PANDAS & Lyme: My Recovery and 8 Years of Misdiagnoses

Posts tagged ‘Healthcare’

Why I Almost Quit Lyme Treatment

I pretty much take an entire pharmacy every day

 

On Thursday morning, I woke up and immediately knew something was very wrong. My whole body ached. I had an awful headache. I was dizzy. I was too nauseous to even think about food or water. It was that familiar set of symptoms that meant one thing: I was in for a terrible Lyme herx.

The last two weeks of symptoms flashed in my mind… The severe anxiety that gave me a panic attack over leaving the house. The lack of concentration and mental energy that meant falling behind in school. The incessant partial seizures that made me nervous every time I stood up to walk. I hadn’t even been in such bad shape when I started being treated for Lyme in December.

What are these doctors doing to me? Why am I putting up with this? I realized that morning that my treatments were only making me sicker.

As I eventually got to the kitchen, I sat there and stared down my antibiotics—the perpetrators of these all-too-frequent Herxheimer reactions that seem to be slowly ruining my life.

I can’t do this anymore…

I stopped my Lyme protocol for several days, because the thought of getting any worse than I already was seemed unbearable. Last semester, my quality of life, even if I still had PANS flares, had been much better. I’ve missed so many days of class this semester, thanks to herxes that leave me too weak and sick to get out of bed. I thought if I took a break from my protocol, maybe life could go back to how it was before.

But unfortunately, my strong reactions to the treatments show that they’re killing off a lot of bacteria—in other words, my misery is proof that I need to keep going.  And last summer, Lyme disease attacked my heart and nervous system, and there are still spirochetes in my brain—who knows what they could do to me over time?

I can’t quit. Whether I like it or not, this disease is trying to take my life, and if I want to live, I have to fight back.

After a couple of days of lying around the house and feeling terrible from the herx, plus a lot of kicking and screaming, I finally accepted this battle I’ve been given. I shed more than a few tears, finally realizing that I may have another year or more of Lyme treatment before I’m cured. I felt anger and rage that I’m spending my twenties in a health crisis—after already having PANS for a decade. But I’m channeling that anger into a will to fight to get better.

I almost quit treatment because I was tired of feeling worse. I kept going because I wanted to live.

Lyme Disease: A Still, Silent Battle

2 antibiotics, 3 medications, and 6 supplements: my weapons of choice against Lyme disease

2 antibiotics, 3 other meds, and 8 supplements: my weapons of choice against Lyme

“It’s Lyme disease.”

They were three words that shattered all of my expectations for recovery from PANS… Three words that I still struggle to accept… Three words that are going to change my life…

The other week, I was officially diagnosed with Lyme and some co-infections (Babesia and Relapsing Fever, in my case) at a Lyme treatment center. Apparently, it’s Lyme and the co-infections that are continuing to provoke my immune system and cause me to flare and not quite get all the way better.

While it’s great to have more answers, I found out other things I didn’t want to know…

In addition to my usual brain inflammation, the Lyme doctor discovered that my nerves are inflamed, and my spleen is enlarged from working so hard to fight off the infections. Also, I’ve almost completely lost my patellar reflex—when they took the rubber hammer to my knees, nothing moved—potentially a sign of a serious problem.  The “shin splints” that I can’t seem to heal may be bone pain from the infections.  Most frightening of all, my knee-buckling attacks (which I’ve had for two years) may be atonic seizures.

After the trip to the Lyme specialist, I was reeling for days, which is why I haven’t been able to post until now. Physically, I haven’t felt like a sick person at all—I have none of the aches and pains that so many people with Lyme experience, so realizing I was indeed quite physically ill came as a shock to me.

Moreover, I’d been hoping to be done with PANS soon, but I’m now told I’ll most likely need Lyme treatment for at least another year. And if it really takes that long to clear the infections, I don’t think I can expect to be free from PANS until they’re gone, either, can I?

So what can I do? I’m beyond tired of fighting for my life, because I’ve had PANS for ten years (untreated for eight of them), and I’ve especially been fighting hard over the last few months because of this Lyme-triggered relapse. Plus, trying to conquer an eating disorder brought on by all of this has taken its toll on me. But now, they’ve told me that I must also fight against Lyme somehow? How many battles can one person fight at once?

But one evening this week, when I was feeling particularly depressed about my situation, I came across a Bible verse that really spoke to my battle fatigue:

“The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still” (Exodus 14:14).

In reality, for now, “Fighting Lyme,” is nothing more than adding another antibiotic and a few more supplements and continuing to do my best to live a healthy life. To fight Lyme, I only have to be still and wait for these treatments to work. Fighting Lyme changes absolutely nothing about my day-to-day life—except that eventually, it will get better and easier when I beat it into submission.

Although it may seem like Lyme is a whole other terrifying monster to try to subdue, when I was done with my shock and denial, I realized that fighting Lyme isn’t actually much different from fighting PANS. “Being still” and waiting for treatments to work is exactly what I’ve been doing for PANS for the last two years, but now, I’ll be eliminating the infection that triggered this whole relapse in the first place. So really, the diagnosis is a good thing, because I have a more concrete plan for how to recover from both PANS and Lyme.

And so, readers, it looks like you’re going to get at least another year of posts out of me, thanks to this long Lyme treatment process. Two weeks in, I’ve already made leaps and bounds—I’m concentrating better and no longer have suicidal thoughts—so with any luck, 2017 will be the year that you and I all beat PANS and Lyme once and for all.

Thanks for all of your support, particularly through my 2016 relapse. Here’s to a better 2017!

IVIG #3: Third Time’s a Charm

Could IVIG #3 be the end of PANS for me?

Could IVIG #3 be the end of PANS for me?

Today, just two weeks after my third IVIG, I’m happy to say I’ve made tremendous progress. I’m no longer afraid of food and calories, so I’ve probably gained back about half of the weight I lost. I’ve gotten strong enough to run (slowly). My POTS symptoms are basically gone, and my parents have told me that there’s life in my eyes again. Oh, and I’ve even finished all of the summer coursework for the classes I had to take incompletes in—including a twelve-page research paper!

So am I better now? Is life perfectly peachy now that I’ve had IVIG?

Not even close.

As I’ve said in the past, IVIG is really only the beginning of recovery—not the end. I spent much of the summer trying to hold myself together long enough to make it to IVIG, but now that it’s over and I continue to struggle, I’m realizing I still have to keep holding myself together. It’s not like you get IVIG and then you’re better. No, it can be up to a year before IVIG has its full effect.

