and my ideas. Or if I have enough energy to get out the door (but not to talk to anyone), I’m quite happy to go for a run by myself in a quiet park. After all, I’ve always been an introvert, even before I got sick.

But sometimes, every once in a while, I wish I felt like I could choose to be on the other side of my window, hanging around a grill with my friends without a symptom on my mind…

I Don’t Know Anymore

Well, after dreading it and hoping and praying it wouldn’t happen again, I’ve just had another bad flare.

On my way to class last week, I overheard someone say she had Strep throat.

No. I can’t flare again, I thought to myself. It’s not going to happen. I’m still on antibiotics. I’ve had two IVIGs. I should have plenty of good antibodies if I’m exposed. I’ll be fine…

But then, when I got to class and saw one of my lab mates who hadn’t been around in a few days, I asked where he’d been—and immediately wished I hadn’t:

“Oh, I had strep throat. It was a really bad one!”

There was no way I hadn’t been exposed. My school seems to have a problem with Strep outbreaks, and even though I’m on antibiotics, I can still flare. My doctor explained to me that it’s like being “allergic” to Strep—just being around it, even if I don’t get a full-blown infection—could send my immune system into a tailspin.

I tried to convince myself that maybe this time would be different, but deep down, I knew it wasn’t right that it had taken me five hours to write a one-page paper the night before. I knew I suddenly had no concentration again. I knew I’d been ticking a little bit more. It all made perfect sense now.

Just as I was beginning to hope this was the extent of the flare, I finally fell off the cliff. The world began to slip away—it was that feeling of being stuck in a fog that separated me from everything else. I heard someone make a “bad” noise, and I became so anxious that I had to run into the gym to do a 9 mph sprint on the treadmill (in spite of the pain from my knee injury). The next day, I just started crying uncontrollably for no apparent reason. The depression came back.

“You know what this all means, don’t you?” I sobbed to my mom when I could finally call her.

“That you’re likely to need plasmapheresis. Yes, I know… Have you taken more Prednisone yet?”

“No! I’m sick of %$&^%$ Prednisone! I’m done with this ^%$&^% disease!”

I could hear my mom on the other end beginning to cry, too. Most days, my family and I can all hold it together and think about everything I’ve accomplished in spite of this illness. We can pretend that I’m mostly fine most of the time, but it’s moments like these that tear our hearts apart—moments when we are confronted with the worst of it and the realization of how helpless we are to fix it.

On top of not feeling like myself at all, I now had the added burden of worrying that my IVIG hadn’t worked. I knew I’d have to come home for the summer after all. I knew my neurologist might be suggesting plasmapheresis or Rituximab or another IVIG at my upcoming follow-up. I knew I couldn’t continue my Prednisone taper for the rest of the semester. I knew I really wasn’t okay yet, and I was devastated.

I ended up complying with my parents’ wishes and doing a 5-day burst of higher-dose Prednisone. As much as I hate the stuff, I hate the way I feel when I flare even more. I’m doing a lot better, but I’m still having tics and having trouble finding words and speaking in coherent sentences. But I’m more okay than I was.

I don’t know what my future holds anymore. Maybe I won’t have a flare this bad again—or maybe I really have stopped getting better. Maybe this IVIG will start to work soon—or maybe I’ll get off Prednisone this summer and discover that I’m still bordering on insanity without it. I don’t know. Only time will tell…

My First “Normal” Summer?

IMG_1872-small

This week, I have wonderful news… Instead of moving home for the summer like I’d planned, I’ve decided to remain at school to take classes and work.

While this may sound like a “normal” summer for an almost-20-year-old, for me, it’s a huge victory. Not too long ago, I hated everything and wanted nothing more than to go home and spend my summer lying on the couch or in bed (just like last summer). But now, I want to keep pursuing my dreams in this city—dreams that I’d pushed to the back burner for far too long because of my illness.

