PANDAS & Lyme: My Recovery and 8 Years of Misdiagnoses

Posts tagged ‘Medicine’

Why I Almost Quit Lyme Treatment

I pretty much take an entire pharmacy every day

 

On Thursday morning, I woke up and immediately knew something was very wrong. My whole body ached. I had an awful headache. I was dizzy. I was too nauseous to even think about food or water. It was that familiar set of symptoms that meant one thing: I was in for a terrible Lyme herx.

The last two weeks of symptoms flashed in my mind… The severe anxiety that gave me a panic attack over leaving the house. The lack of concentration and mental energy that meant falling behind in school. The incessant partial seizures that made me nervous every time I stood up to walk. I hadn’t even been in such bad shape when I started being treated for Lyme in December.

What are these doctors doing to me? Why am I putting up with this? I realized that morning that my treatments were only making me sicker.

As I eventually got to the kitchen, I sat there and stared down my antibiotics—the perpetrators of these all-too-frequent Herxheimer reactions that seem to be slowly ruining my life.

I can’t do this anymore…

I stopped my Lyme protocol for several days, because the thought of getting any worse than I already was seemed unbearable. Last semester, my quality of life, even if I still had PANS flares, had been much better. I’ve missed so many days of class this semester, thanks to herxes that leave me too weak and sick to get out of bed. I thought if I took a break from my protocol, maybe life could go back to how it was before.

But unfortunately, my strong reactions to the treatments show that they’re killing off a lot of bacteria—in other words, my misery is proof that I need to keep going.  And last summer, Lyme disease attacked my heart and nervous system, and there are still spirochetes in my brain—who knows what they could do to me over time?

I can’t quit. Whether I like it or not, this disease is trying to take my life, and if I want to live, I have to fight back.

After a couple of days of lying around the house and feeling terrible from the herx, plus a lot of kicking and screaming, I finally accepted this battle I’ve been given. I shed more than a few tears, finally realizing that I may have another year or more of Lyme treatment before I’m cured. I felt anger and rage that I’m spending my twenties in a health crisis—after already having PANS for a decade. But I’m channeling that anger into a will to fight to get better.

I almost quit treatment because I was tired of feeling worse. I kept going because I wanted to live.

Why I’m Working through PANS

Can someone with PANS/Lyme keep up in a competitive environment?

A couple weeks ago, I was elated to find out that I’d been accepted for a summer internship!  This wasn’t just any job offer, but a highly competitive internship that I’ve worked towards and dreamed about for years. It seemed so surreal that this door had finally opened!

Unfortunately, I quickly came crashing back into reality when I remembered how ill I’ve been lately. At the moment, my anxiety is so out-of-hand that it’s not clear how I’ll finish the semester, because I can hardly even start my assignments.  On top of this, I can barely walk without a mini-seizure causing my legs to collapse, and I’m having a difficult time speaking coherently.  If I’m this dysfunctional right now, how can I possibly hold down a job in a few more weeks?

I have had some really good days lately, too, but even then, I still live with a sense that my illness is following me like the bogie man, ready to jump out and attack at any moment. To me, one of the cruelest aspects of PANS is its unpredictability. Just as I think I’m healthy and in the clear, suddenly, it can overtake me again. I live on egg shells because I never know when PANS will strike next. I fear that I’m always one cold or infection or exposure to Strep away from the brink of insanity.

Even if I improve in the next few weeks, how can I do an internship this summer if I might lose myself any day, without warning?

Nevertheless, after ten years of PANS, I’m a race horse kicking at the gates; for too long, this illness has kept me locked up as I’ve watched everyone else take off without me. Now, this internship is my chance to tear through the doors and speed down the track. I have a life to live, and I’m not about to let PANS stop me.

So I accepted the offer.

At this point, I’m more terrified than excited, but you know what? I refuse to not try just because of the bad things that might happen. I know I may have to pace myself and guard my health more than the other interns. Even so, because I’ve become accustomed to the uncertainty of never knowing how long my symptoms will be in remission, I work very hard on every day that I’m able—apparently with higher-quality results than many other healthy people. If I’m well this summer, then I believe I will not only get through the job, but I will pass everything with flying colors.

I’ve long come to terms with the inevitable uncertainty of my condition, and day-by-day, I’ve been working through the difficulties and moving towards recovery—albeit much slower than I’d like at times. But now, I’m determined to keep working through PANS this summer, as this internship leads me toward my dreams.

In Response to Your Lyme Questions…

Ever since I announced my Lyme diagnosis, I’ve been inundated with questions from readers. While I’m not qualified to give anyone medical advice, I’ll gladly share my own personal experiences.  Given the number of messages I’ve received, I figured I should answer the most common questions in a post for all of you, so here you go:

What tests did you do?
Igenex Labs. Insurance may or may not cover these Lyme tests, but the standard CDC Lyme tests are highly inaccurate and very often give a false negative when a person actually does have Lyme. Even Igenex can give a false negative, but it misses fewer cases.

If you do get a positive Igenex result (like I did), it can make diagnosis easier.  Nevertheless, Lyme Disease is still considered a clinical diagnosis, so Lyme specialists won’t rely on tests alone to diagnose you—they’ll also consider symptoms and history.

Who ordered the tests?
In addition to my PANS specialist, I have a local GP who is easier to get in contact with, so my parents and I asked her to order Igenex. Although she doesn’t know a whole lot about Lyme or PANS, she’s been very open-minded and willing to try anything reasonable that might help me.  Basically, it was our idea, and she agreed to do it.

Why did you think to test for Lyme?
My PANS doctor told me a year and-a-half ago that it would be extremely unlikely for me to relapse ever again or to need more treatment. But guess what happened this spring? Arguably, this latest PANS exacerbation was my worst ever, which was totally unexpected at age 21, given that it’s supposed to be a pediatric condition.

We all knew this meant some major trigger must have been at work, and given how much time I spend outdoors, a tick-borne illness seemed reasonable.  Although I’d improved since my IVIG in the summer, it felt like there was a missing piece in the puzzle.  I’d heard from many readers that Lyme is common in people with PANS, so my team thought it was time to rule it in or out for sure.

Did you have a tick bite or the Lyme bull’s-eye rash? Do you remember getting sick?
Growing up playing in the woods, tick bites were a given, but I don’t remember having any over the last few years, and I never had a rash. But apparently, only about 50% of Lyme patients get the rash.  However, in the spring, I had a flu-like illness, and I was bedridden for days. Mentally and physically, I never fully recovered. Then, I had heart and nervous system issues (including POTS) that I’d never had before, followed by a descent into a horrific flare of PANS symptoms. It wasn’t the flu—it was Lyme.

Should I get tested for Lyme?
I’m not a doctor and don’t know your history, but if you’re not able to get all the way better with only PANS treatments, please talk to your doctor about Lyme.  Better yet, look into Lyme disease before you go way down the rabbit hole of autoimmune treatments.  While not everyone with PANDAS/PANS has Lyme, it’s still very common in people with PANDAS/PANS, along with its co-infections (Babesia, Bartonella, TBRF, Ehrlichea, etc). The sooner you get treatment for these infections, the better.

My Lyme specialist believes I’ve had Lyme for a decade (though I remain skeptical of this). I can’t help but wonder what my life would’ve been if I were properly tested ten years ago. Don’t make my mistake.

What are your treatments?
I take two antibiotics and seven different supplements/vitamins each day. I also follow a gluten/grain-free diet (almost Paleo) and detox with Burbur and Pinella. And of course, I still take a couple psychiatric drugs (Wellbutrin and Lamictal) to manage my symptoms in the meantime. Everyone’s treatment regimen is unique, though, so don’t be surprised if yours is quite different from mine!

What’s the prognosis?
Every person responds to Lyme disease and its treatments differently. Some people take weeks to heal, others take months, and I’ve heard of some people taking years. For me, I’m expected to be in treatment for the next year and-a-half, and then I’ll just be monitored. The doctor says someday, I’ll get completely better, and with any luck, when my Lyme is gone, my PANS will be, too.  But for now, I’m just taking it one day at a time…

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I hope this answered all of your questions!  If not, feel free to ask more in the comment section below.

Please, please, please look into Lyme disease if you have any symptoms that never seem to go away or that come and go in cycles. PANS is treatable, but sometimes, it’s complicated by Lyme. Just keep searching and hoping, and don’t give up.

For more information about Lyme, be sure to check out: http://ilads.org

Lyme Disease: A Still, Silent Battle

2 antibiotics, 3 medications, and 6 supplements: my weapons of choice against Lyme disease

2 antibiotics, 3 other meds, and 8 supplements: my weapons of choice against Lyme

“It’s Lyme disease.”

They were three words that shattered all of my expectations for recovery from PANS… Three words that I still struggle to accept… Three words that are going to change my life…

The other week, I was officially diagnosed with Lyme and some co-infections (Babesia and Relapsing Fever, in my case) at a Lyme treatment center. Apparently, it’s Lyme and the co-infections that are continuing to provoke my immune system and cause me to flare and not quite get all the way better.

While it’s great to have more answers, I found out other things I didn’t want to know…

In addition to my usual brain inflammation, the Lyme doctor discovered that my nerves are inflamed, and my spleen is enlarged from working so hard to fight off the infections. Also, I’ve almost completely lost my patellar reflex—when they took the rubber hammer to my knees, nothing moved—potentially a sign of a serious problem.  The “shin splints” that I can’t seem to heal may be bone pain from the infections.  Most frightening of all, my knee-buckling attacks (which I’ve had for two years) may be atonic seizures.

After the trip to the Lyme specialist, I was reeling for days, which is why I haven’t been able to post until now. Physically, I haven’t felt like a sick person at all—I have none of the aches and pains that so many people with Lyme experience, so realizing I was indeed quite physically ill came as a shock to me.

Moreover, I’d been hoping to be done with PANS soon, but I’m now told I’ll most likely need Lyme treatment for at least another year. And if it really takes that long to clear the infections, I don’t think I can expect to be free from PANS until they’re gone, either, can I?