I’m no stranger to this long healing process, though—this is my third time going through it. But of course, I don’t like to think about how long it can take to get better and what it entails. I’m not going to lie to those of you out there doing this for the first time… It’s hard—but so worth it in the end.

Some days and weeks, you might do extremely well and maybe even forget PANDAS is part of your life. Others, you might be worse than you were before IVIG. But a lot of the time, you won’t be sure if IVIG has done much good at all. Yet the truth is, if it’s working (and it does fail 10-15% of the time), it’s probably working so slowly that you can’t even tell. Blogging and keeping track of symptoms has helped me in the past, because it’s given me reference points for comparison that showed me I was getting better, even if I didn’t feel like it.

Every IVIG is different, however, because it’s always a unique set of people’s antibodies, and you never know how your body will respond to them. (This is one reason it sometimes fails.)  You and I will have unique experiences with our different IVIGs.

Each time I’ve had this treatment, it’s taken a different amount of time to work. The first time, it was two months, and then it stopped working another two months later. The second time, I improved some right away, but it was nine months and a tonsillectomy later when I felt like my symptoms no longer interfered with my life. This time, I’ve also improved right away, but now I have to wait to see what happens next.

I know this might be a long and difficult journey, but I’m not afraid of it, and I’m optimistic that I’m going to beat PANS for good this time around. I’ve already made huge progress. Plus, my doctor says she’s finding IVIG to be more effective when you don’t have tonsils/adenoids like I don’t.

I can’t know what the future holds, but I’m choosing to believe that, when it comes to me and IVIG, the third time’s a charm.

POTS & PANS: A Recipe for Disaster?

My body is cooking up trouble with POTS and PANS

My body is cooking up trouble with POTS and PANS

“You’re going to hate me when I tell you this,” my cardiologist said this week.

I braced myself to be told my heart was damaged from Rheumatic Fever—or to be told my symptoms were all in my head, as so many doctors had said over the years…

“Your heart is fine—in fact, we haven’t seen one this perfect in years.”

Relief washed over me for a moment—until I remembered how my pulse had shot up when I stood for a test a few minutes earlier. The look on my doctor’s face told me I wasn’t imagining my symptoms.  What I’d feared most was true:

“You have… Dysautonomia.”

Dysautonomia is a fancy word for when a person’s autonomic nervous system (ANS) malfunctions. It can be caused by infection, autoimmune disease, or environmental triggers. The kind I have is called POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome).

My doctor explained that whatever illness I had in April triggered a malfunction in the part of my ANS that regulates blood pressure and heart rate. So now, whenever I stand up, my heart starts beating very fast because not enough blood is returning to it; blood pools in my legs instead, so I get lightheaded and dizzy. Not surprisingly, this leaves me exhausted all the time.

“You can recover from this,” he explained. “But it’s going to take a lot of courage and time—possibly two or three years.”

I left the appointment that day with my head spinning—not from a lack of blood flow, but from the realization that my world had, once again, been turned upside down. For weeks, I’d hoped to find a simple cause to my fatigue with a simple fix. Instead, I got yet another diagnosis that doctors are only beginning to understand—another condition like PANS that could take a long time to defeat.

Although there are medications such as beta-blockers that can help POTS, for now, my treatment plan is to take in more salt (about 5000 mg of sodium each day), drink more water (2-3 liters), and slowly ease my way back into exercise. I also need to be sure I sleep enough and eat well (easier said than done while fighting an eating disorder).

To be honest, I’m still a bit in shock over this latest diagnosis and what it means for the months to follow. But at the same time, I’m really not surprised that my body once again had a strange reaction to a virus—albeit in a new way.

Frankly, I see POTS and PANS as related, because my POTS came on at the same time that my PANS symptoms started getting bad again. Indeed, my PANS doctor told me many of her patients have both POTS and PANS—a true recipe for misery and disaster.

Because of this, I wanted to make you all aware of POTS.  Symptoms include:

  • Rapid heart rate when standing or sitting up
  • Dizziness (especially when standing)
  • Lightheadedness
  • Fainting or almost fainting
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Feeling heaviness in your legs
  • Headaches

For most people, proper treatment can lead to significant improvement, so it’s important to get a diagnosis. You can read more about POTS and other kinds of dysautonomia here: http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID=30

I’m still trying to process what happened this week, but I refuse to accept POTS as a permanent part of my life. However, the cardiologist told me if I don’t fight POTS now, it will get worse, so I’m going to keep pushing forward one day at a time—I’m determined to find a recipe to overcome both POTS and PANS.

Why Antibiotics Are Necessary for PANS

Sometimes, you have to try a few antibiotics for PANS before you find the right one.

Sometimes, you have to try a few antibiotics for PANS before you find the right one.

Since being diagnosed with PANS, I’ve been on antibiotics for twenty months straight, save for one two-week break. I’ll continue until six months after my last symptom, or at the very least, through my senior year of college.

Over these months, I’ve tried a variety of antibiotics, including Augmentin XR and Cefdinir, but it was switching to Azithromycin in October that I believe was the final blow to my illness. The few mild symptoms that remain have little effect on my life.

Yet some critics might say that my taking antibiotics for twenty months is reckless—that I’m contributing to antibiotic resistance and an inevitable super-bug apocalypse. But these are the same doctors who will give a six-year-old anti-psychotics without investigating infectious triggers. So who’s the reckless one: the doctor who loads up a kindergartener on Abilify without running diagnostic tests, or the doctor who’s prescribing a year of Azithromycin, knowing it will keep me sane and healthy? Is it reckless to properly treat the underlying cause of a debilitating and potentially life-threatening illness?

Nevertheless, some skeptics argue that antibiotics merely have a placebo effect—that people are seeing a relationship between symptoms and antibiotics that doesn’t exist. But anyone who has PANDAS or who’s lived with a PANDAS child for any length of time may have observed the pattern of improvement with antibiotics over and over again—and knows it would be unscientific to claim these observations as mere coincidence.

But what about antibiotic resistance? What about the fact that antibiotics kill off beneficial gut bacteria? What about yeast infections? If PANDAS is just “sudden-onset pediatric OCD,” why not give kids an SSRI and send them to therapy? Why not treat the tics with some anti-psychotics? Surely long-term antibiotics are unhealthy, right?