When I called my parents yesterday to inform them of my decision, I didn’t know how they’d react. I thought they might try to make me change my mind, but instead, they said my plans were, “the best news ever.”

“I feel great,” I said on the phone. “Really great.”

“How’s your OCD?” my mom asked.

And there was a long pause…

Recently, I’ve been having a hard time with sensory sensitivities.  If I feel certain sensations or see certain textures or hear certain sounds, I’m thrown into a flurry of compulsions and tics to try to get rid of the physical discomfort.

For example, I can’t stand it when my feet rub across the floor or the ground in a certain way. If it happens, I have to go “undo” it by stepping on the same spot again or rubbing something else in a “good” way.  Just thinking about the noise and the sensation makes me very anxious. When it gets really severe, sometimes I won’t move until I can convince myself that it wouldn’t be “that bad” if I accidentally made the sound happen.

“Well, mom,” I said, “It’s gotten to the point where I’ve considered putting rubber mats on top of all the carpet in the apartment…” (For some reason, sliding on rubber or plastic doesn’t bother me nearly as much.)

“That’s not good.”

“Yeah, I know. And then I had a couple of days when I could hardly eat… And I’m sleeping terribly and can’t stay awake without Provigil… And then there’s the ADD…”

“Well, what’s so great about how you’re feeling now?”

It’s very hard for me to identify what it is, much more to explain it, but I feel a night-and-day improvement compared to where I was before my most recent IVIG. I’ve previously written about how my perception of the world and my awareness has improved, but to put it another way:

I may still have symptoms, but my symptoms don’t have me.

I’m not completely consumed by this disease anymore. I have a life that isn’t just about fighting PANDAS. I’m doing everything I want to be doing—even if it takes me longer than most people, and even if it takes more effort. Yes, having PANS causes significant difficulties, but I’ve learned how to work around them somewhat, and I’ve come to accept my life for what it is right now.

Certainly, I’d prefer to not have any of the challenges that I have. I want this IVIG to take care of everything that’s left. I don’t want to be tossed into the throws of partial insanity when I finish my Prednisone taper next month (I’m down to 8mg now!). I want to stay at school over the summer like I’ve planned—and not in isolation at home after a plasmapheresis hospital stay.

But I suppose if push comes to shove, I still want to be cured more than anything else, so I’d go home for treatment this summer if I needed it…

For now, though, I’m going to keep living as if I’ll get to have a “normal” summer, because I like looking forward to something normal—even though I know there’s a possibility that I’ll have no choice but to go home…

IVIG #2: I’m Finally Aware

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I just finished my second, and hopefully last, IVIG treatment!

Recently, I’d been feeling like I’d made no progress with any of my symptoms after my first IVIG.  But strangely, it was the process of going back for another IVIG that showed me this was simply untrue.

When I had the first IVIG in August, if I got out of the chair to stand up and stretch my legs, I started doing a wild choreiform movement dance. I couldn’t even look at my doctor to talk to her because I was moving so much. I had to hold onto the IV bag pole to keep from falling down when I tried to walk down the hall to the bathroom.

This time, I hardly had any movements, and the ones I did have were barely noticeable to anyone besides me—except for when I took one spill in the hallway…

While my movement disorders have improved significantly, I’d say the main difference between last week and my August IVIG has been that, before my first IVIG, I don’t think I fully understood how serious this disease could be.

In August, I didn’t realize that, if it weren’t for the Prednisone burst that had brought me back a few weeks beforehand, I could’ve starved myself. It didn’t occur to me that if we hadn’t figured out I had PANS, I would’ve been locked up in a psych ward with constant monitoring so I wouldn’t hurt myself. I didn’t grasp that I needed IVIG to avoid a lifetime of mental illness, disability, and unimaginable suffering.

But now I get it.  Sometimes, it’s too much to process.  I simply cannot bear to think about what would’ve happened to me without treatment.  I nearly lost everything…

During the IVIG treatment this week, I was also well enough to understand how bad things still are—although it’s a good sign that I’m able to recognize this. I know that my general and social anxiety and OCD have been incapacitating, all of my executive functioning abilities are very poor, and everyday tasks are sometimes impossible.