So what can I do? I’m beyond tired of fighting for my life, because I’ve had PANS for ten years (untreated for eight of them), and I’ve especially been fighting hard over the last few months because of this Lyme-triggered relapse. Plus, trying to conquer an eating disorder brought on by all of this has taken its toll on me. But now, they’ve told me that I must also fight against Lyme somehow? How many battles can one person fight at once?

But one evening this week, when I was feeling particularly depressed about my situation, I came across a Bible verse that really spoke to my battle fatigue:

“The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still” (Exodus 14:14).

In reality, for now, “Fighting Lyme,” is nothing more than adding another antibiotic and a few more supplements and continuing to do my best to live a healthy life. To fight Lyme, I only have to be still and wait for these treatments to work. Fighting Lyme changes absolutely nothing about my day-to-day life—except that eventually, it will get better and easier when I beat it into submission.

Although it may seem like Lyme is a whole other terrifying monster to try to subdue, when I was done with my shock and denial, I realized that fighting Lyme isn’t actually much different from fighting PANS. “Being still” and waiting for treatments to work is exactly what I’ve been doing for PANS for the last two years, but now, I’ll be eliminating the infection that triggered this whole relapse in the first place. So really, the diagnosis is a good thing, because I have a more concrete plan for how to recover from both PANS and Lyme.

And so, readers, it looks like you’re going to get at least another year of posts out of me, thanks to this long Lyme treatment process. Two weeks in, I’ve already made leaps and bounds—I’m concentrating better and no longer have suicidal thoughts—so with any luck, 2017 will be the year that you and I all beat PANS and Lyme once and for all.

Thanks for all of your support, particularly through my 2016 relapse. Here’s to a better 2017!

The One Thing I Hate More Than Therapy

Some college kids stockpile liquors, I stockpile nutrition supplements!

Some college kids stockpile liquors, but I stockpile nutrition supplements!

At 93 pounds, I was so miserable and malnourished that I didn’t even know how ill I was. At the time, when I found myself sitting in an infusion chair receiving my third IVIG, I silently wondered to myself what I was doing there. How could I have PANDAS if I wasn’t “that sick”? Why was I getting such a heavy-handed treatment? But with my weight nearing the so-called “starvation” range, many of my organs weren’t working properly anymore. My psychiatrist warned that I’d be in the hospital soon.

Three weeks later, I now realize IVIG probably saved my life. Thanks to the IVIG and accompanying steroids, my food-related fears were 75% gone within the first few days after treatment, and they’ve continued to die down. Unfortunately, the damage to my body was already done. Even though I was having less mental torment related to food, I still had to repair my malnourished body and regain at least seventeen pounds. But how?

While there are standards and scientific studies on recovering from Anorexia Nervosa, there’s little in the literature on recovering from PANDAS-related anorexia, so my doctors, my family, and I have found ourselves in uncharted territory, trying to figure out how best to treat me. How much of the anorexia treatment protocol applies to someone who never had body-image issues? Should I be forbidden to know my weight while recovering? Should I, too, be prevented from exercise for six months, even though I never exercised compulsively?

At the moment, the consensus is that I not only have to do all of my usual immune-system treatments for PANS, but I have to follow many of the standard treatments for Anorexia Nervosa. For example, I see a nutritionist every week and send her lists of everything I eat. I have weekly weigh-ins without being told the number. I do therapy with the psychiatrist, who also oversees the medical aspects of recovery. And I’ll soon participate in an eating disorder support group. The hope is that if I have a PANS flare that compels me to restrict again, therapy will give me more tools to fight back while I wait for medical treatments to kick in. Plus, regardless of my mental state, my body is damaged, and I need the professional help of a nutritionist to be sure my eating is conducive to healing.

However, now that I’m feeling so much better both mentally and physically, all of this therapy seems excessive… Actually, to be honest, I hate all of my anorexia treatments, and I’ve been doing my best to convince my parents and my team that I don’t need so much help.

In many ways, this feels like a repeat of my sentiments towards my weekly Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy sessions for OCD when I was seventeen. I knew I needed to go to them, but I abhorred every minute because I felt so embarrassed discussing the obsessions I’d always kept to myself.  At home, I often got into heated arguments with my parents about why I shouldn’t have the next appointment, I kept saying I was “just fine,” and I threatened to stop attending when I turned eighteen. But I stuck with it because the one thing I hated more than therapy was how my illness had ruined my life.

Similarly, now, I despise every trip to the nutritionist, every measurement on the scale, every mention of target BMI’s, every entry in my food diary. I want to block out that whole torturous, food-obsessed chapter of my life and forget it ever happened, but therapy brings to light the havoc anorexia wreaked upon my body and my life.  I hate that my doctors apparently think I can’t even be trusted to feed myself.  I hate the regimented meal-planning that therapy brings.  I hate how much of my day I spend working on recovery.  I hate that I feel like I’m in puberty all over again, because my body is starting to look different and feel strange (and I’m waiting for my period to come, just like a preteen).

But you know what? As much as I hate being treated for anorexia, I hate how life was at 93 pounds even more—I was so tormented and hemmed in by my obsessions and compulsions about food that I couldn’t see I was no longer living. If doing therapy on top of my medical treatments for PANS means giving me the best chance at never going back to that dark place, then so be it.

When I was discharged from weekly OCD therapy three years ago, I was indescribably grateful for the support my family and therapists had given me towards regaining my life. I discovered a freedom that I never dreamed was possible, because my family had pushed me to go to therapy. In the same way, as much as I don’t like to admit it now, I think I’ll look back someday and be grateful that my parents and doctors made me get treated for anorexia.

IVIG #3: Third Time’s a Charm

Could IVIG #3 be the end of PANS for me?

Could IVIG #3 be the end of PANS for me?

Today, just two weeks after my third IVIG, I’m happy to say I’ve made tremendous progress. I’m no longer afraid of food and calories, so I’ve probably gained back about half of the weight I lost. I’ve gotten strong enough to run (slowly). My POTS symptoms are basically gone, and my parents have told me that there’s life in my eyes again. Oh, and I’ve even finished all of the summer coursework for the classes I had to take incompletes in—including a twelve-page research paper!

So am I better now? Is life perfectly peachy now that I’ve had IVIG?

Not even close.

As I’ve said in the past, IVIG is really only the beginning of recovery—not the end. I spent much of the summer trying to hold myself together long enough to make it to IVIG, but now that it’s over and I continue to struggle, I’m realizing I still have to keep holding myself together. It’s not like you get IVIG and then you’re better. No, it can be up to a year before IVIG has its full effect.

I’m no stranger to this long healing process, though—this is my third time going through it. But of course, I don’t like to think about how long it can take to get better and what it entails. I’m not going to lie to those of you out there doing this for the first time… It’s hard—but so worth it in the end.

Some days and weeks, you might do extremely well and maybe even forget PANDAS is part of your life. Others, you might be worse than you were before IVIG. But a lot of the time, you won’t be sure if IVIG has done much good at all. Yet the truth is, if it’s working (and it does fail 10-15% of the time), it’s probably working so slowly that you can’t even tell. Blogging and keeping track of symptoms has helped me in the past, because it’s given me reference points for comparison that showed me I was getting better, even if I didn’t feel like it.

Every IVIG is different, however, because it’s always a unique set of people’s antibodies, and you never know how your body will respond to them. (This is one reason it sometimes fails.)  You and I will have unique experiences with our different IVIGs.

Each time I’ve had this treatment, it’s taken a different amount of time to work. The first time, it was two months, and then it stopped working another two months later. The second time, I improved some right away, but it was nine months and a tonsillectomy later when I felt like my symptoms no longer interfered with my life. This time, I’ve also improved right away, but now I have to wait to see what happens next.

I know this might be a long and difficult journey, but I’m not afraid of it, and I’m optimistic that I’m going to beat PANS for good this time around. I’ve already made huge progress. Plus, my doctor says she’s finding IVIG to be more effective when you don’t have tonsils/adenoids like I don’t.

I can’t know what the future holds, but I’m choosing to believe that, when it comes to me and IVIG, the third time’s a charm.

A Ghost in My Own Life

Ghost

With this latest relapse, I’ve been living as a ghost in my own life.

In a single day, I went from eagerly and excitedly whittling away at homework for my summer classes, to crying at the thought of writing a single paragraph of a paper. I went from enjoying meals and coffees with my friends, to being terrified of any group of people and not eating lunch at all. I went from being praised at school for contributions I made in my department, to wanting absolutely nothing to do with my chosen field.

And over a couple months, I went from a healthy 110 pounds to a dangerous 96 pounds because of my eating disorder.

To put one more rotten cherry on top of the melting sundae that was my sad state, I’ve been too sick to run. Running used to be the one thing that could make me feel better no matter how depressed I was, but now, I haven’t even had that.

Because of all this, this week, my family and I once again found ourselves in the waiting room of my PANDAS neurologist. I’d hoped that my one-year follow-up would be a happy visit when we would celebrate everything I accomplished this year, but now, we were almost as desperate as our first appointment two years ago. And I was even four pounds lighter than I was in 2014.

I knew my doctor would be concerned about my fourteen-pound weight loss, but I wasn’t prepared for her reaction to other symptoms. After I shared details about the last couple months, she looked at me and said, “I’m going to have a heart attack because you haven’t seen a cardiologist,” and immediately called the cardiology department at my local hospital to get an appointment.

Why such concern? My neurologist suspects that the flu-like illness I had three months ago was the Strep-triggered Rheumatic Fever, which often damages the heart. Indeed, I was diagnosed with post-viral pericarditis in May—an inflammation of the sack around my heart, so her suspicions are somewhat warranted. Although a recent EKG came back normal, I have yet to regain my strength. Furthermore, Rheumatic Fever can cause extreme fatigue and weight loss, which I’m experiencing.

“What about the anorexia?” my dad asked.
“She’s going to need more treatment. Some kids need three IVIG’s… Actually, this is bad enough for plasmapheresis,” my doctor told us.