If PANS could be effectively treated with therapy and anti-psychotics and SSRI’s alone, the PANS community would settle down and crowd into the offices of mainstream doctors, the kids would get better, and the families would go on thriving. But this isn’t the case. Treating infections is the most crucial part of recovering from PANS, because the infections are what trigger the symptoms in the first place. Any ongoing infections will continually provoke the immune system to create the antibodies that attack the brain and lead to symptoms. Thus, the infections need to be dealt with for healing to occur, and they need to be prevented for it to continue.

As for antibiotic resistance, more than half the antibiotics used in America are for agriculture. We should be worried about all the livestock being given antibiotics for non-therapeutic purposes—not kids with PANDAS who take amoxicillan to stop bad antibodies from attacking their brains. Some people with PANDAS are literally dying. I would argue that they need antibiotics as much as someone with life-threatening bacterial pneumonia, for which no one ever questions the use of antibiotics.

But surely after twenty months of antibiotics, my gut flora is a wreck, isn’t it? Seeing as I’ve never had a yeast infection or diarrhea or nausea during this whole time, I’d say I’m just fine. In fact, I had stomach issues before I started antibiotics that have since resolved. I’m not alone in this—I’ve heard similar reports from many other families. (All this being said, yes, I do take a probiotic everyday—with 30 billion live cultures.)

Antibiotics are a critical part in the healing process of PANS. For some, they may be the only treatment needed. For others, they’re one of many therapies that work together.

If you’re just starting on the road of antibiotic treatment, my best advice would be to realize that it can take time for PANDAS symptoms to die down. In some cases, you get worse before you get better.

Antibiotics are still drugs with risks, and using them shouldn’t be taken lightly. However, with PANDAS, the bigger risk is often to leave the trigger of the disease untreated.

Why PANDAS Awareness Matters

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As I made my way through the halls to my neurologist’s office last May, I stopped in my tracks as I saw a face I recognized. She was receiving IVIG and roaming the halls hooked up to an IV bag pole, accompanied by her mother and a nurse. She was exhausted. There was no light in her eyes. She had a sense of burden and deep sadness about her that penetrated to the depths of her soul.

Once you’ve seen the face of a child with PANDAS, you can never forget it.

Over the last year, I’ve heard so many heartbreaking stories about what this illness can do. I’ve seen the look of terror in children’s faces and the grief and weariness in the parents’ eyes. I’ve watched as my own life fell apart, flare by flare, and I’ve spent what should’ve been my best years wanting nothing more than to find my lost mind.

Although PANDAS and PANS are curable, getting a diagnosis, let alone proper treatment, is far too difficult. It took me eight years to find an answer. It took me declining so much that I could longer walk, lost twelve pounds in two weeks (that I absolutely didn’t have to lose), and was psych-ward-worthy depressed and suicidal before doctors finally admitted that there could be a single cause to an alleged list of seven different syndromes and illnesses.

And I am one of the lucky ones.

My story has a happy ending. After two IVIG’s, a tonsillectomy, and a year of antibiotics and steroids, today, though I still have symptoms and take medications, I have my life back. I’m living independently, attending a prestigious university, earning straight-A’s, and making my mark in my chosen field. But without treatment, I would still be spending my days homebound, sleeping for up to twenty hours each day, unable to walk, and constantly watched by my parents so I wouldn’t hurt myself.

Sadly, my story may still be the exception—not because PANDAS is rare, but because it is common and many people may never receive a diagnosis. PANDAS/PANS is likely responsible for as much as 25% of cases of childhood OCD and Tourette’s. As many as 1 in 200 children may have this devastating condition. While some may outgrow it, for others like me, left untreated, it could lead to a lifetime of mental illness and disability.

To make matters worse, there are only a handful of doctors in the US who are considered to be experts in treating PANDAS and PANS. Their practices are overrun with cases. Waiting lists can be long. And when you finally do get an appointment and a diagnosis, treatments such as IVIG and plasmapheresis are outrageously expensive and are often not completely covered by insurance. If you’re fortunate, antibiotics might be enough to put you into remission, but sometimes, insurance won’t cover these, either.

While thousands of children and families are suffering, too many doctors are debating whether this condition even exists. Many doctors have the nerve to send families on their way, blaming debilitating symptoms on “bad parenting” or “school stress.” If we had a dime for every time we were told PANDAS is “controversial” or “not well understood,” perhaps we could pay for our IVIG treatments!

387,000 children in America (1 in 200) need treatment and shouldn’t have to travel hundreds of miles just to find a doctor who won’t dismiss their symptoms. Tens of thousands still just need answers.

October 9th is PANDAS/PANS Awareness Day. Help us raise awareness. Help us tell more doctors and psychologists so that it doesn’t take so many years of suffering to get a diagnosis. Help us get more insurance companies to recognize PANS and cover more treatments so that more patients can get the care they need.

PANDAS/PANS needs awareness because that sad girl in the hallway is in every elementary school across America—yet many of her may never know why she suddenly lost her joy and personality.

I believe that if those of us who have been diagnosed keep making noise, there will be a day when it is unheard of for a doctor to deny the existence of such a devastating syndrome. I believe there will be a day when the only thing parents have to worry about when their child gets PANS is helping him get better—not finding a believing doctor, not wondering how they can bring a terrified and uncontrollable child across the country for a consultation, and not paying for treatment.

But until then, I will keep writing and raising awareness, because for so many, that day can’t come soon enough.

PANS Symptoms Pic-small

PANS/PANDAS is an autoimmune reaction triggered by Strep, Pneumonia, Lyme, Mono, Stress, etc. resulting in an acute onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms that can include: separation anxiety, OCD, tics, age regression, ADHD, sleep difficulties, personality changes, urinary feequency, irritability, rage, sensory sensitivities, deterioration in learning abilities, and anorexia.

What I Wish I Knew Before IVIG

There are some things doctors don't tell you about recovery...

There are some things doctors don’t tell you about recovery…

Last week, I celebrated the one-year mark since my first IVIG. It’s hard to believe it’s already been a year, yet my recovery has seemed to go so much slower than I thought it would.

There are many things that no one ever told me before my first IVIG. I was warned about the fatigue and nausea and headaches afterward and the post-IVIG flare that would come in a few weeks. I was even warned it could take a year before all my symptoms went away, but I was never told what that year might be like.