But even if some of these symptoms aren’t much better than they were in August, my perception is much improved. It’s like someone has finally given me a pair of glasses for my mind, and I can finally see what I’ve been missing for so long. While it’s painful to know there’s so much I couldn’t see, it’s comforting to know I’m coming back in some ways.

Unfortunately, being more aware means I’m also able to worry more.  I worry because, if this IVIG doesn’t bring me back to 100%, I’ll be spending a month of my summer in isolation following a five-day plasmapheresis treatment in the hospital. If that fails, I’ll be going through Rituximab infusions—a form of chemotherapy.

I had big plans to take summer classes and get a job, but how can I plan anything when I have no idea whether I’ll be able to leave my house or not this summer? All I want is to not suffer so much—especially since I’m so conscious of my suffering now. I just want to be allowed to be myself.

Sometimes, I cannot sleep at night because I’m afraid I’ll never get back to who I am. Or even worse, I worry that I won’t know that I’m not completely better, and then I won’t get the treatment I need, and then I’ll slip into a relapse just as I’ve finally returned to a good life—and then I’ll go through this whole thing all over again.

But I don’t want to worry—I want to enjoy the improvements I’ve already seen after this second IVIG: my OCD almost completely disappeared overnight, my memory is much better, I’ve been able to contribute to discussions in my classes this week, and I’m even enjoying things again. This is wonderful, almost miraculous, news. Oh, that this trend would continue…

Bring Me Back

Plane

As spring break approached, I did everything I could to avoid answering that dreaded question: “What are you doing over break?”

“Oh, I’m just taking a short trip to the city and then going home and resting,” I told most people.

But the whole truth is that I’ll be sitting in my doctor’s office for two days hooked up to an IV to get a bunch of people’s antibodies poured into my body. The truth is that I desperately need this treatment so that my own bad antibodies will stop attacking my brain. The truth is that I’m going for my second round of IVIG to hopefully wipe out this disease once and for all.

As I’ve listened to classmates discussing their cruises, beach outings, road trips, or even their plans to remain at school, I’ve found myself feeling resentful.  It isn’t the fact that I don’t get to spend the week on a beach with my friends—it’s the fact that I don’t have the freedom to choose not to do so.  My symptoms are severe enough that the only reasonable spring break for me is to get more treatment. What can I do? I have to go back for IVIG.

IVIG round 2––I'm partying so hard over spring break!

This is how I’m partying over spring break…

With so many emotions—hope, fear, anxiety, and more—I stepped into a cab after my last Friday class and headed to the airport to go home.  But it wasn’t that easy: my mom had to call the cab for me, because my social anxiety has been so bad lately.

Getting through the airport to go home was even more difficult because of my brain fog. These days, I walk around with a constant sense that I’ve forgotten to do something or that I’ve lost something. And sometimes, I get very confused by everyday things. Getting through an airport in that state was truly an accomplishment.

As I finally sat at my gate, amazed at how “off” and not completely present I was, I knew in my heart of hearts that, in spite of how much I wished to have a “normal” college spring break, it was time to go home.

Yes, I’m ready to be brought back. 

Oh, IVIG, please bring me home. Bring me back to who I am. Bring me back to the days when OCD didn’t force me to make everything “just right.” Bring me back to the days when I wasn’t afraid of everyone. Bring me back to the days when I wasn’t in constant pain. Bring back my memory. Bring back my concentration. Bring back my mental clarity. Bring back my mind. Bring back my health. Most of all, bring back my hope.

One way or another, I’m going home. It may not be this flight, this trip, and this treatment that gets me there, but somehow, I will find my way. I’m going to go home. Something, someday, will bring me back.

