PANDAS & Lyme: My Recovery and 8 Years of Misdiagnoses

Posts tagged ‘Therapy’

3 Years Later… The Beginning of the End?

Celebrating 3 years of blogging and the beginning of the end of my battle?

Three years ago today, I published my first post on this blog.

At the time, I was in a downwards spiral, falling apart and losing my mind. My doctors were baffled and running out of treatment options, and I was threatening to take my life. But then, my family figured out I had PANDAS/PANS. Thus began a three-year fight to regain everything my illness had so suddenly stolen from me.

Back then, it seemed I was the only 19-year-old on the planet who was fighting for their life against this allegedly pediatric condition, PANDAS/PANS. There were no blogs written by patients—only parents. I wanted to read from someone writing about going through what I was going through; I wanted someone to show and tell me that I would be okay. Since I could find no such blogs at the time, I figured I might as well be the person to change that so that something good might come from my ordeal one day.

Today, in 2017, I can say it’s been quite a journey, but I almost dare believe I’m now 95-99% recovered. I’ve been through three high-dose IVIG treatments as well as eight low-dose IVIG infusions. I’ve endured tonsil/adenoidectomy, over a year of steroids, month after month of antibiotics, and countless therapy sessions. Although I still take medications and follow a Lyme disease antibiotic protocol, today, I’m able to live my life, and I’ve managed to accomplish things I never would’ve dared to dream when I started this blog.

So I wanted to take a moment to thank all of you for reading The Dreaming PANDA and for offering your encouragement and prayers over the last three years. I’ve probably never met any of you, but your support has meant the world to me. Thank you for taking the time to read what I write, and sometimes, to reach out to me. It can be lonely to deal with a life-altering disease, but this community has kept me going—and I sincerely hope my writing has helped you in some way, too.

I’m not quite ready to stop this blog just yet—in fact, I’m not sure if or when I ever will, since I have more readers than I ever thought I would when I first started. I don’t ever want to stop raising awareness, and I have every intention of continuing to bring hope to those of us who’ve been affected by PANS and Lyme.

For this reason, I’m planning to write a memoir in the near future, and I intend to post excerpts along the way. With any luck, however, I’m now living in the final chapter of my recovery journey.

I know a lot of you are probably out there wondering if you or your kid will ever get better and live a productive life—just as I wondered when I began writing three years ago. You might feel hopeless and think that no one can get past this. It’s often been an impossibly hard journey, but you know what? Yes, I’m okay now. And you can get there, too.

Why I Quit Therapy

Dissecting and discussing every meal isn’t helping

This week, I quit therapy.

Wait a minute… I was nearing hospitalization for anorexia just seven months ago, and my psychiatrist recently suggested intensive outpatient was reasonable, and now I’m not even addressing it at all?

Yes, that’s right… Sort of.

So am I giving up on recovery? Did I suddenly get better? Well, no. I’ve just had enough of therapy.

I’m sick of writing down every bite I put into my mouth. I’m sick of dissecting and talking about every meal. I’m sick of being told to eat more or to eat less. I’m sick of being told that my normal weight isn’t “healthy.” I’m sick of feeling brainwashed into accepting a body that I didn’t have before my disorder. I’m sick of everything being put under a microscope. I’m sick of wasting my time.

Dealing with Lyme and the other PANS symptoms is taxing enough, and recovering from an eating disorder takes total dedication. I’m simply trying to survive at this point, so something as demanding as intensive outpatient therapy is out of the question. As it is, getting myself to class for nine hours per week and doing the required work is hard enough. For that matter, I have days when I can barely get dressed. Do you really think I’m in any shape to drag myself to therapy for fifteen hours a week?

Now before you start telling me that recovery is the most important thing and that I need to put my health first, I want to say that I agree with that. In fact, I spent several months talking to a nutritionist and a therapist each week with regular check-ins with my psychiatrist, but truth be told, my eating is almost as disordered now as it was when I started (though in different ways). All those hours of therapy yielded few results.

I still count calories and restrict or binge, depending on the day (though I’m managing to maintain a consistent and healthy weight range). I still have rules about when and how I should eat. I still basically only eat soft foods/fruits (I think this is more of a sensory issue than an eating disorder fear, though). I still try to avoid restaurants like the plague, because I don’t know what they might be sneaking into my food. I don’t deny that I still need help, but the help I was getting wasn’t working.