I could’ve cried when I heard this. I didn’t realize how serious my eating disorder had become and that being malnourished could also possibly damage my heart. I knew I was miserable, but I didn’t know I was in bad enough shape to warrant IVIG or plasmapheresis. In that moment, I felt like surely none of this was happening to me—perhaps it was all just a nightmare. Perhaps I was only a ghost observing someone else’s life. But I was wide awake and in my own body.

So I have my third IVIG scheduled in a few weeks, and I’ll be seeing a cardiologist today (Tuesday). My doctor thinks it’s unlikely that my heart has been permanently damaged, but the possibility of Rheumatic Heart Disease is nothing to mess around with. Maybe I will at least have an answer as to why I’ve been so dizzy and exhausted and unable to run…

There is another ray of hope, too: I was switched from Azithromycin to penicillin, and so far, my mood seems to be brightening every day. I’ve even started eating an appropriate amount of food (though I still obsess and count calories in an unhealthy way), I’ve resumed my hobbies, and I’ve been able to do some homework. If the improvements continue, I won’t be getting IVIG.

It’s been an unbelievably awful few weeks, but I’m so determined to beat PANS into total submission one more time. I’m holding out hope that the penicillin will continue to work its mysterious healing and that I won’t ever need more IVIG. I’m choosing to believe that slowly, but surely, I will keep coming back to life in the flesh, never again to haunt myself like a ghost.

Why Antibiotics Are Necessary for PANS

Sometimes, you have to try a few antibiotics for PANS before you find the right one.

Sometimes, you have to try a few antibiotics for PANS before you find the right one.

Since being diagnosed with PANS, I’ve been on antibiotics for twenty months straight, save for one two-week break. I’ll continue until six months after my last symptom, or at the very least, through my senior year of college.

Over these months, I’ve tried a variety of antibiotics, including Augmentin XR and Cefdinir, but it was switching to Azithromycin in October that I believe was the final blow to my illness. The few mild symptoms that remain have little effect on my life.

Yet some critics might say that my taking antibiotics for twenty months is reckless—that I’m contributing to antibiotic resistance and an inevitable super-bug apocalypse. But these are the same doctors who will give a six-year-old anti-psychotics without investigating infectious triggers. So who’s the reckless one: the doctor who loads up a kindergartener on Abilify without running diagnostic tests, or the doctor who’s prescribing a year of Azithromycin, knowing it will keep me sane and healthy? Is it reckless to properly treat the underlying cause of a debilitating and potentially life-threatening illness?

Nevertheless, some skeptics argue that antibiotics merely have a placebo effect—that people are seeing a relationship between symptoms and antibiotics that doesn’t exist. But anyone who has PANDAS or who’s lived with a PANDAS child for any length of time may have observed the pattern of improvement with antibiotics over and over again—and knows it would be unscientific to claim these observations as mere coincidence.

But what about antibiotic resistance? What about the fact that antibiotics kill off beneficial gut bacteria? What about yeast infections? If PANDAS is just “sudden-onset pediatric OCD,” why not give kids an SSRI and send them to therapy? Why not treat the tics with some anti-psychotics? Surely long-term antibiotics are unhealthy, right?

If PANS could be effectively treated with therapy and anti-psychotics and SSRI’s alone, the PANS community would settle down and crowd into the offices of mainstream doctors, the kids would get better, and the families would go on thriving. But this isn’t the case. Treating infections is the most crucial part of recovering from PANS, because the infections are what trigger the symptoms in the first place. Any ongoing infections will continually provoke the immune system to create the antibodies that attack the brain and lead to symptoms. Thus, the infections need to be dealt with for healing to occur, and they need to be prevented for it to continue.

As for antibiotic resistance, more than half the antibiotics used in America are for agriculture. We should be worried about all the livestock being given antibiotics for non-therapeutic purposes—not kids with PANDAS who take amoxicillan to stop bad antibodies from attacking their brains. Some people with PANDAS are literally dying. I would argue that they need antibiotics as much as someone with life-threatening bacterial pneumonia, for which no one ever questions the use of antibiotics.

But surely after twenty months of antibiotics, my gut flora is a wreck, isn’t it? Seeing as I’ve never had a yeast infection or diarrhea or nausea during this whole time, I’d say I’m just fine. In fact, I had stomach issues before I started antibiotics that have since resolved. I’m not alone in this—I’ve heard similar reports from many other families. (All this being said, yes, I do take a probiotic everyday—with 30 billion live cultures.)

Antibiotics are a critical part in the healing process of PANS. For some, they may be the only treatment needed. For others, they’re one of many therapies that work together.

If you’re just starting on the road of antibiotic treatment, my best advice would be to realize that it can take time for PANDAS symptoms to die down. In some cases, you get worse before you get better.

Antibiotics are still drugs with risks, and using them shouldn’t be taken lightly. However, with PANDAS, the bigger risk is often to leave the trigger of the disease untreated.

Treatment Is a Kitchen Sink?

Treating PANS can mean trying the whole kitchen sink.

Treating PANS can mean trying the whole kitchen sink.

When I was first diagnosed with PANDAS in 2014, my doctor said the treatment plan was to give me “the whole kitchen sink.” In other words, I would receive the full range of therapies, many of them all at once. It was unscientific, since this made it hard to tell which treatments turned out to be the most effective, but for a girl who could hardly walk and had lost over 10% of her body weight, this approach was necessary.

Today, I can say with confidence that the kitchen sink worked for me, because I’m back in school and thriving, with only mild difficulties.

So many of you have asked me what exactly I did that got me better—the majority of the emails I receive from readers are questions about my treatments. Because of this, I’ve decided to do a series of posts on the various treatments I’ve used, what they were like, and how I responded (or not). I probably won’t do all the posts consecutively—if something else inspires me on a given week, I’ll interrupt the series.

You see, the problem with treating PANS is that the lack of diagnostic tests makes it impossible to know which treatment will provide the most relief. What worked for me won’t work for someone else. What worked for others didn’t always work for me.

Even worse, nearly all of the treatments available take weeks, if not months, to produce results, so by the time you know something didn’t work, you have to start all over again and hope the next thing you try will do the job. Meanwhile, you’re miserable and hardly yourself because of your plethora of debilitating symptoms. I can’t even begin to express how agonizing the process can be when you’re not making progress, and you’re wondering how much longer until your treatments help you get better—or if you’ll ever get better at all.

Moreover, because of the lack of awareness and the lack of doctors with PANDAS experience, there’s no one to hold your hand through the recovery journey. The PANDAS specialists are overrun with cases and can’t speak to you often enough, and you’re fortunate if you can find a local doctor to simply refill your antibiotics—let alone to provide treatment guidance.

The fact that dozens of parents ask advice from a twenty-year-old with no formal medical training who writes a blog from her dorm room—this tells you everything you need to know about how hungry people are for information, hope, and support when dealing with PANS. On the other hand, there are many things one can learn from a patient that can never be gleaned from cold facts presented in medical journals.

All of this is to say that I’m going to be doing this series to hopefully make the treatment journey less scary for those in the middle of it. I’m not here to suggest any particular methods for others, but I hope by going into more detail about what I did, people might better understand what to expect after having made their own decisions with their doctors.

When my doctor first told me about the “kitchen sink,” I never could’ve imagined how many kinds of treatments I would try before getting completely better.  Recovering from PANS is the hardest thing I’ve ever done, but all that matters is that something worked for me—or more likely, several things worked together.

So readers, I hope you’ll come gather round my kitchen sink in these next few posts, and we’ll talk about this treatment and recovery journey that we’re all on together.

New Year News

2016: The year I'm finally well?

2016: The year I’m finally well?

I haven’t had time to write a longer post for a few weeks, but I just wanted to assure you that I haven’t disappeared.

I’ve been away, not because I’m ill, but because I’m well. In fact, I’d say I’m the best I’ve been in the last nine years.

Contrary to what you might expect, the more often I post or tweet, the worse I’m doing. When I’m well, I get out of the house and keep very busy. When I’m ill, PANDAS takes over my life, and I can’t do much. The only thing I can do when I’m sick is write about being sick and talk to other people dealing with this disease.

I’m not sure what happened recently, but I believe I’m finally well.

Yes, that’s right.  I really did just say that: I’m well.

So what did it?  I don’t think there was any one magical treatment or supplement or diet.  It was a combination of everything I’ve done up to this point—and everything I’m still doing.

My first IVIG got me 50% back.  The second got me to 70%.  The tonsillectomy brough me to 95%, and when I switched to Azithromycin, I finally came back to myself all the way.  Prednisone and Wellbutrin made my life almost liveable while I was still less than a shadow of my former self.  Switching to paleo eating meant getting out of my body’s way while it worked with the other treatments to heal.  (I’ll elaborate on these things in a future post…)

At the moment, I don’t even think of myself as a person with PANDAS anymore—I’m a person who beat it. Sure, I still have very small involuntary movements and some tics sometimes.  And I still take medications and supplements, but I don’t feel like PANDAS has any significant effect on my quality of life.

Whether this present health and remission is permanent, remains to be seen.  I could flare again when I’m exposed to Strep.  Who knows?

I’ll be heading back to college soon, and I’ll finally be taking a full load—including one of the most difficult classes in my major.  But to me, being able to work hard is a privilege.

So, readers, that’s all I have for now.  I just wanted to share with you that I’m doing very well for a change—and I wish the same for you.

But don’t worry… I promise this blog isn’t going anywhere—I actually have quite a few posts that are almost ready (but I haven’t had time to finish them). I’ll write more when I can.

I wish all of you a Happy New Year full of health and healing!

Can Hamburgers Stop Flares?

Even in a flare, this silly hamburger label made me laugh!

Even in a flare, this silly hamburger label made me laugh!