The Run of My Life

Recently, I signed up to run in my first half-marathon.  I was planning to cross the finish line this summer as the ultimate way to overcome PANDAS. I was hoping to be able to say, “Nine months ago, I couldn’t walk, but today, I’m totally healthy and symptom-free!”

But my plans have been ruined, and my dreams have been shattered.

When I underwent high-dose IVIG therapy in August, for the first time since I got sick eight years ago, I was hopeful about making a full recovery. I knew it could take up to a year for me to get completely better, but I didn’t mind. As long as I was getting better, no matter how slowly, I could keep hoping.

But then I stopped getting better.

I started tapering off my daily 20 mg dose of Prednisone in December, and I’ve gone downhill ever since. When I got to 3.5 mg, I was close to psychotic. I had some sense that I wasn’t right, but I wasn’t completely aware of how irrational and out-of-it I was. I stayed in bed all day long and didn’t go to class. I have since been staying at 7.5 mg, and although I’m in my right mind, I know I’m still not “right.”

Two weeks ago, I had the second-worst panic attack of my life during an exam. It had been three months since I had a panic attack at all. Even when I made up the test a week later, I was fighting off another attack the whole time, and as a result, I got a low grade.

On top of that, my OCD is suddenly out-of-control, to the point where I sometimes stay in my room instead of doing what I want because I don’t want to have to go through my decontamination rituals when I get back home. Not too long ago, I would’ve told you I hardly had any sign of OCD.

And now, I get confused at the strangest things. In church yesterday, as the offering plate was passed around (the same way it always is each week), I stared at the folded up checks in the plate and actually wondered for a moment, What am I supposed to do with this? What are those pieces of paper? Do we each take one?

My ticks and chorea are also back, and falling down is a daily occurrence.  My concentration is a joke.  No matter how much I sleep at night, I fall asleep all the time during the day without Provigil. I sometimes impulsively eat when I’m not even hungry (and I’ve still lost two pounds in the last month).

My parents told my neurologist about my ongoing symptoms, and now I’m scheduled for a second IVIG in March.

So here I am, six months post-IVIG about to go through the whole process all over again. I’m going to have to keep fighting for far longer than I expected. I may need plasmapheresis, too. I’m going to get extensive viral and infection testing to be sure there isn’t another underlying cause for my continuing flares—and if something comes back positive… Well, I don’t want to think about having to fight that off, too.

To say I’m devastated doesn’t even begin to express what I feel right now. It isn’t the fact that I’m spending two more days of my life getting treatment—it’s the fact that my “everyday” is still terrible. It’s the fact that the first IVIG wasn’t enough. It’s the fact that I’m still so sick when I hoped I would be almost completely better.

But I’m still running. I’m still training as hard as ever and not giving up on crossing that race’s finish line…

I don’t understand why I can still run when I’m otherwise dysfunctional, but running gives me the courage to keep persevering through the fight of my life when I’m sure I cannot possibly go on. Every time I finish a long run in spite of the last few miles of feeling exhausted and wondering how I would have the strength to finish, it gives me hope that I will someday also cross the finish line of PANS.

Someday, I will look back on this eight-year endurance challenge feeling on top of the world, and I will say, “That was one helluva run, but I did it!”

Falling Off

This bulletin board represents my life

Even though I love to decorate my room, when I moved into my apartment in August, I could only muster the willpower to put just a handful of small pictures on my bulletin board. During my Freshman year, I’d made my room look like “an Athenian palace,” as one friend put it—at least when I didn’t leave my trash strewn all over the floor (thanks, hoarding OCD).

My lack of decor last semester was an analog of my life. When I finally turned a corner in November, I covered most of my bulletin board with posters, postcards, pictures, and swag from my first 5k race. The better I’m doing, the more things are on the bulletin board.

A few weeks ago, pictures and papers started falling off, one-by-one. I didn’t put them back.