I quit therapy because talking about food so much was only magnifying my obsessions. I quit because I’m healthy (or as healthy as someone can be with late-stage Lyme) and not in physical danger.  I quit because I simply don’t have the mental energy to try to break free from my rituals at the moment.

I’m not here to recommend others quit therapy—I know it helps a lot of people, and there were times when it seemed to help me. But for me right now, it was the right choice. I continue to hold out hope that, eventually, when my Lyme and PANS are under control, the thoughts and rituals will quiet down.  I’ve noticed that sometimes, when I’m not having PANS symptoms, the food obsessions are gone, too.  But if someday, I’m otherwise better and still have an eating disorder, I just might go back to therapy.

The One Thing I Hate More Than Therapy

Some college kids stockpile liquors, I stockpile nutrition supplements!

Some college kids stockpile liquors, but I stockpile nutrition supplements!

At 93 pounds, I was so miserable and malnourished that I didn’t even know how ill I was. At the time, when I found myself sitting in an infusion chair receiving my third IVIG, I silently wondered to myself what I was doing there. How could I have PANDAS if I wasn’t “that sick”? Why was I getting such a heavy-handed treatment? But with my weight nearing the so-called “starvation” range, many of my organs weren’t working properly anymore. My psychiatrist warned that I’d be in the hospital soon.

Three weeks later, I now realize IVIG probably saved my life. Thanks to the IVIG and accompanying steroids, my food-related fears were 75% gone within the first few days after treatment, and they’ve continued to die down. Unfortunately, the damage to my body was already done. Even though I was having less mental torment related to food, I still had to repair my malnourished body and regain at least seventeen pounds. But how?

While there are standards and scientific studies on recovering from Anorexia Nervosa, there’s little in the literature on recovering from PANDAS-related anorexia, so my doctors, my family, and I have found ourselves in uncharted territory, trying to figure out how best to treat me. How much of the anorexia treatment protocol applies to someone who never had body-image issues? Should I be forbidden to know my weight while recovering? Should I, too, be prevented from exercise for six months, even though I never exercised compulsively?

At the moment, the consensus is that I not only have to do all of my usual immune-system treatments for PANS, but I have to follow many of the standard treatments for Anorexia Nervosa. For example, I see a nutritionist every week and send her lists of everything I eat. I have weekly weigh-ins without being told the number. I do therapy with the psychiatrist, who also oversees the medical aspects of recovery. And I’ll soon participate in an eating disorder support group. The hope is that if I have a PANS flare that compels me to restrict again, therapy will give me more tools to fight back while I wait for medical treatments to kick in. Plus, regardless of my mental state, my body is damaged, and I need the professional help of a nutritionist to be sure my eating is conducive to healing.

However, now that I’m feeling so much better both mentally and physically, all of this therapy seems excessive… Actually, to be honest, I hate all of my anorexia treatments, and I’ve been doing my best to convince my parents and my team that I don’t need so much help.

In many ways, this feels like a repeat of my sentiments towards my weekly Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy sessions for OCD when I was seventeen. I knew I needed to go to them, but I abhorred every minute because I felt so embarrassed discussing the obsessions I’d always kept to myself.  At home, I often got into heated arguments with my parents about why I shouldn’t have the next appointment, I kept saying I was “just fine,” and I threatened to stop attending when I turned eighteen. But I stuck with it because the one thing I hated more than therapy was how my illness had ruined my life.

Similarly, now, I despise every trip to the nutritionist, every measurement on the scale, every mention of target BMI’s, every entry in my food diary. I want to block out that whole torturous, food-obsessed chapter of my life and forget it ever happened, but therapy brings to light the havoc anorexia wreaked upon my body and my life.  I hate that my doctors apparently think I can’t even be trusted to feed myself.  I hate the regimented meal-planning that therapy brings.  I hate how much of my day I spend working on recovery.  I hate that I feel like I’m in puberty all over again, because my body is starting to look different and feel strange (and I’m waiting for my period to come, just like a preteen).

But you know what? As much as I hate being treated for anorexia, I hate how life was at 93 pounds even more—I was so tormented and hemmed in by my obsessions and compulsions about food that I couldn’t see I was no longer living. If doing therapy on top of my medical treatments for PANS means giving me the best chance at never going back to that dark place, then so be it.

When I was discharged from weekly OCD therapy three years ago, I was indescribably grateful for the support my family and therapists had given me towards regaining my life. I discovered a freedom that I never dreamed was possible, because my family had pushed me to go to therapy. In the same way, as much as I don’t like to admit it now, I think I’ll look back someday and be grateful that my parents and doctors made me get treated for anorexia.