So I decided to write a letter to my pre-IVIG self. Everyone has a different recovery road. Some people heal in less time than I’ve taken, and others take longer. This is what I would’ve found helpful, but I’d love to know what my fellow PANS warriors wish they’d known before treatment, too…

Dear Me,

You’re in for a crazy ride. You’re sick right now (and don’t even realize how bad it is), but you’re going to get better. You’re going to return to yourself. There will come a day when you are tormented no more. There will come a day when you enjoy your life again. There will come a day when you can spend time with your friends. There will come a day when you are able to eat without getting nauseous and anxious. There will come a day when you don’t have involuntary movements during every waking moment.

But it’s going to be a hard journey that will require you to fight harder than you think you can fight. Along the way, you will have awful flares. You will have times when you are terrified of yourself again. You will have times when you want to give up. You will have times when you will be mad at your parents for wanting to save you. But you’re stronger than you’d ever dare to believe, and you’re going to come out of this more alive than you were before you got ill.

During those times when you seem to be getting worse or going in circles, remember that there isn’t a straight path to recovery. Sometimes, you will take two steps forward and one step back. Other times, you will take two steps back and one step forward. IVIG is the beginning of recovery—not the end. Unfortunately, recovery doesn’t happen overnight like the onset of PANS—it often happens so slowly that you won’t notice you’re getting much better.

Still, even if you know you’re moving forward and that PANS isn’t a permanent illness, there will be moments when you’ll be sure you can’t go on another day. When you feel like that, take some ibuprofen and remember how far you’ve already come. If you’ve made it this far, you can make it the rest of the way to healing.

It will be a long road, and you’re going to feel sad and angry and confused sometimes. Lean on the people who care about you, and don’t look down on yourself for fighting this disease. It isn’t your fault. Give yourself permission to take it easy, and don’t feel bad about it. You are battling a serious illness, and your body needs rest in order to heal.

There will be a lot of days when you don’t feel like yourself, but you are still in there. You are ill, but you are not broken or any less of a person for having this disease. Don’t give up. Better days ahead.

“You’re Better.”

It's a new day!

Everything is different now, like a new day

 “You’re better.”

Those are two words I never thought I’d hear from my doctor. But this week, I finally did.

As my mom and I made the trip to my doctor’s office this week, I couldn’t help but feel that things were different this time—and most of all, that I was different. I was more present. I was more aware. I was bright-eyed again. I was finally myself.

This time, unlike my last visit in May, I opened the office doors myself, grabbing the handles without flinching. I pushed the elevator buttons. I sat in the waiting room chairs without thinking about Lysoling myself when I got home. I realized that contamination OCD was finally letting me go.

As I waited and heard the beeps from the IVIG pumps of other patients in the rooms down the hall, I figured out that it was a year ago to the day that I was sitting in those same infusion chairs for the first time.

But one year, a tonsillectomy, and an additional IVIG later, I’d returned—literally and mentally.

My transformation over the last year has been nothing short of miraculous. Last summer, I could hardly walk, I couldn’t eat much, I couldn’t stay awake, and I could never be still because I constantly had involuntary movements. In those days, I would look in the mirror and be frightened, because the person staring back at me wasn’t me—it was a burdened soul whose face showed the deepest torment and despair. It was someone who only looked like me, who carried the weight of the world in a malnourished body.

But when it was my turn to see the doctor this week, after I reported on my lack of symptoms and the strange tonsil infection that was no more, and after she saw that the dark cloud that once enveloped me was gone, I received the pronouncement I’ve dreamed of for the last year:

“You’re better.”

I’ve known I was 95% symptom-free for a few weeks, but to have a doctor say so made the elation and amazement finally hit me. Better… In remission… Done with this terrible disease… How can it be for real?

As for the other 5%, I still look forward to getting it back. I’ve been having trouble with speech and word retrieval lately. Sometimes, sentences come out of my mouth as nonsense syllables with the rhythm and tone of normal speech, and the English words I do say aren’t always the right ones. Sometimes, I have a hard time comprehending what I read or what people say to me.  Sometimes, I still get tics, and once in a blue moon, I fall down when I walk from my legs giving out.

“Executive function problems and movement issues are often the last things to leave,” my neurologist said. But the fact that I have so few other symptoms and have improved so dramatically after tonsillectomy suggests that it’s only a matter of time before I get to 100%.

If all goes as planned, I won’t be going back for any more follow-ups for another year, and I’ll be continuing on antibiotics, Plaquenil (an anti-inflammatory), Wellbutrin, and the same vitamins/supplements at least through this next year. But I’m tapering off Prednisone for good now!

It’s hard to believe that I’m 95% symptom-free, in remission, and not expected to relapse. I’m shocked to think that my nine-year nightmare is finally coming to an end.  Most of all, I’m so relieved and grateful.

To anyone out there who thinks they’ll never recover from PANS… Keep fighting, and you’ll get there, no matter how hopeless it seems right now. Don’t give up. Someday, you, too, will hear those powerful words: You’re better.

Tonsillectomy and… Hope?

So Many Popsicles

My breakfast, lunch, and dinner!

When I first found out that I needed a tonsillectomy, I made three appointments with three different doctors at two hospitals. While this may sound excessive, based on past experiences, I knew the first doctor or two might refuse to do the surgery as soon as I mentioned PANDAS, especially since my tonsils looked healthy on the outside.

Indeed, when my records were sent to the first doctor, my appointment was cancelled within two hours and my case passed to a different doctor in the practice.

Sadly, more often than not, telling a doctor you have PANDAS is just asking to be laughed at and dismissed. Many doctors don’t believe in PANDAS (let alone the newer term PANS) because they’re unaware of the growing research and evidence, and others don’t know enough to take it seriously.

Most doctors, if they believe PANDAS/PANS exists at all, assume it is extremely rare and only presents in a young child as an obvious, overnight onset of OCD. This is certainly the most common presentation, but according to Dr. Swedo, the idea that PANDAS only exists in prepubescent children was an arbitrary distinction for the original study. Still, in the minds of most doctors, to have me, a twenty-year-old, say I have this obscure pediatric disorder is preposterous (never mind that it started before I hit puberty).

While my case being dropped by the first doctor seemed like a bad sign, when I met with the new doctor at my appointment, he knew more about PANDAS than most and actually agreed to do the surgery after I told my story and explained the severity of my symptoms.

So that’s how I found myself last week trustingly lying in an operating room at the same hospital that had failed me so many other times over the years.