On some level, I knew I wasn’t feeling completely like myself, although I kept trying to pretend I was okay. But more pictures kept falling…

I began to struggle through each day more and more, feeling increasingly detached from everything around me while the ever-emptier bulletin board subconsciously reminded me I wasn’t myself. Then one night, I finally fell off a cliff.

I realized I’d come down with a virus. The virus itself was hardly noticeable, but the PANS symptoms that it caused to flare were debilitating. That night, I lost it. I was agitated for no reason. I kicked at the wall and made more papers fall off the board by accident.

While lying in bed, I thought to myself, I should go run around outside. I had no purpose or destination. I just felt strongly that I needed to do it—never mind that I was in my pajamas and it was extremely cold. But then the rational part of my mind kicked back in a little, I guess I should grab my keys. It never occurred to me how little sense it made and that if I was running around outside in my pajamas at 1:00 in the morning, campus police would probably think I was intoxicated—or take me to the psych ward.

The fatigue from the virus kept me in bed, but then the intrusive thoughts started up again and were very disturbing. I was severely depressed. Sometimes I actually believed the thoughts. Sometimes I wondered if I actually wanted them to be true. I didn’t know what thoughts were mine anymore. I didn’t realize how irrational I was thinking and behaving.

During one moment of insight, I finally reached for my phone and called my parents: “Mom, I need you to come right now. I’m losing it, and the thoughts are getting scarier and scarier.”

I ended up going back on a higher dose of Prednisone again. Amazingly, after a few days, it mostly brought me back to where I was when I was at my best in November.

This week, I’ve put everything back up on the bulletin board—and I even added some new things. I’m not depressed at all now, I’m ticking less, and I’ve had no trouble with remembering words. I feel connected to the world again.

I didn’t realize how far gone I was in that flare until I came out of it. I wasn’t too frightened at the time, but now I’m terrified that a cold made me lose my mind. What a horrible idea to live with!

I could worry about it happening again. I could back into a corner and scream, “Why me?” I could stay in my room and not come out so that I couldn’t catch another virus. Or I could just enjoy all the good days I’m having right now. I can keep living and doing the things I want to do.

I’ve decided to keep putting the pictures back even if they fall off sometimes. When they fall, they’re not gone forever—they’re only displaced. It’s hard to feel like you lose huge pieces of yourself sometimes, but I know they will always come back eventually…

Why Kids with PANDAS Are Brave

Recently, I had the chance to meet with a family who had two kids with PANS. We had some great conversations, and I’ll probably write a whole other post about our meeting another time. But there was one exchange between me and the seven-year-old that I can’t stop thinking about:

Me: “You’re very brave.”
Little PANDA: “Why?”

He was clearly surprised by my statement. I could tell that this idea was completely novel to him and that no one had told him this before. I didn’t expect a seven-year-old to have spent a great deal of time cogitating on the way he’s handling a disease, but I still found it curious that he had no concept that he was brave for continuing to fight it. I’ve thought about his reaction for awhile, though, and now it makes perfect sense…

You see, when you’re a kid with PANDAS or PANS, you live in a world of fear and anxiety. One day, you were fine, and the next, everything became scary. You don’t understand the things you do anymore, and sometimes, you’re even afraid of yourself because you don’t know when you’ll lose control next. You feel like a coward for being worried about things you know don’t make any sense—things that no one else around you fears. You feel crazy. You feel trapped. You feel anything but brave.

If you’re a seven-year-old living in that kind of world, of course you’d never think about how brave you are. But you can have courage and not even know it…

“You’re brave because you’re fighting against PANDAS,” I told him. “That’s a hard thing, but you’re doing it.”
Little PANDA: “Is my sister brave, too?”
Me: “Yes, she’s brave, too.”

PANDAs are not cowardly for having severe anxiety. They are not weak for losing control of their emotions. They are not crazy for carrying out compulsions. They are not freaks for having tics and other involuntary movements. No, they are children doing their best at fighting a devastating disease that’s attacking their brains—a disease they cannot control. None of us ever wanted to do odd behaviors and angrily lash out at our parents—when we do it, most of us only feel worse about ourselves afterwards. We hate all these symptoms, but we are doing the best we can to get through each day—and that takes courage.