I’ll be the first one to admit that there’s pretty much nothing good about having flares or having to take all of the antibiotics and other medications that I take. But, sometimes, in the craziness of it all, I just have to laugh at my circumstances—especially when there’s a hamburger on my bottle of Cefdinir, which I only acquired because of a flare…

After five days of an increased Prednisone dose the other week, I was starting to come out of the mud of depression and brain fog. I almost thought I was okay. My psychiatrist had me double my Wellbutrin to help what was left of the depression, and I was almost hoping that would be enough.

But then the PANDA bear grabbed me again.

When my tics start up, I feel like someone is taking control of my body. I feel like there’s some outside force enveloping me, forcing me to do the movements or make the noises. Sometimes, I can almost feel it on my skin, and that’s rather frightening.

It had been months since I’d had that sensation and since I’d ticked like I did one night this week. Clearly, I’d been exposed to something that my body was reacting to.

A couple of my doctors were highly suspicious that I’d caught Mycoplasma (walking Pneumonia), since it doesn’t respond to the Augmentin I take daily, so I got an Azithromycin Z-pack to treat it. I’d been holding off on starting it for a bit, hoping I could do without it, but when the tics came back and I wasn’t focusing again, I knew I had to do something.

I’m one of those kids who’s usually been classified as a “non-responder” to antibiotics, but given how bad my tics were and the lingering depression and anxiety, I figured it was worth a shot. Plus, I’d been having this weird shortness of breath and a cough, so it wasn’t totally crazy to suspect pneumonia.

To my astonishment, the day after my first dose of Azithromycin, something strange happened: I realized that I wasn’t ticking at all! By the second day, the cloud of despair that I get during flares was also gone. And I was even being productive!

Now that I’ve finished the Z-Pack, I’m doing umbelieveably well taking the hamburger Cefdinir instead of Augmentin XR, and Cefdinir kills Serratia marcescens. (For those of you who are new to my blog, that bacteria once infected my tonsils and probably caused a number of flares.) But since I’d been so depressed for several weeks recently, I hadn’t been cleaning my shower, and of course, there was a huge colony of Serratia growing in one of the corners. Yuck! I’m sure that didn’t help…

I'm 99% sure this was Serratia in my shower...

I’m 99% sure this pink blob in my shower was Serratia

But now, I’ve had someone else clean out the shower with Lysol (to limit my exposure), and I’ve been taking Cefdinir, and I’m doing wonderfully. In fact, I’ve had a few days of feeling 100% and completely symptom-free this week. I don’t know if it was the Azithromycin or the Cefdinir or the Serratia-free shower or all of the above, but no matter what it is, I’m glad for the relief.

Yet I never know how many good days I’m going to have before I flare, so I’m trying to savor and make the most of these good days while I can. I have a bad feeling I’m going to flare again, but I’d like to think it’s just an unfounded fear… Whatever the case, I’ll just keep living as much as I can in the middle of fighting off this crazy disease.

PANDAS is so difficult to go through, but I’ll just keep trying to laugh about the little things—like that silly hamburger—to make the journey more tolerable as I work to find the best treatments.

Until the Victory Is Mine

I was hoping to never again need my 10 mg Prednisone tablets...

I was hoping to never again need my 10 mg Prednisone tablets…

One of the hardest things about PANDAS is that you never know what it’s going to do next. Just as you’ve finally gotten your life back, it can strike again. Or just as you’re sure the fight is hopeless, things might turn a corner. Sometimes, it seems like there’s no rhyme or reason to its course.

Indeed, it wasn’t too long ago that my doctor said I was in remission. My family and I were stunned at the improvements I was making after my tonsillectomy. But this week, the unthinkable has happened: I am, once again, having a flare.

Over the last month, I’ve been going through more and more days with significant symptoms. I tried to attribute them to the stress of college or to psychological trauma from living with a horrible illness for so long. I didn’t even consider the possibility that my illness was coming back. But this week, I finally fell off the cliff again, and it was impossible to deny.

Not too long ago, I was feeling on top of the world, loving every moment of college. But one day, I woke up with a sore throat and despair, and nothing has been right since.

My depression has been so bad that I cannot make myself get off the floor of my room to even get a cup of water. I cannot do any homework, because as soon as I try (when I can make myself try at all), I burst into tears for no reason. I cannot concentrate on anything I would normally want to work on, either, which makes me feel like a total failure in life. I’ve been experiencing that all-too-familiar feeling of being detached from the world around me, as if I’m separated by an invisible wall. Most telling of all, my legs have begun to seize up on me when I walk, and I’ve lost the fine-motor skills that let me type accurately. And, of course, I’m being tormented with new obsessions and compulsions.

I’m devastated. I was hoping that I could just be done with this blasted disease and get on with my life. Is being able to use my brain too much to ask for? I want nothing more than to live a quiet, productive life and to contribute positive things to society.  And yes, it would be really nice if I could actually be happy. But instead, here I am, crippled by the despair and terror that this disease creates in my brain.

However, as awful and disappointing as it is to be having such debilitating symptoms again, people have pointed out that flaring doesn’t mean I’m heading for a full-blown relapse. It’s just as likely that I’m still healing, and this is only a bump in the road. If I’ve learned anything from my long recovery journey, it’s that healing a brain and an immune system is never a linear process. Sometimes, you make giant leaps forward. Other times, you stumble down a few stairs. But the most important thing is to keep getting back up and fighting with everything you have.

I’ve been on a 5-day burst of a higher dose of Prednisone, and it’s helped tremendously so far. While I’m glad for the relief, it’s been difficult to realize that many of my symptoms can be attributed to inflammation—which means I still have bad antibodies affecting my brain. It’s hard to know that I’m still fighting that familiar foe.

Honestly, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t worried about what the future holds or wondering if I’ll ever really get 100% better. I’m so sick of battling this disease, but if I’ve made it this far, I can’t possibly give up now.

So here’s to staying in this war a little while longer, until the victory is mine.

Quietly Out of Control

You can binge eat on a paleo diet? Heaven help me…

When most people who’ve dealt with PANDAS or PANS think about being out of control, what probably comes to mind are episodes of rage, debilitating OCD, constant tics, and panic attacks. While these things are the most characteristic of the disorder, during the last few weeks, I’ve been finding that sometimes, you can be out-of-control and look totally fine on the outside.

Right now, it feels as though all of my thoughts are swarming around me, and I try to catch them, but they manage to slip out of my hands before I can put them back into the cage of my head. Just as I’ve grabbed one thought, as soon as I try to reach for another, the first one slips out. I forget things quickly. I don’t pay attention. I get nothing done. I end up feeling frantic and restless, yet I can’t actually do anything productive with all of this unfocused energy.

But what makes me feel the most out-of-control is that there’s a puppeteer in my head that makes me do things I don’t really want to do. It makes me read pointless articles on the Internet when I want to be reading my textbooks. It makes me sit on the floor and stare at nothing instead of getting into bed when I’m ready to sleep. It makes me bike all the way across town to areas I don’t know when I only need to bike to the college library. And it’s impossible to extricate myself from the puppeteer’s control.

Lately, it has me doing something even more disturbing: binge eating.

I think about food a lot, and often, I start eating when I’m not even hungry. And then I can’t stop. I just stand in the kitchen eating and eating, knowing exactly what’s going on, but feeling powerless to do anything else. When I’m finally done, I feel bad about it, and I’m tormented with the idea that I’m going to get fat. I think about fasting to make up for it (but I never actually do it). I think about how long I will have to work out to burn it off. I “check myself” in the mirror every time I walk by, which I know is ridiculous, but it sometimes makes me feel better for a moment.

So far, I’m still below the weight I was before I had an intense period of restricted eating in the summer of 2014. I tell myself that as long as I keep running and working out, it will be fine. But I know I’m not fine…

I’m not heading in a good direction.  I’m beyond frustrated with my out-of-control mind, and I’m frightened by my out-of-control actions.

In desperation during midterms the other week, I restarted taking Provigil (with my doctor’s approval) to maybe have something that remotely resembled an ability to focus and get some work done. For a week, it worked beautifully, but now, I’m feeling unfocused and out-of-control all over again. Even worse, my depression has come back despite temporarily stopping my Prednisone taper—which my doctor suspected was causing it a couple weeks ago.

I’m beginning to question everything all over again… Am I really in remission? Am I getting worse? Am I feeling this way because my classmate just had Strep? Could this be related to the Prednisone taper? Is any of it part of the PTSD?

For now, I have no answers. I’m going back to the psychiatrist this week, though, so maybe he can help get me through this rough patch…

I’m better than I was last semester or a year ago. I do have good days where I have concentration and control. I’ve even had quite a few days where I’m not depressed, either. But one thing is certain: I’m still fighting PANS. And whatever it takes, I have to find a way to put my thoughts back into my head and free myself from the puppeteer.

The Day I Outran My Illness

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There are some moments in life that you can never forget—moments when your whole world is turned upside, for better or worse. Living with PANS, a disease that sets in overnight and flares up in the same way, I’ve had more than my fair share of those life-changing moments.

However, another such moment (albeit a more positive one) happened on Saturday when I finished my first half-marathon: 13.1 slow, arduous miles.

That morning, as I squeezed my way through the crowd of 20,000 people and into my assigned corral at the start line, it was hard to believe that the time had finally come—the time to show that, in spite of my illness, I had earned my way into the throngs of runners who had also trained for this race relentlessly for months upon months.

I’ll never forget the feeling at the ten-second countdown as I stood at the front of my corral, staring down what seemed to be an endless stretch of asphalt. I’ll never forget the sinking realization that I had to depend only on my own body—one whose immune system once betrayed me in the worst way—to carry me through 13.1 miles of road.

Usually, before racing a half-marathon, one would’ve probably tried to run thirteen or more miles in training. I only got up to twelve because of an injury. Before the race, I hadn’t run more than eight miles at a time in over two months, so I felt extremely unprepared to run 13.1…

But the problem is that, once you’re there at the starting line, there’s no turning back. It’s a done deal. You have to at least try.

And the gun went off.

For the first two miles, I held my own at an easy pace. But although I was running steadily with a pace team, suddenly, it didn’t feel so easy anymore. I began to wheeze. My throat tightened up. I started to black out.