Goodbye, Anorexia?

Did I really eat a restaurant without having a panic attack?

Did I really eat a restaurant without having a panic attack?

This week, I reached a turning point in recovering from my eating disorder.

Up until now, although I’ve known how destructive my restricting has been to my body and though part of me wanted to stop, anorexia had so much control over me that I wasn’t completely willing to give it up. I said a few weeks ago that I was going to start treatment for it, but honestly, I was so depressed the day of the appointment that I couldn’t get out of bed and just cancelled it.

But one day this week, I looked in the mirror and saw my ribcage awkwardly jutting out in front of what was left of my stomach. I’d now lost seventeen pounds and weighed less than I did in sixth grade. I noticed bones in places that I’d never seen before. I realized how terrible I felt all the time: I was always cold, I had headaches every day, I couldn’t fall asleep, my brain was foggy, and I was constantly forgetting things. All of my POTS symptoms were suddenly getting worse, too. Recent blood work showed anemia, and my doctor told me I’d be in the hospital soon if I didn’t start eating more. Most frightening of all, I was having constant chest pain, which could’ve be a sign that my body was starting to break down the heart muscles as it was running out of other fuel.

Indeed, I was slowly dying. Then again, anorexia had so taken me over that I wasn’t really living anymore anyway. I was terrified to think of being in the hospital with a feeding tube—but I was even more afraid to eat. How could anything change?

I wish it were as simple as just “snapping out of it” and deciding to eat more, but it’s not. The idea of eating an extra one hundred calories is enough to send me into a panic attack. My brain screams at me to restrict so loudly that I can no longer hear the voice of reason. Even when I know it could kill me eventually, anorexia has so much control over me that I will fight with everything I am to continue to restrict. I am a slave to my own torment.

Nevertheless, I found freedom this week with my third round of IVIG. I don’t understand it, but yesterday, I ate all three meals without even trying to count the calories—usually, I have to plan everything out ahead of time and be sure I’m not going to eat “too much.” I’m normally extremely anxious about going to restaurants because it’s so much harder to count the calories, but yesterday, it was fine; I enjoyed my meals like a normal person. It’s like that terrible demon called Anorexia has left me.

You see, with every IVIG infusion, I get a dose of a steroid called Solumedrol. In the past, I’ve noticed immediate relief from symptoms because of it, so if there was any doubt that my anorexia was related to brain inflammation, it’s gone now—you’re not supposed to get better from anorexia just because you had some steroids and immunoglobulins. But the real question is: will I stay better?

As I finish up this third round of IVIG today, I’m bracing myself for the post-IVIG flare that I always have two weeks later. I’ve decided to continue to see the psychiatrist every week for therapy, because I don’t want the restriction to creep back in. I’ve told my parents how they can hold me accountable, so that they can help be sure I don’t lose any more. I’m calling a nutritionist, because even if I were somehow totally “cured” of the mental aspects of anorexia, I still have to recover from the physical consequences of malnourishment.

I don’t know if or when this eating disorder will come back to enslave me again, but I do know that this time, I’m not going to listen. I reached my physical and mental breaking point this week, and I never want to go there again. Life has more to offer than starving myself and being tormented by food. I don’t like to think of what would happen if I continued with that, so I’m running as fast as I can toward recovery.

Goodbye, anorexia. Hello, life.

Treatment Is a Kitchen Sink?

Treating PANS can mean trying the whole kitchen sink.

Treating PANS can mean trying the whole kitchen sink.

When I was first diagnosed with PANDAS in 2014, my doctor said the treatment plan was to give me “the whole kitchen sink.” In other words, I would receive the full range of therapies, many of them all at once. It was unscientific, since this made it hard to tell which treatments turned out to be the most effective, but for a girl who could hardly walk and had lost over 10% of her body weight, this approach was necessary.

Today, I can say with confidence that the kitchen sink worked for me, because I’m back in school and thriving, with only mild difficulties.

So many of you have asked me what exactly I did that got me better—the majority of the emails I receive from readers are questions about my treatments. Because of this, I’ve decided to do a series of posts on the various treatments I’ve used, what they were like, and how I responded (or not). I probably won’t do all the posts consecutively—if something else inspires me on a given week, I’ll interrupt the series.

You see, the problem with treating PANS is that the lack of diagnostic tests makes it impossible to know which treatment will provide the most relief. What worked for me won’t work for someone else. What worked for others didn’t always work for me.