This was the hospital that discharged me from the ER last summer without a single test when I suddenly had severe chorea movements. This was the hospital whose neurologists had said PANDAS was “too poorly understood” to be considered as an explanation for my rapid decline. This was the hospital whose psychologists completely missed my severe OCD when I was twelve. Disturbingly, this was also the hospital consistently ranked as one of the best in the nation.

But last week, the hospital redeemed itself to me.

As I waited in the pre-op room, sniffing, grunting, and twitching involuntarily from my latest tics, I actually felt as though everyone not only believed me, but actually wanted to help me. I usually feel like I have to fight for every little bit of care I get, but this time, they were fighting for me. This time, I didn’t have to partially cover up my diagnosis by only saying I have Autoimmune Encephalitis (but not PANS). Everyone knew my full diagnosis, but they were all-the-more eager to help.

My operating room was crowded with residents, interns, and medical school students trying to get a look at this unusual creature—this real, live PANDA bear—because they saw that we exist outside of a “theoretical disease” briefly mentioned in their textbooks. There were whispers of my case in the halls—not because they were mocking my diagnosis as usual, but because they were fascinated. These young doctors genuinely wanted to learn about PANDAS/PANS so that someday, they could perhaps know how to treat their own patients with the disorder.

For the first time, doctors at a regular hospital were giving my illness the attention it deserves—and giving me the treatment I needed.

If there’s one word I felt to describe the day, it would be “hope.” I felt hope because more doctors finally believed in my disease. I felt hope that someday, other PANDA’s from my hometown wouldn’t have to travel to out-of-town specialists for treatment—someday our own “world-class” hospital might treat more of us. Most of all, I felt hope that I had finally found the treatment that would bring me back the rest of the way…

Ever since I came out of surgery, I haven’t had a single tic.  The day before, I’d developed two new vocal tics that got more and more disruptive as the day went on.  I know—tics usually increase with anxiety.  But why have I also found myself suddenly carrying out fewer and fewer compulsions this week—and not getting extremely anxious over not doing them?

As always, there are a lot of variables at work.  Still, I can’t deny that, aside from a sore, gnarly-looking throat and fatigue from leftover anesthesia, I’m feeling great in every other way.  (And I’m not in nearly as much pain as people tried to scare me into thinking I’d be in.)  To me, what happened this week is a good enough reason to keep hoping for continuing progress.

My First “Normal” Summer?

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This week, I have wonderful news… Instead of moving home for the summer like I’d planned, I’ve decided to remain at school to take classes and work.

While this may sound like a “normal” summer for an almost-20-year-old, for me, it’s a huge victory. Not too long ago, I hated everything and wanted nothing more than to go home and spend my summer lying on the couch or in bed (just like last summer). But now, I want to keep pursuing my dreams in this city—dreams that I’d pushed to the back burner for far too long because of my illness.

When I called my parents yesterday to inform them of my decision, I didn’t know how they’d react. I thought they might try to make me change my mind, but instead, they said my plans were, “the best news ever.”

“I feel great,” I said on the phone. “Really great.”

“How’s your OCD?” my mom asked.

And there was a long pause…

Recently, I’ve been having a hard time with sensory sensitivities.  If I feel certain sensations or see certain textures or hear certain sounds, I’m thrown into a flurry of compulsions and tics to try to get rid of the physical discomfort.

For example, I can’t stand it when my feet rub across the floor or the ground in a certain way. If it happens, I have to go “undo” it by stepping on the same spot again or rubbing something else in a “good” way.  Just thinking about the noise and the sensation makes me very anxious. When it gets really severe, sometimes I won’t move until I can convince myself that it wouldn’t be “that bad” if I accidentally made the sound happen.

“Well, mom,” I said, “It’s gotten to the point where I’ve considered putting rubber mats on top of all the carpet in the apartment…” (For some reason, sliding on rubber or plastic doesn’t bother me nearly as much.)

“That’s not good.”

“Yeah, I know. And then I had a couple of days when I could hardly eat… And I’m sleeping terribly and can’t stay awake without Provigil… And then there’s the ADD…”

“Well, what’s so great about how you’re feeling now?”

It’s very hard for me to identify what it is, much more to explain it, but I feel a night-and-day improvement compared to where I was before my most recent IVIG. I’ve previously written about how my perception of the world and my awareness has improved, but to put it another way:

I may still have symptoms, but my symptoms don’t have me.

I’m not completely consumed by this disease anymore. I have a life that isn’t just about fighting PANDAS. I’m doing everything I want to be doing—even if it takes me longer than most people, and even if it takes more effort. Yes, having PANS causes significant difficulties, but I’ve learned how to work around them somewhat, and I’ve come to accept my life for what it is right now.

Certainly, I’d prefer to not have any of the challenges that I have. I want this IVIG to take care of everything that’s left. I don’t want to be tossed into the throws of partial insanity when I finish my Prednisone taper next month (I’m down to 8mg now!). I want to stay at school over the summer like I’ve planned—and not in isolation at home after a plasmapheresis hospital stay.

But I suppose if push comes to shove, I still want to be cured more than anything else, so I’d go home for treatment this summer if I needed it…

For now, though, I’m going to keep living as if I’ll get to have a “normal” summer, because I like looking forward to something normal—even though I know there’s a possibility that I’ll have no choice but to go home…

What’s It Like to Survive a Flare?

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This week, I finally hit the post-IVIG flare that we were all dreading.  Thanks to a six-day burst of high-dose Prednisone, I’ve come out of it now, but I hope I don’t have to go through that ever again.  Unfortunately, I probably will.

Until my most recent IVIG, my flares were getting worse and worse.  One night a few weeks ago, I found myself spacing out at the kitchen table for about two hours, unable to make myself get up, because I had too many OCD compulsions. When I realized I’d been doing nothing for two hours and thought about how hard it would be to do anything with the burden of OCD, I just lost it—I spent twenty minutes walking around my apartment screaming and hitting the walls.

On another night, I similarly started screaming, but then ran outside and sprinted for half a mile in the rain at 1:30 in the morning. Shapes were rising out of the bushes during the run—shadows were everywhere… I realized I was hallucinating.

This week’s flare wasn’t nearly as bad—my latest IVIG seems to be damping things down.  This time around, my flare consisted of depression, feeling detached from everything and being “out-of-it,” some of the worst tics and choreiform movements since the summer, bad memory problems, and crying about everything for no reason.  The flare wasn’t pleasant, but at least I wasn’t hallucinating.