Being brave doesn’t mean you aren’t afraid. Brave is going on in spite of the fear—and this is what all PANDAs are doing every day, whether they realize it or not. I hope more and more parents will start to understand this and remind their children that having irrational fears and continuing to fight them is brave.

IVIG: Four-Month Update!

It’s been over four months since I had IVIG—and six months since the abrupt onset of my tics and other movement problems. On the whole, I’d say I’m much better.  I’ve even started tapering off the steroids.  The way I put it with my family is that I finally feel like a person again.  I’m almost back to where I was before I started flaring two years ago—with the addition of tics, some walking issues, and hypersomnia.  It’s not all forward progress, though.  It’s really more of a two-steps-forward-one-step back process.

The movement problems have gotten slightly worse again, although they’re still nothing like the crazy chorea dance I was constantly doing this summer. The hypersomnia is by far the worst symptom now. I’m completely dysfunctional if I don’t take the wakefulness med Nuvigil. I fall asleep after sitting down anywhere for more than ten minutes. When I do happen to be “awake,” I’m loopy and can’t concentrate. At least I have Nuvigil… My doctor just started me on another anti-inflammatory called Plaquenil, so I’m hoping maybe it will help some of this.

When you’re sleep is messed up, everything is messed up.  I still have trouble with concentration and processing written information. The less steroids I take, the more I often I have trouble coming up with words for everyday objects, which only makes my social anxiety worse.  But I’m not depressed anymore. I still have quite a bit of general and social anxiety, but I was able to have a small party at my apartment at the end of the semester—even though the idea of having five friends over at once had me shaking all over earlier that day. A couple months ago, I know I wouldn’t have even considered inviting friends over.

Perhaps the most mind-blowing improvement is with my OCD. I’m slowly not carrying out compulsions anymore without having to go through months of CBT/ERP like I did in the past. There are times when I find myself touching something I wouldn’t have dared handle a couple months ago, and I only realize what I’ve done afterwards. I’m not sweating through anxiety when I don’t do my compulsions—I’m just not doing them without thinking about it. It’s amazing. As someone who has been through CBT before (and had success at the time), it’s very strange to see your brain rewiring itself without you having to consciously work so hard at it.

At my latest follow-up, my doctor told me I looked “less tormented.”  And that’s how it feels.   However, she was quite concerned about the sleep issues—especially that they had come back after being completely gone and that they didn’t go away on a Prednisone burst this time.

“At this point, we can talk about doing another IVIG,” She said. “But we need to wait at least six months to be sure you need it.”

I wasn’t surprised. But now I just have to keep waiting… again.

Nevertheless, on the whole, I’m doing so much better, and I’m very happy with the progress I’ve made. But do you want to know a secret? Getting better is frightening because the better I get, the more I realize how far gone I was this summer.  In June, I was hardly upset that I had stopped eating and couldn’t walk and suddenly had uncontrollable movements everywhere. I was apparently in a bit of a daze, and I had no idea how much I’d really lost my personality. Now that I’m back, I get it, and I’m even more grateful for my continuing recovery.

 

I’ve had this blog for over six months, and the responses and support I’ve received so far have been incredible. Thank you. I would love to get some feedback from all you amazing readers about what you want to read about next. I’m planning to continue posting regularly at least until I get 100% better and then for a few months afterwards.  That’s probably another year or two of writing.  (And then I want to turn it all into a book, but that’s another story…)

What topics would you most like to read about? Do you have any questions for me, as an eight-year survivor of OCD and PANS? Please comment with your ideas and thoughts!

Getting Over the Trauma of OCD

I usually say I’m mostly free from my OCD. Indeed, I no longer have to cancel out every intrusive thought that enters my mind, and I don’t have to double-check everything I say or write for a blasphemous double-meaning. Without hesitation, I can read passages of Scripture that once sent me into a full-blown panic attack. I’ve truly come a long way, but lately, I’ve been realizing that my fight isn’t over.