Even worse, nearly all of the treatments available take weeks, if not months, to produce results, so by the time you know something didn’t work, you have to start all over again and hope the next thing you try will do the job. Meanwhile, you’re miserable and hardly yourself because of your plethora of debilitating symptoms. I can’t even begin to express how agonizing the process can be when you’re not making progress, and you’re wondering how much longer until your treatments help you get better—or if you’ll ever get better at all.

Moreover, because of the lack of awareness and the lack of doctors with PANDAS experience, there’s no one to hold your hand through the recovery journey. The PANDAS specialists are overrun with cases and can’t speak to you often enough, and you’re fortunate if you can find a local doctor to simply refill your antibiotics—let alone to provide treatment guidance.

The fact that dozens of parents ask advice from a twenty-year-old with no formal medical training who writes a blog from her dorm room—this tells you everything you need to know about how hungry people are for information, hope, and support when dealing with PANS. On the other hand, there are many things one can learn from a patient that can never be gleaned from cold facts presented in medical journals.

All of this is to say that I’m going to be doing this series to hopefully make the treatment journey less scary for those in the middle of it. I’m not here to suggest any particular methods for others, but I hope by going into more detail about what I did, people might better understand what to expect after having made their own decisions with their doctors.

When my doctor first told me about the “kitchen sink,” I never could’ve imagined how many kinds of treatments I would try before getting completely better.  Recovering from PANS is the hardest thing I’ve ever done, but all that matters is that something worked for me—or more likely, several things worked together.

So readers, I hope you’ll come gather round my kitchen sink in these next few posts, and we’ll talk about this treatment and recovery journey that we’re all on together.

The Day Recovery Began…

I never imagined what could result from an iPod and a Google search...

I never imagined what could result from an iPod and a Google search…

As I approach final exams this week, I’ve been thinking back to three years ago, when my life changed forever, on December 17th, 2012.

At the time, I was seventeen and in my senior year of high school. I was excelling academically, and people told me I’d have a promising career. I was popular with lots of friends. I felt such a sense of freedom in being an “adult” by learning to drive. I thought the possibilities for my future were endless.

But in an afternoon, my whole world collapsed.

One Saturday at the end of November, out of nowhere, I became convinced I’d committed an unforgivable sin. Suddenly, blasphemous intrusive thoughts constantly filled my mind, and I was consumed with trying to “cancel them out” with silent mental rituals. If I didn’t, I might go to Hell. Overnight, my OCD transformed from mild to an extreme case—though I was still undiagnosed. Little did I know, it was the beginning of a three-year PANS exacerbation.

After that day, my life went from being wonderful to being a living Hell.

Sometimes, I realized how irrational my obsessions were. I would know I was a Christian, and I found it unbelievable to think that a loving God would throw me into Hell over some upsetting thoughts. Other times, I spent every waking moment trying to stop the intrusive thoughts, in constant terror that I was damned and beyond hope.

Sadly, it wasn’t the first time I’d endured this torment. Six years earlier, my OCD had abruptly started in the same way, and since then, it had come and gone. From the time I was eleven, blasphemous intrusive thoughts happened throughout each day, but I eventually learned to pay them no attention. I never told anyone. But suddenly, in 2012, the thoughts took over my life again and couldn’t be ignored, and I felt like they would throw me off the face of the earth at any moment.

Everything came to a head the weekend before my final exams. I couldn’t study, because the thoughts were constant, as were my futile attempts to stop or cancel them. I couldn’t write anything without checking and rechecking to be sure something didn’t have a blasphemous double-meaning. I couldn’t say certain words at all (like “bad” or “evil”), because I feared they would cause another blasphemous thought. It felt like there was a knife lodged into my conscience, tearing down to the core of who I was, and with every thought, it only cut deeper.

On December 17th, after three weeks of mental and spiritual agony, I’d reached the end of my rope. I saw I had to do something besides keep trying to cancel the thoughts, because the torture was only worsening. I stepped back and began to wonder if maybe, just maybe, I had a mental disorder causing it all. Maybe I wasn’t eternally doomed. Maybe none of it was my fault. And then I remembered a Reader’s Digest article from that March which mentioned OCD involved repetitive, unwanted thoughts.

After a Google search and two minutes on the OCD Wikipedia page, I knew.

It’s impossible to describe the hodgepodge of emotions in that moment on December 17th… I was so relieved to discover that my misery had a name—and a hope of ending. I was comforted to realize I wasn’t alone. I was shocked to find out I’d had a serious mental disorder for all those years. I was terrified, because I knew without a doubt that I finally had to speak up and get help. But most of all, I was hopeful, because I knew life could get better.