At this point, I’ve become a master of knowing when I’m about to flare. It’s true that all my flares happen very suddenly, but there are a few warning signs…

The first clue for me is that I start to have a hard time making myself do anything in the hours leading up to the flare. I lose interest in things. If I’ve made plans, I cancel them if at all possible. It’s almost like my body knows it needs to conserve energy to brace for the coming battle—before I consciously know it’s coming.

The second clue is that my physical pain suddenly gets worse. As a result of another condition called Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, I’m almost always in some amount of pain, but this is different. I start to get this strange, dull ache all across the backs of my arms and sometimes in my legs, too.  Before this week’s flare, I went to bed and had that pain in my arms and thought a flare would be coming. The next morning, I had no other signs of flaring, but sure enough, that afternoon, I fell off the cliff.

Another sign of a coming flare is that my cognitive issues suddenly get worse—especially the word-finding problems.  I don’t know the names of everyday objects.  I try to articulate myself, but I say things in the wrong order and get the tenses of my verbs wrong. Sometimes I know how I want to say something, but it doesn’t come out of my mouth that way.  I find that increased word-finding difficulties might happen only a few minutes before the worst of the flare.

But what’s it like to experience a flare?  The tics and other movements are obvious. You can see the “look of terror” I get with my widened eyes. You can watch me having a panic attack. You can hear me yelling at my parents. You can notice me doing more compulsions than usual. If you could read my mind, you’d know that the looping, intrusive thoughts start happening much more often. But it’s more than all of that—flaring feels like losing yourself.  It’s like something outside of yourself takes control and snatches who you are away.

When I flare, it feels like someone is taking things out of my mind and hiding them—and refusing to tell me how to get anything back.  I look for the words to speak, but this monster has set them up in a high place I cannot reach. I try to remember what happened the week before, who that familiar face is that I’ve seen hundreds of times, or even what I was in the middle of doing, but it has all been stolen out of my mind, and I don’t know where the monster has put any of it—I just know it’s all gone.

When I flare, it feels like I’m living in another world, unable to traverse the chasm that is my mind in order to be with everyone else.  I know I can’t think clearly about anything, but I cannot specifically tell you what about me is “off.”  I may try to go about my day as usual, but the world doesn’t quite make sense, and I feel like I’m somewhere else. The scary thing is that I never know how far away I’ve been until I come back out of the flare—and then it’s like I have been away for a long time am rediscovering all the wonderful things about the world and the people around me.

Coming out of a flare is like getting the proper prescription at the eye doctor—you didn’t know what you had been missing until you saw clearly again. You knew things weren’t quite in focus, but you never could’ve imagined all the details you once missed—but now, everything seems even more beautiful since you can fully see it.

I often wonder how many more times I’ll have to go through these flares. I’m not myself at all when I flare, so I feel as though I’m living between the flares, hoping to have as full of a life as possible.  I go to college like everyone else. I have friends. I even make straight-A’s.  But I live with the constant reality that I could flare at any moment.

I try to live the life I want to live between the flares because when you never know when you’ll lose yourself next, you have to make the most of every moment and cherish each day that you get. I lose my perspective on everything when I flare, but if I can look at all I accomplish in the better times, I can maybe know on some level that I am still me—no matter how much each flare makes me feel otherwise.

IVIG #2: I’m Finally Aware

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I just finished my second, and hopefully last, IVIG treatment!

Recently, I’d been feeling like I’d made no progress with any of my symptoms after my first IVIG.  But strangely, it was the process of going back for another IVIG that showed me this was simply untrue.

When I had the first IVIG in August, if I got out of the chair to stand up and stretch my legs, I started doing a wild choreiform movement dance. I couldn’t even look at my doctor to talk to her because I was moving so much. I had to hold onto the IV bag pole to keep from falling down when I tried to walk down the hall to the bathroom.

This time, I hardly had any movements, and the ones I did have were barely noticeable to anyone besides me—except for when I took one spill in the hallway…

While my movement disorders have improved significantly, I’d say the main difference between last week and my August IVIG has been that, before my first IVIG, I don’t think I fully understood how serious this disease could be.

In August, I didn’t realize that, if it weren’t for the Prednisone burst that had brought me back a few weeks beforehand, I could’ve starved myself. It didn’t occur to me that if we hadn’t figured out I had PANS, I would’ve been locked up in a psych ward with constant monitoring so I wouldn’t hurt myself. I didn’t grasp that I needed IVIG to avoid a lifetime of mental illness, disability, and unimaginable suffering.

But now I get it.  Sometimes, it’s too much to process.  I simply cannot bear to think about what would’ve happened to me without treatment.  I nearly lost everything…

During the IVIG treatment this week, I was also well enough to understand how bad things still are—although it’s a good sign that I’m able to recognize this. I know that my general and social anxiety and OCD have been incapacitating, all of my executive functioning abilities are very poor, and everyday tasks are sometimes impossible.

But even if some of these symptoms aren’t much better than they were in August, my perception is much improved. It’s like someone has finally given me a pair of glasses for my mind, and I can finally see what I’ve been missing for so long. While it’s painful to know there’s so much I couldn’t see, it’s comforting to know I’m coming back in some ways.

Unfortunately, being more aware means I’m also able to worry more.  I worry because, if this IVIG doesn’t bring me back to 100%, I’ll be spending a month of my summer in isolation following a five-day plasmapheresis treatment in the hospital. If that fails, I’ll be going through Rituximab infusions—a form of chemotherapy.

I had big plans to take summer classes and get a job, but how can I plan anything when I have no idea whether I’ll be able to leave my house or not this summer? All I want is to not suffer so much—especially since I’m so conscious of my suffering now. I just want to be allowed to be myself.

Sometimes, I cannot sleep at night because I’m afraid I’ll never get back to who I am. Or even worse, I worry that I won’t know that I’m not completely better, and then I won’t get the treatment I need, and then I’ll slip into a relapse just as I’ve finally returned to a good life—and then I’ll go through this whole thing all over again.

But I don’t want to worry—I want to enjoy the improvements I’ve already seen after this second IVIG: my OCD almost completely disappeared overnight, my memory is much better, I’ve been able to contribute to discussions in my classes this week, and I’m even enjoying things again. This is wonderful, almost miraculous, news. Oh, that this trend would continue…

Bring Me Back

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As spring break approached, I did everything I could to avoid answering that dreaded question: “What are you doing over break?”