I watched helplessly as everyone left me crawling behind. There goes my two-hour goal, I thought to myself (before it occurred to me that I should probably find a medic or at least walk for a bit).

Only once in my life have I ever had an asthma attack, and it happened years ago—never during all of my difficult training runs for this race. To have something so unexpected happen precisely when I needed it not to happen was infuriating.

Being the stubborn and persistent person that I was, though, I kept running (well, more like waddling) for another mile, hoping it would pass. And of course it didn’t.

“I’m done. I can’t do this anymore!” I sobbed out-loud at mile three. “There’s no way I can possibly run ten more miles like this. Look at me! I can’t even breathe.”

But then, I began to think about how difficult the last nine years of my life have been. I thought about all the days I’d been sure I couldn’t possibly go on—yet I’d made it this far.  I thought about all the other kids out there with PANS and PANDAS and how I wanted to show that our disease doesn’t get to win.

I couldn’t quit. With tears streaming down my face and onto the road, I slowed down, hydrated, caught my breath, then kept going for ten miles more.

The race began to get smoother after that, but it was never easy.

I wanted to stop when I hit a large hill at mile six and was already exhausted before beginning the climb.

I wanted to quit when I had a second asthma attack at mile nine.

I wanted to give up when my legs burned with lactic acid at mile eleven.

I wanted to go home when I reached mile twelve and my entire back was screaming at me for being subjected to the impact for so many miles.

Nevertheless, after two hours and thirty-two minutes, I crossed the finish line—and won.  I may have run slowly, and I may have missed my time goal by more than half-an-hour, but that day, I outran PANS.

I won because I didn’t let my illness stop me.

I won because I overcame the paralysis attacks that plagued me last summer—and became a runner.

I won because I didn’t give up.

I won because I crossed a finish line that no one believed I’d cross.

My finish time no longer mattered—I won my own race.

I am still shocked that I pulled off a half-marathon, but I also know that I didn’t do it on my own. I surely never would’ve done it without the doctors and the treatments I’ve received. I wouldn’t have finished without the thousands of people who donated the plasma used in my IVIG infusions. I wouldn’t have finished without the physical therapists who fixed my knee when I injured it in training. I wouldn’t have finished without my family, friends, supporters, blog readers, and the thousands of people cheering on all the runners that morning.

So to all of you out there… Thank you!

What’s It Like to Survive a Flare?

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This week, I finally hit the post-IVIG flare that we were all dreading.  Thanks to a six-day burst of high-dose Prednisone, I’ve come out of it now, but I hope I don’t have to go through that ever again.  Unfortunately, I probably will.

Until my most recent IVIG, my flares were getting worse and worse.  One night a few weeks ago, I found myself spacing out at the kitchen table for about two hours, unable to make myself get up, because I had too many OCD compulsions. When I realized I’d been doing nothing for two hours and thought about how hard it would be to do anything with the burden of OCD, I just lost it—I spent twenty minutes walking around my apartment screaming and hitting the walls.

On another night, I similarly started screaming, but then ran outside and sprinted for half a mile in the rain at 1:30 in the morning. Shapes were rising out of the bushes during the run—shadows were everywhere… I realized I was hallucinating.

This week’s flare wasn’t nearly as bad—my latest IVIG seems to be damping things down.  This time around, my flare consisted of depression, feeling detached from everything and being “out-of-it,” some of the worst tics and choreiform movements since the summer, bad memory problems, and crying about everything for no reason.  The flare wasn’t pleasant, but at least I wasn’t hallucinating.

At this point, I’ve become a master of knowing when I’m about to flare. It’s true that all my flares happen very suddenly, but there are a few warning signs…

The first clue for me is that I start to have a hard time making myself do anything in the hours leading up to the flare. I lose interest in things. If I’ve made plans, I cancel them if at all possible. It’s almost like my body knows it needs to conserve energy to brace for the coming battle—before I consciously know it’s coming.

The second clue is that my physical pain suddenly gets worse. As a result of another condition called Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, I’m almost always in some amount of pain, but this is different. I start to get this strange, dull ache all across the backs of my arms and sometimes in my legs, too.  Before this week’s flare, I went to bed and had that pain in my arms and thought a flare would be coming. The next morning, I had no other signs of flaring, but sure enough, that afternoon, I fell off the cliff.

Another sign of a coming flare is that my cognitive issues suddenly get worse—especially the word-finding problems.  I don’t know the names of everyday objects.  I try to articulate myself, but I say things in the wrong order and get the tenses of my verbs wrong. Sometimes I know how I want to say something, but it doesn’t come out of my mouth that way.  I find that increased word-finding difficulties might happen only a few minutes before the worst of the flare.

But what’s it like to experience a flare?  The tics and other movements are obvious. You can see the “look of terror” I get with my widened eyes. You can watch me having a panic attack. You can hear me yelling at my parents. You can notice me doing more compulsions than usual. If you could read my mind, you’d know that the looping, intrusive thoughts start happening much more often. But it’s more than all of that—flaring feels like losing yourself.  It’s like something outside of yourself takes control and snatches who you are away.

When I flare, it feels like someone is taking things out of my mind and hiding them—and refusing to tell me how to get anything back.  I look for the words to speak, but this monster has set them up in a high place I cannot reach. I try to remember what happened the week before, who that familiar face is that I’ve seen hundreds of times, or even what I was in the middle of doing, but it has all been stolen out of my mind, and I don’t know where the monster has put any of it—I just know it’s all gone.

When I flare, it feels like I’m living in another world, unable to traverse the chasm that is my mind in order to be with everyone else.  I know I can’t think clearly about anything, but I cannot specifically tell you what about me is “off.”  I may try to go about my day as usual, but the world doesn’t quite make sense, and I feel like I’m somewhere else. The scary thing is that I never know how far away I’ve been until I come back out of the flare—and then it’s like I have been away for a long time am rediscovering all the wonderful things about the world and the people around me.

Coming out of a flare is like getting the proper prescription at the eye doctor—you didn’t know what you had been missing until you saw clearly again. You knew things weren’t quite in focus, but you never could’ve imagined all the details you once missed—but now, everything seems even more beautiful since you can fully see it.

I often wonder how many more times I’ll have to go through these flares. I’m not myself at all when I flare, so I feel as though I’m living between the flares, hoping to have as full of a life as possible.  I go to college like everyone else. I have friends. I even make straight-A’s.  But I live with the constant reality that I could flare at any moment.

I try to live the life I want to live between the flares because when you never know when you’ll lose yourself next, you have to make the most of every moment and cherish each day that you get. I lose my perspective on everything when I flare, but if I can look at all I accomplish in the better times, I can maybe know on some level that I am still me—no matter how much each flare makes me feel otherwise.

IVIG #2: I’m Finally Aware

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I just finished my second, and hopefully last, IVIG treatment!

Recently, I’d been feeling like I’d made no progress with any of my symptoms after my first IVIG.  But strangely, it was the process of going back for another IVIG that showed me this was simply untrue.

When I had the first IVIG in August, if I got out of the chair to stand up and stretch my legs, I started doing a wild choreiform movement dance. I couldn’t even look at my doctor to talk to her because I was moving so much. I had to hold onto the IV bag pole to keep from falling down when I tried to walk down the hall to the bathroom.

This time, I hardly had any movements, and the ones I did have were barely noticeable to anyone besides me—except for when I took one spill in the hallway…

While my movement disorders have improved significantly, I’d say the main difference between last week and my August IVIG has been that, before my first IVIG, I don’t think I fully understood how serious this disease could be.

In August, I didn’t realize that, if it weren’t for the Prednisone burst that had brought me back a few weeks beforehand, I could’ve starved myself. It didn’t occur to me that if we hadn’t figured out I had PANS, I would’ve been locked up in a psych ward with constant monitoring so I wouldn’t hurt myself. I didn’t grasp that I needed IVIG to avoid a lifetime of mental illness, disability, and unimaginable suffering.

But now I get it.  Sometimes, it’s too much to process.  I simply cannot bear to think about what would’ve happened to me without treatment.  I nearly lost everything…

During the IVIG treatment this week, I was also well enough to understand how bad things still are—although it’s a good sign that I’m able to recognize this. I know that my general and social anxiety and OCD have been incapacitating, all of my executive functioning abilities are very poor, and everyday tasks are sometimes impossible.

But even if some of these symptoms aren’t much better than they were in August, my perception is much improved. It’s like someone has finally given me a pair of glasses for my mind, and I can finally see what I’ve been missing for so long. While it’s painful to know there’s so much I couldn’t see, it’s comforting to know I’m coming back in some ways.

Unfortunately, being more aware means I’m also able to worry more.  I worry because, if this IVIG doesn’t bring me back to 100%, I’ll be spending a month of my summer in isolation following a five-day plasmapheresis treatment in the hospital. If that fails, I’ll be going through Rituximab infusions—a form of chemotherapy.

I had big plans to take summer classes and get a job, but how can I plan anything when I have no idea whether I’ll be able to leave my house or not this summer? All I want is to not suffer so much—especially since I’m so conscious of my suffering now. I just want to be allowed to be myself.

Sometimes, I cannot sleep at night because I’m afraid I’ll never get back to who I am. Or even worse, I worry that I won’t know that I’m not completely better, and then I won’t get the treatment I need, and then I’ll slip into a relapse just as I’ve finally returned to a good life—and then I’ll go through this whole thing all over again.

But I don’t want to worry—I want to enjoy the improvements I’ve already seen after this second IVIG: my OCD almost completely disappeared overnight, my memory is much better, I’ve been able to contribute to discussions in my classes this week, and I’m even enjoying things again. This is wonderful, almost miraculous, news. Oh, that this trend would continue…

Falling Off

This bulletin board represents my life

Even though I love to decorate my room, when I moved into my apartment in August, I could only muster the willpower to put just a handful of small pictures on my bulletin board. During my Freshman year, I’d made my room look like “an Athenian palace,” as one friend put it—at least when I didn’t leave my trash strewn all over the floor (thanks, hoarding OCD).