I wish I could say that everything got easier after that day, but because my family couldn’t convince local doctors to treat me for PANS (which we began to suspect as the underlying cause), December 17th was only the beginning of my fight against various debilitating neurological symptoms that would soon come.

Three years later, it’s been an incredibly long road to get to the freedom I have now (and I’m still fighting in some ways).  I’ve endured months of Exposure-Response Prevention therapy, two IVIG’s, tonsillectomy, lots of antibiotics and other medicines, and drastic lifestyle changes, but PANS no longer runs my life—nor does OCD.

As December 17th comes and goes this week, I can’t help but be grateful for the day, because my discovery and my parent’s research on OCD that followed is what ultimately led to my PANS diagnosis—and eventual recovery.

But more so, December 17th now makes me question… What about all the other people who have OCD but are too scared and confused to get help? How many more cases of PANS will go undiagnosed for eight years because people conceal their OCD so well? My situation was not unique, so I believe more awareness for OCD and PANS among parents, psychologists, doctors, and even children, will bring December 17th faster for more people.

OCD No More?

Leaving a switch on can be bad news for my OCD...

Leaving a switch on can be bad news for my OCD…

Ever since my tonsillectomy, I’ve noticed my OCD dying down significantly. I’ve found myself touching cabinet knobs in the kitchen that I haven’t been able to touch in over a year. I’m not checking my room for people trying to hurt me. I’m not washing my hands all the time.

I’ve been in CBT all summer, but the improvement I’ve seen seemed to happen much more suddenly and with much less effort than what I normally get from using therapy techniques alone. It was as if maybe, I had less brain inflammation, because I no longer had an infection in my tonsils.

But one evening, I was in the car with my parents heading to church, and out of nowhere, the OCD thoughts came roaring back:

You didn’t turn off the stereo, so now the whole house is going to burn down while you’re gone. You didn’t bring your computer with you in the car, you haven’t backed it up, and now, you’re going to lose five years of work when it burns up.

My heart began to race as I wrung my sweaty hands together in the back seat.

“Hey… I left the stereo on. Do you think that’s okay?” I asked my parents.

“Yes, that’s fine. Nothing will happen,” my mom assured me.

But that wasn’t enough. My brain wanted me to ask again and again, or better yet, go back home and turn everything off.  I wanted some reassurance that my thoughts were lying to me (even though part of me knew it was all ridiculous). But after the months of therapy I’ve been through, I knew that no matter how long I kept asking, I’d never get the certainty I craved.  So I stopped and sat there with the anxiety instead.

It wasn’t easy, though. The anxiety felt like someone was scraping their fingernails against a chalkboard inside my head. It was as if I had to crawl out of my skin, but I couldn’t. OCD is like a little brother that keeps poking you all day long, no matter how many times you ask him to stop.

But like a naughty little brother, if you can learn to ignore him and not react, eventually, he will go away.

To calm my anxiety, I tried some “box breathing:” inhale for five seconds, hold your breath for five seconds, exhale for five seconds, hold your breath for five seconds again, and repeat. I’ve never been a fan of breathing exercises, but this technique actually works for me.

By the time we got to church, I was feeling much better. But of course, I was still waiting for the rest of the flare to come. If my OCD had suddenly spiked, wasn’t I going to lose myself at any moment? Wasn’t I about to start doing the chorea dance again? Wasn’t I about to fall into a deep depression? Not necessarily.

My psychiatrist told me that he expects I’ll always have a tendency toward OCD to a more mild extent, even when I’m cured from PANS. He believes that people with PANS are pre-disposed to OCD, so I shouldn’t expect it to completely go away from IVIG or tonsillectomy or any other medical treatment.

He wasn’t trying to negate that those things help OCD in people with PANS. He was just saying that, like everyone else with OCD, I have to treat it with therapy so that I know how to manage whatever tendencies and learned behaviors may be left when I’m otherwise symptom-free.

I must admit that I was a little discouraged when I heard this, but there’s a bright side if he’s right: just because I have one hour where my OCD acts up a little doesn’t mean I’m “flaring” in the PANDAS sense of the word. Just because my OCD is worse one night doesn’t mean I have to load up on Prednisone and prepare for battle. If I do have some degree of “normal” OCD, then it will simply act up occasionally, especially under stressful circumstances—but OCD can be managed.