“Oh, I’m just taking a short trip to the city and then going home and resting,” I told most people.

But the whole truth is that I’ll be sitting in my doctor’s office for two days hooked up to an IV to get a bunch of people’s antibodies poured into my body. The truth is that I desperately need this treatment so that my own bad antibodies will stop attacking my brain. The truth is that I’m going for my second round of IVIG to hopefully wipe out this disease once and for all.

As I’ve listened to classmates discussing their cruises, beach outings, road trips, or even their plans to remain at school, I’ve found myself feeling resentful.  It isn’t the fact that I don’t get to spend the week on a beach with my friends—it’s the fact that I don’t have the freedom to choose not to do so.  My symptoms are severe enough that the only reasonable spring break for me is to get more treatment. What can I do? I have to go back for IVIG.

IVIG round 2––I'm partying so hard over spring break!

This is how I’m partying over spring break…

With so many emotions—hope, fear, anxiety, and more—I stepped into a cab after my last Friday class and headed to the airport to go home.  But it wasn’t that easy: my mom had to call the cab for me, because my social anxiety has been so bad lately.

Getting through the airport to go home was even more difficult because of my brain fog. These days, I walk around with a constant sense that I’ve forgotten to do something or that I’ve lost something. And sometimes, I get very confused by everyday things. Getting through an airport in that state was truly an accomplishment.

As I finally sat at my gate, amazed at how “off” and not completely present I was, I knew in my heart of hearts that, in spite of how much I wished to have a “normal” college spring break, it was time to go home.

Yes, I’m ready to be brought back. 

Oh, IVIG, please bring me home. Bring me back to who I am. Bring me back to the days when OCD didn’t force me to make everything “just right.” Bring me back to the days when I wasn’t afraid of everyone. Bring me back to the days when I wasn’t in constant pain. Bring back my memory. Bring back my concentration. Bring back my mental clarity. Bring back my mind. Bring back my health. Most of all, bring back my hope.

One way or another, I’m going home. It may not be this flight, this trip, and this treatment that gets me there, but somehow, I will find my way. I’m going to go home. Something, someday, will bring me back.

What I Learned from Losing My Wallet

Recently, I had the misfortune of losing my wallet. Anyone would be upset and worried about losing something that contained your credit and ATM cards, driver’s license, school ID, cash, car keys, and apartment keys. But I had another concern: as soon as you open my wallet, you can see a medical information card that gives away all kinds of personal health information.

If I were ever in an accident or had another emergency, it’s a good thing that this information is so easily accessible. But in this case, I couldn’t help but wonder who was going to read it. There’s no way whoever found my wallet wouldn’t see it. I had managed to keep my illness a complete secret from everyone but my close friends and professors, because I didn’t want to be treated differently. Would this be the day that everyone found out?

As soon as I got back to my apartment, reached for my keys, and realized my wallet wasn’t in its usual place, I set out on a trek across campus to retrace everywhere I had been that morning. I went to campus security and told them my plight. Nothing had been turned in. I went back to the classrooms I’d been in earlier in case it had fallen out when I sat at my seat. No luck.

Finally, I went to the front desk of one of the buildings where I’d had class. Without a word, the secretary handed me my wallet with a little smile. Nothing was even missing. Some kind, honest human being had turned it in.

What you need to understand is that, a few weeks prior, this secretary had given me a really hard time about being late to order some course materials. The school was trying to make only one order, but whenever stragglers like me missed the deadline, they had to place another one which cost more money. In all fairness, I shouldn’t have waited until the last minute, but when it was all I could do to just get out of bed in the morning and fight through crippling depression and extreme sleepiness all day long, ordering textbooks wasn’t really a top priority.

“You should have done this five weeks ago,” she said angrily that day. “Oh, you don’t have a checkbook with you? Go to the bank right now and get some cash.”

I wanted to cry. Do you have any idea what I’m going through right now? I thought to myself. If only you realized that I truly am doing the best I can. I never wanted to cause anyone any trouble. I wasn’t just being lazy and inconsiderate by waiting this long.

But ever since I lost my wallet, this woman seems to be treating me a bit more gently. I’m sure that she looked in my wallet and read my card. Now she does know what I’m going through.

I’ve often wondered what would happen if I carried that card on the outside for everyone to read. What if we all were more open about what we’re up against? I have frequently longed to just come out and tell everyone, “Hey, I have this awful disease. It sucks. Please give me some extra love.” But I haven’t. Maybe it’s time to rethink that…

When you live with an illness with such a profound impact on your life, there’s always a struggle between telling people what you’re dealing with so that they can understand you better and not telling people so that you can maintain a sense of privacy and maybe even forget that there’s anything wrong with you on the good days. I still haven’t figured it out.

While I certainly wish I had never gotten PANS, the one good thing it has done is make me a more compassionate person. I’ve come to realize that everyone has a card—struggles, difficulties, and bad circumstances that, if we knew about them, would explain some of the seemingly annoying or inconveniencing things people do. You rarely get to read someone else’s card, but I’ve learned to try to give people some grace, because I have so often wished for others to do the same for me.

I Officially Have PANDAS!

So I went to see a PANDAS specialist this week, and I’ve finally been diagnosed with PANDAS.  My doctor was wonderful and finally took my symptoms seriously.  She even said my mysterious illness from 2006-2007 may have been Rheumatic Fever. And unfortunately, she told me I’m not just having tics, but also chorea, which could explain my strange falls when I walk.  The best words my doctor said were, “You’re going to get better.”

She has put me back on Prednisone for six weeks along with a different antibiotic called Cefdinir.  I am in such a bad flare right now that she wants me to do IVIG as soon as possible. She was very troubled by everything I had been through and decided that eight years was long enough and we should just knock out the disease with the stronger method of IVIG treatment.  Plus, my movements have not improved at all with antibiotics.

I don’t even know what I feel right now.  I’ve waited so long for someone to tell me for sure what my illness was, and now someone did.  I still can’t believe it.  I’m ecstatic and terrified all at the same time…

I’m grateful, because most people with this condition never get a proper diagnosis. They estimate 160,000 people in America have my disorder, but it was only discovered in the late ’90’s, and only several thousand people have received a diagnosis. Many people suffer through years of treating the symptoms, only to have treatments fail. Now, I don’t have to do that for another single day.