My lack of decor last semester was an analog of my life. When I finally turned a corner in November, I covered most of my bulletin board with posters, postcards, pictures, and swag from my first 5k race. The better I’m doing, the more things are on the bulletin board.

A few weeks ago, pictures and papers started falling off, one-by-one. I didn’t put them back.

On some level, I knew I wasn’t feeling completely like myself, although I kept trying to pretend I was okay. But more pictures kept falling…

I began to struggle through each day more and more, feeling increasingly detached from everything around me while the ever-emptier bulletin board subconsciously reminded me I wasn’t myself. Then one night, I finally fell off a cliff.

I realized I’d come down with a virus. The virus itself was hardly noticeable, but the PANS symptoms that it caused to flare were debilitating. That night, I lost it. I was agitated for no reason. I kicked at the wall and made more papers fall off the board by accident.

While lying in bed, I thought to myself, I should go run around outside. I had no purpose or destination. I just felt strongly that I needed to do it—never mind that I was in my pajamas and it was extremely cold. But then the rational part of my mind kicked back in a little, I guess I should grab my keys. It never occurred to me how little sense it made and that if I was running around outside in my pajamas at 1:00 in the morning, campus police would probably think I was intoxicated—or take me to the psych ward.

The fatigue from the virus kept me in bed, but then the intrusive thoughts started up again and were very disturbing. I was severely depressed. Sometimes I actually believed the thoughts. Sometimes I wondered if I actually wanted them to be true. I didn’t know what thoughts were mine anymore. I didn’t realize how irrational I was thinking and behaving.

During one moment of insight, I finally reached for my phone and called my parents: “Mom, I need you to come right now. I’m losing it, and the thoughts are getting scarier and scarier.”

I ended up going back on a higher dose of Prednisone again. Amazingly, after a few days, it mostly brought me back to where I was when I was at my best in November.

This week, I’ve put everything back up on the bulletin board—and I even added some new things. I’m not depressed at all now, I’m ticking less, and I’ve had no trouble with remembering words. I feel connected to the world again.

I didn’t realize how far gone I was in that flare until I came out of it. I wasn’t too frightened at the time, but now I’m terrified that a cold made me lose my mind. What a horrible idea to live with!

I could worry about it happening again. I could back into a corner and scream, “Why me?” I could stay in my room and not come out so that I couldn’t catch another virus. Or I could just enjoy all the good days I’m having right now. I can keep living and doing the things I want to do.

I’ve decided to keep putting the pictures back even if they fall off sometimes. When they fall, they’re not gone forever—they’re only displaced. It’s hard to feel like you lose huge pieces of yourself sometimes, but I know they will always come back eventually…

Am I Better Yet?

Ever since I started treatment this summer, I’ve found myself constantly asking, “Am I better yet?”

When I got IVIG, I’d hoped maybe I would start getting better within a few weeks. Whenever I had a good day, I started to think I was getting better. But then the symptoms would come back, and I’d be disappointed. I’d been told it could take me up to a year to get back to 100%, but I hoped it would be sooner. Wouldn’t you?

Six months later, I’m still playing the am-I-better-yet game, and the answer is still no. Certainly, I’m “better” than I was in a lot of ways, but I’m nowhere near where I want to be. I was doing really well, but now that I’m finding out where I am with less of the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppresent qualities of the steroids, I really don’t like what I’m seeing.

At 10 mg, I went back to not being able to walk normally. I ticked a lot. I couldn’t remember simple words and often had to pantomime things to get my point across. I kept seeing everyday things that had a “bad” texture, and looking at them made me sick to my stomach. If I took Nuvigil to keep me awake, the symptoms I was left with were close to the level of impairment I lived with for the three or four good years I had since getting sick—better than I was this summer.

At 5 mg now, things aren’t looking so good. I’m having bouts of depression where I hate doing the things I usually love. I sometimes start shivering all over when I’m not cold—a symptom I hadn’t had since September. Some days, I’ve had as many as ten or twenty falls because I can’t walk normally now. As I’m riding my kick scooter across campus, my fingers involuntarily lift off the handle bars for a couple seconds (my thumb doesn’t, so I’m not going to fall off), and it looks like I’m giving passersby some weird sort of wave—but this is just a new choreiform movement.  Having this one new choreiform movement is better than that constant full-body dance I did a few months ago.

Worst of all, my cognitive symptoms are becoming more severe and obvious. Instead of forgetting words, now I just say the wrong word and don’t even realize it until after I’ve done it—if I realize it at all. I’ve had a lot of people ask me to repeat things I say lately, which makes me think I’m messing up my words even more often than I realize. Sometimes, I say something and watch people think about what I’ve said and then ask me, “Oh, do you mean…?”

Sometimes, it can be as simple as me calling a bagel a doughnut, but other times, it’s much more disruptive. Someone asked me for directions recently, and I meant to tell them to make a left turn, but I ended up saying “right turn.” I tried to set up a time to hang out with someone else and tell them Thursday didn’t work but Friday was good, and instead I said, “We should get together on Thursday.” I don’t speak up in class anymore because I’m sure I’ll say something stupid.

My concentration is possibly at its all-time worst. I was trying to pay attention to a lecture the other day, but instead, I completely checked out without realizing it. Ten minutes later, I came out of it and had absolutely no idea what was being discussed. I tried to get back into focus, but it was impossible, so I just sat there in another world for the rest of the class. And then during my choir’s rehearsal this week, I lost my place in the music every few measures and had to rely on the girl next to me to repeatedly show me where we were. I had to call my mom and have her read aloud an assigned reading and help me parse the meaning of the text. And while writing this post, I’ve been noticing an unusual amount of typos and grammar errors.

As bad as some of my symptoms are, I’m happy to say that I barely have OCD anymore—if I have it at all. I’m also having more days when I hardly tic. I haven’t had a full-blown panic attack since October. I’m running more and more and have even joined a local running club (you don’t really have to talk when you’re running). I was so ill and exhausted from being malnourished this summer that I could barely run a 12-minute mile, but now I can run eight miles non-stop at a 9:40/mile pace.

As I continue to ask myself if I’m better and over-analyze each symptom, I’m going to try to remember how much I have improved—and I’ll keep hoping that someday, I’ll ask myself, “Am I better yet?” and the answer will be an indisputable yes.

My 6-Mile Run… To the Pharmacy

Managing my medications is a big production. If I didn’t have a pill case, there’s no way I could possibly remember to take all eleven things each day.  Every week, I sit down and fill the case for the week. It takes half-an-hour. It used to take longer when my OCD was worse and I had to check and re-check everything a ridiculous number of times. I only check it once now.

Just a few of my daily meds

Just a few of my daily meds

As you can imagine, I am over at the pharmacy a lot between the Prednisone, Nuvigil, Augmentin XR, and all the over-the-counter medicines and supplements I take. You know it might be a little out-of-hand when you walk up to the counter and the pharmacist says, “Oh, it’s you again.” True story.

A few days ago, as I was lining up all the bottles and getting ready to put everything in my case, I got to the Augmentin XR and realized I only had a few days left. I needed to go back to the pharmacy… Again. The problem is, the pharmacy is a mile away from where I live. If I drove there, I would lose my good parking spot. Walking would take too long.

So I did the only logical thing: I decided to turn my trip to the pharmacy into the destination for my first ever 10 km run.

Do you realize the irony here? I was about to run six miles to go pick up the medicine I need to take because I’m sick. Hmm… How sick can I really be?

I put on my running gear, grabbed my pepper spray and medical ID, and headed out across town. When I had run one mile, I was hardly tired at all. By the second mile, I was barely sore. By the time I reached mile three, my joints were complaining a little bit, but I thought to myself, “I’ve only gone three miles. I feel great!”

Only three miles. Just a few months ago, I could hardly run one mile. The fact that I’m now thinking of three miles as a short run is incredible.

At mile five, I took a wrong turn, and I realized I was lost. But hey, I had 1.2 more miles to get to the 10 km goal, so I kept running. Unfortunately, when I finished, I ended up 1.5 miles away from the pharmacy. I felt like I could have kept running to get the rest of the way there, but I didn’t want to push it. Besides, I had done it—I ran 10 km (about 6.2 miles).

When I got sick in 2006, I had been training to work my way up to running a 10k race. And then PANS hit me like a train, and I had to stop running altogether before I got past running four miles. But I had done it now, albeit eight years later. Take that!

As happy as I was for this victory, I also realized that I was in quite a predicament. I didn’t know the area I had ended up in, it was getting dark and cold, and the pharmacy was 1.5 miles away. Should I wait at the bus stop? Should I call a friend to pick me up? Should I get a cab? I decided to walk and use the time to call my parents.

The amazing thing is that the worry that I physically wouldn’t be able to walk 1.5 miles because of my falls never even crossed my mind at the time. I just started walking, and the whole way there, I didn’t even have the slightest knee-dip or feeling of paralysis. I was just a normal, tired runner walking home (and stopping at the pharmacy on the way there).

On my good days, I often start to think, “Hey, maybe I’m better now!” But then I look at my pill case and realize that it takes 24 pills each day to feel the way I do—and I’m still not 100%.

Still, even if I’m walking around carrying the pills, at least I’m walking at all. For now, I can dream about the day when I’ve left all the bottles behind and don’t even realize it—just like I didn’t realize how amazing it was that I walked 1.5 miles…

IVIG: Four-Month Update!

It’s been over four months since I had IVIG—and six months since the abrupt onset of my tics and other movement problems. On the whole, I’d say I’m much better.  I’ve even started tapering off the steroids.  The way I put it with my family is that I finally feel like a person again.  I’m almost back to where I was before I started flaring two years ago—with the addition of tics, some walking issues, and hypersomnia.  It’s not all forward progress, though.  It’s really more of a two-steps-forward-one-step back process.