Sure enough, the rest of the PANDAS symptoms never came that night. Maybe it was just a “flare” of regular OCD. Maybe it was a very mild PANDAS flare. No one knows. But what I do know is that, aside from that night, my OCD is dramatically better than it was a couple weeks ago.

To me, I think the most important thing for PANDA’s is to treat both the immune response causing the worst of the OCD and to do CBT to deal with the OCD in the meantime—whether it’s purely caused by inflammation or if it’s also something we’ll always be prone to.

Happy Birthday, Dreaming Panda

Cake

This week marks the one-year anniversary of my blog. To say it’s been an incredible year doesn’t even begin to describe it. I’ve come such a long way since I first started writing about this difficult journey—and so has this blog…

Last June, I’d hit rockbottom. I was in such bad shape and declining so much that I thought I’d die. Although I was otherwise dysfunctional to the point of not being able to walk, not eating, and not being able to speak coherently, I was able to write. In the countless hours my family spent researching PANDAS/PANS on the internet, they’d never found a blog written by a PANS patient. I thought maybe I could change that. I hoped that maybe by sharing my experiences, I could help someone else going through the same thing. So I started a blog.

I’ve been through so much in the last year of blogging… I finally got an official diagnosis of PANS. I had two IVIGs. I spent almost a year on Prednisone (and am still tapering off). I’ve had more horrific flares. I’ve re-started CBT/ERP therapy for my OCD. And next week, I will have a tonsillectomy and andenoidectomy. But I also ran a half-marathon and completed another year of college. Slowly, I’ve been getting my life back and shedding symptoms so gradually that I often barely notice. But yes, I’m getting better.

As I’ve shared every step of my recovery, I’ve had many amazing responses from you all. Some parents have said that what I’ve written has helped them understand what their child must be going through. Some have shared stories that make me cry—sometimes because of how much the person is struggling, other times because of an astounding recovery. Some parents have said my writing makes them cry because their family is going through the same thing. Some people have said things that helped give me the courage to keep fighting. Plus, I’ve had the opportunity to meet other teens with PANS.

The act of publishing my experiences (albeit anonymously) for the world to see has been of tremendous therapeutic value for myself, too.  Sometimes, writing has been the only thing I could make myself do, but being able to look back and see how far I’ve come has given me hope through the bad times.

The Dreaming Panda has been a humbling and unforgettable experience, especially as I’ve watched it turn into something that means something to people. Needless to say, every comment and private message has meant so much to me, because when I find out that my writing has touched someone or helped even in a small way, it helps me feel like something good can come out of this mess. While I’m never glad to hear that someone else is going through the same terrible things, I’m glad to know that maybe I’ve made just a small difference in someone’s life. So thank you for all of your responses!

As I head into this next year, I intend to keep going with The Dreaming Panda for a long time. Eventually, I plan to expand on this blog and make a book. I may be well on my way to recovery now, but sharing my journey has made me realize that there are thousands of other kids, teens, and even adults with a similar story—and some of them are far sicker than I ever was. Tragically, our illness has yet to be recognized by most doctors, hospitals, and even insurance companies. Our story needs to be told so that someday, it won’t take so many years for many of us to find the proper treatment.

So readers, I just wanted to thank all of you for the support, encouragement, and friendship you have shared with me along the way. I’m hoping that this next year brings complete healing and recovery for all of you and for me. 🙂

P.S. I’m looking for new topics to write about. I’d love to hear some ideas from you. Please share in the comments section!

Let It Roll: OCD & Mountain Biking

Woods

Recently, I’ve taken up mountain biking, and strangely, there are a lot of parallels between becoming a mountain biker and overcoming OCD…

Ever since last summer, I’ve been apprehensive about getting on a bike, considering that my legs used to give out on me frequently when I walked. If one of these attacks happened as I rode a bike at 20 mph down a road, I could get seriously hurt.

But this week, I got back on my bike anyway and rolled into the woods, following a friend of mine who’s an avid mountain biker.

At first, the trail was smooth and wide, and I felt great. But then, to my horror, a patch of roots and rocks showed up right in front of me.  I braked hard and skidded to a stop.

“How can anyone ride over that?” I said.

“Just let it roll. Don’t think about it too much.”

Being a beginner, every little rock in the trail seemed like something to worry about. Surely my little bike tires couldn’t handle all that, right? But soon, I began to discover that things that seemed like a big deal really didn’t matter.