I’m shocked, because having a diagnosis means there’s no way for me to deny to myself that things aren’t as bad as they really are. For months, I’ve coped by trying to tell myself that I don’t feel “that bad,” and I still haven’t fully processed what has happened to me. I’m still surprised every time I wake up in the morning, fall down, and realize again that I can’t fully control my movements. When a neurologist gives you a name for your condition, it’s like a Mack truck running you over with shock, because you realize that this is your reality right now.

I’m so, so happy, because I’ve been told I’m going to get better. For eight years, I thought I was stuck with all these crazy symptoms. I believed it was all just going to always be part of my existence. But now, I’ve been told it doesn’t have to be, and it’s an incredible feeling.

I’m worried, because I have to have IVIG in another week, and for 10-15%, it doesn’t work.

I’m scared, because they still know so little about this disorder. How do we really know I won’t relapse in a decade or so? Or even in another few months?

I’m sad, because now that someone has told me what has been wrong with me, I know that I’ve lost eight years of my life to a disease that could have been treated if it had been diagnosed sooner. Even after I’m better, I think I’m going to have to go to counseling to avoid PTSD…

I’m angry, because I can’t understand why any of it had to happen to me. Seriously, why me? And why does this happen to anyone? I am filled with grief when I consider how much pain it has caused me and when I realize there are thousands of others like me. It’s just too much. This has been a major struggle in my Christian faith lately. I’ve read the book of Job a lot, and I’ve just decided that there is no answer for now—there’s only trust in spite of my lack of understanding. That’s why it’s faith—because you don’t see signs or answers—not because you do perceive it with your eyes.

Most of all, I’m relieved, because I finally have an answer and a productive way forward. I’m in good hands with this new doctor, and even though it could take up to a year for me to recover completely, I truly believe that I will get better. Oh, and my doctor said that, given my response to steroids and antibiotics, there’s no way I have narcolepsy.  Phew.  Yes, my PANDAS diagnosis is wonderful news!

Is Looking at My Medical Records Really Too Much to Ask?

This week, I’m going to be seeing three neurologists including one PANDAS specialist. As you can imagine, I’m very nervous but also excited about the possibility of figuring out what has gone on with me for the past eight years. In order to prepare for the appointments, I’ve been trying to get my hands on my own medical records for awhile—with little success.  Forgive me, because I need to vent…

I don’t understand why it has to be so hard for me to look at some pieces of paper—pieces of paper with my personal information on them. The laws say that I have a right to do so. And as far as I’m concerned, they belong to me. Unfortunately, the administrators I’ve had to get in contact with have disagreed. One even had the nerve to tell me after I had explained my situation: “The records belong to us.”

These people were horrible. They hardly wanted to lift a finger to help me. All they cared about was how long they could get away with taking—as if what they’re dealing with was just another office job—nevermind that a person’s health is at stake.

I was eventually able to get the records from two of the three practices. Unfortunately, the third one has fourteen years of my records that include the time of my symptom onset, and they have been the worst to deal with by far. I’m considering taking an attorney with me when I go back, because some of what they told me sounds illegal. To give you an idea of how little they care, this is how the conversation went:

“I’ve been trying for awhile to get my medical records which were transferred to another practice a few years ago. They were very unhelpful and didn’t tell me they couldn’t release the ones from your practice along with theirs. I’m in a predicament because I have a specialist appointment out-of-town next week, and I need my records by Wednesday…”

“Legally, we have two weeks to get them to you.”

Are you kidding me? This is your response to someone who has just explained the nightmare they’ve been through at another practice? This is what you say to someone who’s just told you that they’re sick enough to need to go out-of-town for a specialist?

That’s wrong and unacceptable,” I said, trying to stay calm. “I’m sick, and I need them next week. Look, you have them sitting right there. Can I not copy them for you and take the copy?”

“No, we can’t do that.”

“I’m very ill, and I need my charts to get a proper diagnosis. Is there any way to expedite the process? I’ll pay extra.”

“No, by law we have up to two weeks to get you your records.”

“I don’t have two weeks. You have two weeks by law, but morally, why won’t you even try to help me get them sooner? Is there nothing you can do?”

“We have up to two weeks to get them to you.”

In a perfect world, I know there wouldn’t be such a rush to get my records, but that’s not how life worked out.  It would be one thing if that administrator had shown even a little bit of concern for my situation and told me she couldn’t do anything, but instead, she was a total jerk.  And I’m sure I’m not the only one who has been dealt with in this way. I pity every soul that’s stuck dealing with that woman on a regular basis because they see one of the doctors at that practice.  Who knows?  Maybe she’s crazy enough to surprise me by getting me my records before my appointment on Friday…

Takin’ Roids

I’m no doctor, but recent developments have shown I almost certainly have PANDAS or PANS.

A standard way to see if symptoms are autoimmune-related is to do a steroid burst for five days. The theory is that if inflammation is the culprit, the symptoms will improve with the steroids. It doesn’t work for some true PANDAS/PANS patients if there is still an active infection like Lyme or mycoplasma causing an exacerbation.

But it worked for me. I just finished a five-day burst of Prednisone with incredible results. By the third day, I did not need any Nuvigil to stay awake, and my concentration was so good that I was able to sit down and write a paper and take a test in a timely fashion with no brain fog. My tics and walking problems also significantly lessened, though didn’t completely go away. My depression vanished. It was amazing to feel normal again!

Dare I hope that I’m not actually narcoleptic? I don’t think people with narcolepsy can suddenly stop feeling sleepy during the day. Narcolepsy is an autoimmune condition caused by the destruction of a brain chemical called hypocretin. Once the chemical is destroyed, it can’t be regenerated. Hypocretin regulates wakefulness, so if the loss of it (narcolepsy) was what was causing my sleepiness, I should not suddenly feel this awake with no stimulants. I’ll see my sleep doctor next week, and he’s going to be shocked. I wonder what he’ll say about this…

The next step is treatment with an antibiotic called Augmentin. My doctor prescribed a high dose of it for thirty days, but I’m curious to see what the PANDAS specialists will say. In the next couple weeks, I’ll be seeing an immunologist and a neurologist that specialize in treating it. I should have seen them eight years ago, but how could we have known? I’m hoping and praying that I do not have permanent brain damage from unknowingly delaying treatment for so long. But these last five days of steroids give me hope that I will soon feel normal again….

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