What I’ve been through as a result of Scrupulosity OCD was extremely traumatic. Do you know what it was like, as a devout Christian, to believe that you would be forever separated from the God you loved with your whole heart? To me, this was the worst thing that could have happened, and as far as I knew, it had happened.

The pain was real, even though the reality was totally different. The truth is, I just had a disease that manifested itself as extreme OCD that happened to take the form of religious obsessions and compulsions. No matter the content, all OCD is essentially the same. It wasn’t a “spiritual” issue any more than it was when I caught mono last year (and subsequently descended into the worst flare of my life).

I wish Scrupulosity got more attention both in the OCD community and in churches and other religious organizations. How many people are secretly tormented by unwanted thoughts and believe that God is mad at them because of their struggle? How many people are worried that they need an exorcism, when really, they have a misfiring brain that can be treated? Even one person going through what I have is too many.

Words are completely inadequate to describe the despair of feeling as though the next intrusive thought that came into my mind could ruin me forever—and living with the awful suspicion that I’d already doomed myself to an eternity apart from God. Scrupulosity is surely the closest thing to Hell that exists on this side of the grave.

If I told you it was once like the constant dripping of a Chinese water torture in your own mind, it wouldn’t begin to describe the torment.

If I said it was like being blind and deaf and unable to run while knowing you were being followed around by a hungry tiger, it couldn’t describe the incessant anxiety.

If I told you it was like having someone dangle you out the window of an airplane to drop you at any moment, it couldn’t communicate the sense of impending doom.

Even if my OCD were completely gone (which it is not), I still couldn’t just get over the sheer trauma of what it once did to me.   Sometimes, I still blame myself for not being “brave” enough to try to get help sooner–and for concealing my OCD so well.  But I was petrified and did the best I could.

While I may no longer have the compulsions surrounding my obsession of being unforgivable, the anxiety is still here; I am terrified of ever having to go through that pain again. Every time I go to church, every time I read the Bible, every time I just try to worship, that sense of imminent doom follows me there, because I can never forget how OCD once used my faith to torment me. I’m always waiting for the next obsession to come that will leave me paralyzed with anxiety all over again.

Sometimes, I think that OCD is going to make the very thing I feared the most come true for real—me walking away from God. How can I possibly keep believing when it hurts so much? How can I possibly trust in a God that I am, on some level, still afraid of? How can I ever get over what happened to me?

I’m mad at God—partially for letting these horrible things happen, but mostly because He has seemed so silent through much of my ordeal. Where was God during all those nights I spent alone in my room, sweating through panic attacks over Bible verses my brain abused? Why didn’t He just plainly tell me, “Hey, I’m not like that. Don’t listen to those lies…”

But don’t you see? Even if Christ Himself had appeared to me and assured me that none of my obsessions were anything to worry about, my OCD would’ve still moved on to find another thing to torment me. And I’m convinced if I had never had Scrupulosity, I would’ve had another kind of OCD—just like how now, it has become mostly contamination fears.

I know that God isn’t like my OCD—He’s not just waiting for the next opportunity to torment me and make me as miserable as possible. No, I’ve experienced His love for myself and on some level, I do know that He is the Perfect, Good Father that He says He is.

But I can’t fully believe it—not yet, anyway.

Yes, it’s true that I have a long way to go in the healing process. But I can’t help but be grateful that I am even at a place where I can recognize that I have OCD and am not a reprobate or a spiritual failure. Had I not figured out I had OCD, I certainly wouldn’t know I have PANDAS. Considering the severity of my symptoms, I might not still be here had I not gotten a proper diagnosis and treatment in time.

As traumatic as my life with Scrupulosity was, remembering it and then seeing how far I’ve come gives me hope that someday, I’ll get to a place where the pain no longer haunts me.

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