This is how the intrusive thoughts of OCD are. I have all kinds of crazy and upsetting thoughts popping into my head like the little bumps in the trail. My instinct is to put on the brakes and try to “go around” the thoughts by carrying out compulsions. But if I just let myself roll through them without being afraid they’ll send me over the handlebars, I end up having far less trouble. No matter how scary the thoughts seem, they’re only thoughts—they can’t hurt you if you just keep rolling.

As the day went on, I got more and more confident in my abilities. Before long, I was barreling down the trail over much larger roots and rocks. True, I was sometimes afraid of what I saw approaching, but I chose to ride over those things anyway. It wasn’t so much that I’d become a more skilled biker in a couple hours—it was that I’d simply begun to believe I could make it through the obstacles.

Similarly, the first time I went through CBT, learning to not carry out my compulsions initially seemed impossible. How could I possibly roll through the intrusive thoughts without canceling them? How could I get through my exposures? Over time, I began to learn that I could survive the anxiety that came with not doing my compulsions or following my rules. Before long, I was rolling through all kinds of terrible thoughts without doing any compulsions—and nothing bad ever happened. Once I’d tackled the smaller rocky thoughts, I could later learn to ignore the bigger, more challenging ones.

After several miles of biking through wooded, rocky, twisty trails, we rode back to the car, exhausted but high on endorphins. I was muddy and had a few scrapes from occasionally riding too close to thorn bushes, but guess what? I’d made it, even though I wasn’t sure I could. I never crashed once and had somehow had a blast.

“You know, I think you’re a natural at this,” my friend told me.

“Thanks! It must be my running legs,” I said.

But I know that it wasn’t just my fitness. It was because I’d had plenty of practice learning to push past fear and anxiety thanks to eight months of OCD therapy. Who knows? Maybe it can work the other way around, too. Maybe mountain biking will make me more confident about facing my fears in this summer’s CBT sessions…

IVIG#2, Two Months Later

Wellbutrin XL: The Latest Addition to My Daily Pile of Meds

Wellbutrin XL: The Latest Addition to the Daily Pile of Meds & Supplements

As my two-month IVIG follow-up approached, I was sure I would have bad news no matter what. It would be bad news if my doctor decided I needed an invasive plasmapheresis treatment. It would be just as bad if she told me we had to “wait and see” if this second IVIG worked, because certain symptoms were still making me miserable.

Well, I didn’t exactly get either piece of news. We made a plan that involved neither option…

In the last few weeks, I’ve realized that my OCD is about to get completely out-of-hand, and I’ve also been slipping back into depression.  And this wasn’t a mild depressive episode—my depression turned me into an unrecognizable lump of a human being, exhausted by even the simplest tasks and unable to enjoy anything at all.

Yet as awful as I’ve been feeling mentally and emotionally, all my other symptoms are disappearing, so the IVIG is starting to work.  Given a few more months, maybe I’ll be completely cured…

Today, I have no sign of a sleep disorder of any kind.  I no longer need Nuvigil to stay awake during the day or any kind of sleep aid to fall asleep at night.  This, on its own, is a miracle, considering that a year ago, my sleepiness was so constant and severe that I was misdiagnosed with Narcolepsy and told I would never get better…

I can go for hours at a time without having any tics or choreiform movements, and when I do have them, they’re hardly noticeable.  It’s quite a transformation from someone who was involuntarily thrashing around violently in the ER eleven months ago.  I do still occasionally have my legs lock up on me when I walk, but I haven’t fallen down in weeks—and I used to fall at least 100+ times per day…

I should also mention that my memory and concentration are coming back, and I’m no longer having that feeling of being completely “out-of-it” or “not there.”  Even though I’m depressed, I have a mental clarity that I didn’t have a few months ago.

If it weren’t for my OCD and depression, I could almost just live with this disease without much complaint now.  But let’s face it—OCD and depression, even if you didn’t have all the other PANS symptoms, can be far more than anyone should have to deal with.

“Have you tried CBT for your OCD?” my neurologist asked.

“I mean, I did eight months of it a couple years ago…”

“I think you need to do it again. Your brain is ready for it now.”

Strangely, I found myself almost feeling happy about the idea of going back to therapy—not because I enjoy it (I actually hate it), but because I’m ready to get rid of my OCD and social anxiety. I was considering going back to therapy before my doctor recommended it, but now that she told me I should do it, I really didn’t have any excuse not to go. I remember how hard ERP therapy was two years ago, but the freedom I gained was so worth it. I know it’s still not going to be easy this time around, but it’s time to send my OCD packing, once and for all.

But what about my depression?