The movement problems have gotten slightly worse again, although they’re still nothing like the crazy chorea dance I was constantly doing this summer. The hypersomnia is by far the worst symptom now. I’m completely dysfunctional if I don’t take the wakefulness med Nuvigil. I fall asleep after sitting down anywhere for more than ten minutes. When I do happen to be “awake,” I’m loopy and can’t concentrate. At least I have Nuvigil… My doctor just started me on another anti-inflammatory called Plaquenil, so I’m hoping maybe it will help some of this.

When you’re sleep is messed up, everything is messed up.  I still have trouble with concentration and processing written information. The less steroids I take, the more I often I have trouble coming up with words for everyday objects, which only makes my social anxiety worse.  But I’m not depressed anymore. I still have quite a bit of general and social anxiety, but I was able to have a small party at my apartment at the end of the semester—even though the idea of having five friends over at once had me shaking all over earlier that day. A couple months ago, I know I wouldn’t have even considered inviting friends over.

Perhaps the most mind-blowing improvement is with my OCD. I’m slowly not carrying out compulsions anymore without having to go through months of CBT/ERP like I did in the past. There are times when I find myself touching something I wouldn’t have dared handle a couple months ago, and I only realize what I’ve done afterwards. I’m not sweating through anxiety when I don’t do my compulsions—I’m just not doing them without thinking about it. It’s amazing. As someone who has been through CBT before (and had success at the time), it’s very strange to see your brain rewiring itself without you having to consciously work so hard at it.

At my latest follow-up, my doctor told me I looked “less tormented.”  And that’s how it feels.   However, she was quite concerned about the sleep issues—especially that they had come back after being completely gone and that they didn’t go away on a Prednisone burst this time.

“At this point, we can talk about doing another IVIG,” She said. “But we need to wait at least six months to be sure you need it.”

I wasn’t surprised. But now I just have to keep waiting… again.

Nevertheless, on the whole, I’m doing so much better, and I’m very happy with the progress I’ve made. But do you want to know a secret? Getting better is frightening because the better I get, the more I realize how far gone I was this summer.  In June, I was hardly upset that I had stopped eating and couldn’t walk and suddenly had uncontrollable movements everywhere. I was apparently in a bit of a daze, and I had no idea how much I’d really lost my personality. Now that I’m back, I get it, and I’m even more grateful for my continuing recovery.

 

I’ve had this blog for over six months, and the responses and support I’ve received so far have been incredible. Thank you. I would love to get some feedback from all you amazing readers about what you want to read about next. I’m planning to continue posting regularly at least until I get 100% better and then for a few months afterwards.  That’s probably another year or two of writing.  (And then I want to turn it all into a book, but that’s another story…)

What topics would you most like to read about? Do you have any questions for me, as an eight-year survivor of OCD and PANS? Please comment with your ideas and thoughts!

What I Wish I’d Told My Parents

This time of the year is always difficult for me. Seven years ago at this time, I had the worst PANDAS flare of my life and descended into a terrifying world of OCD, odd behavior, insomnia, and depression. For a time, my symptoms completely tore apart my family.

I’ll never forget when I first made my parents cry. I was twelve years old, and we didn’t even know I had OCD, let alone PANS.  Had we known, things never would have gotten so bad.  My parents were almost as terrified as I was at the change they had seen in me.

I thought I was going crazy. I had to speak a certain way. I had to walk “just right.” I needed to be sure I chewed my food in a particular manner. And God-forbid if I breathed the wrong way… I also felt like I needed to jump out of the second-story window of my room. Why? I didn’t know. It just seemed like something I should do—it wasn’t because I was trying to hurt myself. I would impulsively taste things that shouldn’t be tasted—like shower gels and wet rocks I found in the woods. Again, I didn’t know why I did those things, but I just felt like I had to.

I refused to do my schoolwork. I looked at the words on the page of my textbooks, and they become horrible blasphemous thoughts in my mind. The thoughts never left me alone. Every moment of every day, no matter what I did, there they were to torment me. Everything I did was used against me to become something terribly immoral that showed I was a wicked child. To me, having the thoughts come was just as bad as saying them out-loud and meaning them—damning and perhaps unforgivable.

During school, I would sit and stare at the blank lines of my notebook paper, unable to explain that I was terrified of what the words I was supposed to write could become in my mind. My mom (who homeschooled me at the time), eventually would become exasperated, and I would run out of the room both because I couldn’t handle the OCD thoughts and because I couldn’t stand to make her so upset. But I couldn’t even tell her that I never wanted it to be that way. I didn’t want to not work. I didn’t want to make her cry. I just wanted the thoughts to not be there.

“Why are you doing this to your mother?” my dad asked one night, as the three of us sat around the kitchen table. “She is sacrificing her time to teach you, and you aren’t even trying to work with her.”

I will forever remember that lonely tear that streamed down my mom’s face at that moment. My best friend, teacher, and care-taker had now become someone I had deeply wounded by unintentionally fighting against her.

I never meant it. I wished I could tell my parents that I wasn’t trying to upset them. I longed to break my silence and explain my inner battle, but telling anyone the horrible thoughts I was having would show them how terrible of a person I really was. So I sat there in silence that night, unable to respond with even one word, because whatever I said would be turned into another obscene thought in my mind. I couldn’t let that happen, because it might get me thrown into Hell forever.

“Why won’t you answer me?” my dad said.

“I—I…” I couldn’t get the words out. Another thought had come into my mind, and I had to be sure I canceled it properly before going on. “I—just… I don’t know. I am—I can’t.” The thoughts were overwhelming my mind again, and I was terrified that I wouldn’t be able to know I had cancelled them properly if I said anything else.

I couldn’t handle seeing my parents so upset anymore. I ran upstairs and slammed the door to my room and cried. Why was this happening to me? How could I have let my mind become so out of control? I knew I had no control over the thoughts, yet I was somehow convinced they were all my fault.

If there is one thing I would have told my parents back then if I could have (besides telling them that I actually had an autoimmune disorder causing all my OCD and strange behaviors), I would tell them that I hated what I had become and what I was doing to them. I would tell them that I didn’t want to be doing any of it—I was simply scared out of my mind, by my own mind.  I wished I could have told them that all the pain I caused them was wounding me even more.

I longed for my parents to understand the constant terror that I lived in and the feeling of utter hopelessness so that they could see I wasn’t just being a brat. I wanted to not feel like I was so alone. But I was afraid that talking about the thoughts would end up proving to me and everyone else that I really was a reprobate. As painful as it was, it seemed like the only thing I could do was to keep pretending that my silence and school-refusal was just me being a rebellious preteen.

After three months in a perpetual state of OCD fear and bizarre and even dangerous behaviors, I finally began to come out of the flare. Looking back, I had been having joint pain, fatigue, and consistent low-grade fevers throughout the entire episode—symptoms of another strep-related illness called Rheumatic Fever. When these began to disappear, so did all my psychiatric symptoms. (Of course, my pediatrician at the time never even thought to do a strep culture and wrote it all off as “depression” and “isolation from homeschooling.”)

It took five years of time passing and me eventually being able to name my intrusive thoughts and compulsions as OCD before I would even let my parents bring up anything about what happened in 2007. When I came out of the flare sometime in early 2008, I apologized profusely for the wounds I unwillingly made in my relationship with them. But those wounds did heal, and my brain is healing, too. Today, my parents and I have a great relationship, and of course, now they understand what I was dealing with—and they remind me it was never my fault.

I wish I could have told my parents in 2007 where things would be today.  I wish they could have seen me now, in my right mind, going to college.  I wish I could have told my parents that, even though I was going to have another terrible flare at nineteen that led to a misdiagnosis of narcolepsy, made me temporarily lose the ability to walk, and caused a tic disorder to appear overnight, we would finally find the answer to all of my strange symptoms.  I wish I could have told my parents that even though my case was extreme, I was going to get 100% better.

Most of all, I would tell my parents “thank-you” for persevering through my strange behavior in 2007, for not giving up on finding a diagnosis, and for sticking by me as I continue to recover today.

3 Months Post-IVIG: A Wild Ride

Today is the three month anniversary of my IVIG treatment. It’s hard to believe it’s already been that long, but at the same time, it seems like an eternity ago because the last three months have been such a wild and difficult ride.

So far, the main improvement I’ve seen is with the chorea and tics. I’m starting to have a lot of days where they’re barely noticeable. The chorea is usually just a slight arm or leg jerk here or there—I don’t look like I’m constantly dancing anymore. I can actually sit still!

I've ditched the cane!

I’ve ditched the cane!

As for the walking issues/muscle weakness, that has improved significantly. In June, I could barely walk across the room without my legs giving out on me. I would be trying to walk normally, and suddenly my legs would become momentarily paralyzed so that my knees gave out and I fell to the floor.

Now, I often only have a couple minor knee-buckling episodes each day, and I’m usually able to catch myself before I go all the way down. These days, it just looks like a slight “hiccup” in my step when it happens.  I’m so glad I no longer have to walk around wearing knee pads while trying to stop the falls with a cane…

So has it been steady progress since my infusion? Absolutely not—especially when it comes to the mental symptoms. I have yet to see much improvement in my OCD or social anxiety. They’re both almost to the point of being out-of-hand.

As far as depression goes, I’m having some very good days when I’m hardly depressed at all, but I’ve also had some horrible days where I hate my life and just want to do nothing but lie in my room by myself and sleep.  Sometimes, everything just makes me cry for no reason. (Well, it is for a reason: brain inflammation.)

But that’s not even the worst of it. I’m having a relapse of my sleep disorder.  I cannot stay awake during the day, no matter how many hours I sleep at night.  If I sit down anywhere for ten minutes, I’ll fall asleep. The other day, I even fell asleep while standing up in a lab and nearly fell onto some expensive equipment on the lab bench. Oops…

So unfortunately, I’m still living up to my name: the Dreaming Panda.

I’m trying to stay positive about everything. I’m trying to think about how great it is to be able to walk again and to be able to sit completely still during class. But it’s hard. It’s really hard sometimes—especially when you’re so sleepy that you’re living in a dream world where everything seems unreal and a bit far away.  And let’s not forget how OCD and anxiety can confuse your world, too… (I have an entire future post dedicated to discussing this).  How do you see through the chaos of a brain that isn’t quite working normally yet?

But still, three months later, even though it’s been frustratingly slow, my progress towards recovery is becoming undeniable.  As hard as these months have been, I’m told that three to four months post-IVIG is usually the beginning of major improvements in PANS/PANDAS symptoms.  So yes, this eight-year nightmare must finally be coming to an end…

Signs of Hope

For the first time in four months, one night, suddenly, I realized my choreiform movements were gone. When I woke up the next morning, my body felt completely different. That night, I felt a tingling session in my head and legs, as if my brain were healing itself. The next morning, I had a sense of the disease departing from me, and people were even telling me that my “energy” was different. For the first time in several months, I was enjoying my life again.

Since those wonderful two days last week, I have had some mentally rough days, although the chorea and tics continue to be quite mild. Could the IVIG actually be starting to work? I think I’m daring to hope that it is.

So far, this whole healing process has been a lot of ups and downs—perhaps mostly downs for the first month. But every once in a while, I get a really good day or two, and it seems like the good days keep getting better. I’m just hoping that the bad days keep getting less bad until, eventually, a bad day is only what a normal person would think of as a bad day—maybe just feeling a bit tired because I didn’t sleep enough, or something like that.

I just passed the two-month mark since my IVIG treatment in August. I was told it could take as much as 3-6 months before major improvement, so this is a good sign. I still haven’t been able to come off the steroids, but I’m still better off now than I was two months ago on a higher dose. Even though it doesn’t seem like it sometimes, I think I’m finally starting to get better. I have hope now that I really am going to beat PANDAS.

IVIG and the Waiting Game…

IVIG: Intravenous Immunoglobulin from 1000 donor antibodies...

IVIG: Intravenous Immunoglobulin from 1000+ donors

So I just got back from IVIG, and it really wasn’t that bad. I did it over two days, with the first day lasting about four hours and the second for six. I still have headaches from it, a bit of nausea, and some fatigue, but I don’t really care, because I feel hopeful that the therapy will give me my life back.  These temporary side effects are such a small price to pay for my freedom.

Now, I just have to wait for the positive effects to kick in—and hope and pray that they actually do kick in at all. Apparently, for most people, it takes three to six months to see a big improvement, but sometimes you start feeling better in a couple weeks. It can take up to a year for all the PANS/PANDAS symptoms to disappear completely. Occasionally, IVIG doesn’t work at all. But my nurse said to me, “Don’t worry. If you responded really well to steroids, IVIG is going to work.”

I don’t usually show my emotions much, but I broke down and cried as soon as she said that. Could one IVIG really heal me? Yes, it should. The thought that this eight-year ordeal is going to end and the idea that I will know what it’s like to feel good again—well… It’s overwhelming. But I’m ready for it.

A Day in the Life of Recovery

The strange thing about my condition is how suddenly it changed everything about me and my daily experience. Four months ago, though I was sick, you wouldn’t have known it—unless you happened to notice me nodding off in class, day after day, after consistent eight or nine-hour nights of sleep—or if you noticed the ever-increasing amount of dents in my car from suddenly not being able to tell where the edges of my car were. But now, with one look at me trying to walk across a room, it’s extremely obvious that something is going in my brain that I have no control over. Welcome to my new world of PANDAS.

One of the hardest things about recovery is learning to be honest with yourself by being willing to admit how hard everything still is. It’s often difficult for me to explain to my friends and family just how challenging each day can be, so I decided that instead of explaining, I would tell you about what it takes to get through a typical day…

Every morning when I wake up, I have a few seconds of blissful forgetfulness before I remember that anything is wrong with me. But then there’s always that “Oh crap” moment when I suddenly realize all over again how sick I am. And I remember how many pills I have to take that day and the fact that things are bad enough that I need an IVIG in a week. For the rest of the day, I think of little besides my illness because it effects all that I do.

Everything is exhausting. I want to get out of bed, but first I must lie there for a few minutes to gather up my willpower. The first few minutes out of bed are nerve-wracking, because I’m anxious to see if my ability to control my body has improved at all. Will I fall down? Can I actually stand still while I brush my teeth? I have a few tics and arm jerks and decide that my symptoms are only slightly improved from the day before. Baby steps, I tell myself…

By the time I’ve gotten dressed and ready, I’m already worn out. But I have to go downstairs and find some kind of food I can force myself to eat so that I can take my antibiotic and steroid. My appetite is completely off, but if I don’t eat something, the meds will be too hard on my stomach, and I’ll lose even more weight (I’ve already lost a dangerous amount this summer).

As I stand at the counter preparing breakfast, it’s becoming more obvious to me that my brain is sill out-of-control. I keep involuntarily leaning forward and bending down, nearly smacking my head on the countertop multiple times. While walking across the room to grab a spoon, my knees buckle underneath me, and I fall to the floor. The frustration never seems to end…

I wish I could forget about it all. I wish it would go away, but it won’t—at least not for a few months. My recovery is going to take time, patience, and lots of courage. The trick is learning to be okay with that—and learning that the bravest thing of all is giving yourself permission to do whatever it takes to get better. No, this does not mean slowing down. To me, doing less means I’m fighting even harder.

Takin’ Roids

I’m no doctor, but recent developments have shown I almost certainly have PANDAS or PANS.

A standard way to see if symptoms are autoimmune-related is to do a steroid burst for five days. The theory is that if inflammation is the culprit, the symptoms will improve with the steroids. It doesn’t work for some true PANDAS/PANS patients if there is still an active infection like Lyme or mycoplasma causing an exacerbation.

But it worked for me. I just finished a five-day burst of Prednisone with incredible results. By the third day, I did not need any Nuvigil to stay awake, and my concentration was so good that I was able to sit down and write a paper and take a test in a timely fashion with no brain fog. My tics and walking problems also significantly lessened, though didn’t completely go away. My depression vanished. It was amazing to feel normal again!

Dare I hope that I’m not actually narcoleptic? I don’t think people with narcolepsy can suddenly stop feeling sleepy during the day. Narcolepsy is an autoimmune condition caused by the destruction of a brain chemical called hypocretin. Once the chemical is destroyed, it can’t be regenerated. Hypocretin regulates wakefulness, so if the loss of it (narcolepsy) was what was causing my sleepiness, I should not suddenly feel this awake with no stimulants. I’ll see my sleep doctor next week, and he’s going to be shocked. I wonder what he’ll say about this…

The next step is treatment with an antibiotic called Augmentin. My doctor prescribed a high dose of it for thirty days, but I’m curious to see what the PANDAS specialists will say. In the next couple weeks, I’ll be seeing an immunologist and a neurologist that specialize in treating it. I should have seen them eight years ago, but how could we have known? I’m hoping and praying that I do not have permanent brain damage from unknowingly delaying treatment for so long. But these last five days of steroids give me hope that I will soon feel normal again….

“You’re Just Tired”

So I tried Xyrem for a week, and I did sleep like a baby. It was actually wonderful—I would wake up in the morning feeling completely rested and not feeling like I needed twenty more hours of sleep. I hadn’t felt that way for eight years. But it upset my stomach so badly that I lost even more weight because I was unable to eat anything. I’m down to a hundred pounds. I was around 111 before this summer…

My doctor is just plain flummoxed by my strange reactions to meds, so he made me stop everything over the weekend—even my anti-depressant. As would be expected, I felt horrible in every way. But one of the worst parts was what someone said to me about how I would be off my meds:

“You’re just going to feel tired…”

I know that she meant no harm by what she said, and for most people, those words may have sounded like a nice sentiment. But for someone who is sick, it was a slap in the face.  I wish I knew what it felt like to get tired. Shoot, I wish I could feel tired in the sense that you think of being tired, because your definition of tired is probably my idea of a good day.  When I say I’m tired, it’s worse than if a normal person went three days without sleep.  My tired is not your tired. Your tired is as similar to mine as being able to swim one lap is to being Michael Phelps.

I’ve been sick for awhile, and often, when I’ve told people I’m tired and sleepy and how hard it is, I get a cold, “Yeah, I’m tired, too.”  Usually, people mean well and might even think they’re being sympathetic by saying they relate.  But that’s the problem—there’s no way you can even imagine my tiredness unless you’ve lived with a chronic illness.

By saying you’re also tired and sleepy like I am, you’re telling me what I’m dealing with is normal and trivial—that it’s just what everyone goes through sometimes. You’re telling me I should just suck it up and deal with it and get some sleep, because that’s what you do when you’re “tired.”  But that’s the difference—your tiredness goes away, but mine does not.

So please, never even imply that a narcoleptic “just feels tired.” That’s like saying the Pacific Ocean contains “a few gallons of water.” No, the ocean is water, and in fact, it’s the most water you’ll ever see and is bigger than you could possibly imagine until you are thrown overboard and left bobbing around by yourself in the middle of it. When you are there, you can realize what an ocean really is. I have the privilege of being stuck swimming alone in an ocean of “tired.” Don’t tell me you know how it feels to be stranded here, because I don’t see you swimming around next to me.

It’s time for all of us to stop telling people that we know how they feel, because we don’t. It’s time to stop responding to others’ pain with insensitive comments. Why can’t we just believe people when they say they hurt? Why do we tell people how they should feel? It’s not that hard to just take a moment to sit down next to someone and acknowledge that what they’re telling you must be as hard as they say it is. That’s all I’m asking—to just listen and not try to tell me what I’m facing isn’t that bad.

Why I Can’t Stand All These Meds

So, my Xyrem finally came.

For my non-narcoleptic readers, Xyrem is one of the meds used to treat narcolepsy and cataplexy, but it’s a controlled substance with only one pharmacy in the US that makes it. After getting a prescription from the doctor, I had to go through two weeks of phone calls from nurses and pharmacists at that pharmacy. The best part of one conversation went like this:

Nurse: Do you have cataplexy in addition to narcolepsy?
Me: *falls to the ground…*

(more…)

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