We have a solution—I’m now taking Wellbutrin XL, and after a few days on it, I’ve begun to feel significantly better. I have more energy and don’t feel like I’m dragging myself through each day. I’m actually happy. I’m slowly getting back into the things I used to enjoy.

From what I understood at my appointment, my doctor said that since I no longer have as many antibodies interfering with my brain’s dopamine receptors, my body hasn’t yet re-calibrated to make the right amount of dopamine.  I think she said I don’t have enough dopamine yet, so that’s why I’m depressed.  Our hope is that the Wellbutrin will help re-balance my brain chemistry.

I’m certainly not glad that I need an anti-depressant and have to go back to therapy for my OCD, but I’m glad that things are going to get better. For that matter, I’m glad that so many of my other symptoms are far better than they once were. I’m relieved that, for now, I’m not doing any more IVIG or plasmapheresis.

Who knows? Maybe this really is the beginning of the end…

Bring Me Back

Plane

As spring break approached, I did everything I could to avoid answering that dreaded question: “What are you doing over break?”

“Oh, I’m just taking a short trip to the city and then going home and resting,” I told most people.

But the whole truth is that I’ll be sitting in my doctor’s office for two days hooked up to an IV to get a bunch of people’s antibodies poured into my body. The truth is that I desperately need this treatment so that my own bad antibodies will stop attacking my brain. The truth is that I’m going for my second round of IVIG to hopefully wipe out this disease once and for all.

As I’ve listened to classmates discussing their cruises, beach outings, road trips, or even their plans to remain at school, I’ve found myself feeling resentful.  It isn’t the fact that I don’t get to spend the week on a beach with my friends—it’s the fact that I don’t have the freedom to choose not to do so.  My symptoms are severe enough that the only reasonable spring break for me is to get more treatment. What can I do? I have to go back for IVIG.

IVIG round 2––I'm partying so hard over spring break!

This is how I’m partying over spring break…

With so many emotions—hope, fear, anxiety, and more—I stepped into a cab after my last Friday class and headed to the airport to go home.  But it wasn’t that easy: my mom had to call the cab for me, because my social anxiety has been so bad lately.

Getting through the airport to go home was even more difficult because of my brain fog. These days, I walk around with a constant sense that I’ve forgotten to do something or that I’ve lost something. And sometimes, I get very confused by everyday things. Getting through an airport in that state was truly an accomplishment.

As I finally sat at my gate, amazed at how “off” and not completely present I was, I knew in my heart of hearts that, in spite of how much I wished to have a “normal” college spring break, it was time to go home.

Yes, I’m ready to be brought back. 

Oh, IVIG, please bring me home. Bring me back to who I am. Bring me back to the days when OCD didn’t force me to make everything “just right.” Bring me back to the days when I wasn’t afraid of everyone. Bring me back to the days when I wasn’t in constant pain. Bring back my memory. Bring back my concentration. Bring back my mental clarity. Bring back my mind. Bring back my health. Most of all, bring back my hope.

One way or another, I’m going home. It may not be this flight, this trip, and this treatment that gets me there, but somehow, I will find my way. I’m going to go home. Something, someday, will bring me back.

The Blame Game

After eight years of searching for a diagnosis and then finally discovering I had PANDAS, it wasn’t enough for my family and I to simply know what my illness was. We wanted to know what caused it and who or what could be responsible:

Why did I get sick? What could’ve been done so that this never would’ve happened?

We blamed the doctors for brushing me off for eight years. We blamed them for not being willing to consider thinking outside the box. We blamed them for giving me more and more diagnoses while never stepping back to consider a single cause for all of them—while we insisted there had to be one.

We blamed the psychologists for completely missing my severe OCD at my evaluation in 2008. We blamed them for telling my parents I simply had “social problems,” when in reality, my OCD symptoms were preventing me from expressing myself to the evaluators. We blamed them for not considering OCD avoidance behavior as an explanation when they knew my brother and much of my dad’s family had OCD.

I blamed myself for not talking to anyone about my obsessions for six years.  I blamed myself for unknowingly concealing the one condition (OCD) that eventually led to a PANDAS diagnosis.  I blamed myself for not trying harder to get better after I first got sick. I blamed myself for catching the mono that led to this terrible flare last year. I blamed myself for not believing I would get better after my first IVIG, and somehow, causing it to fail.

My parents blamed themselves for not knowing I had OCD for six years. They blamed themselves for not trying harder to find an answer. They blamed themselves for “letting” this happen. They blamed themselves for passing on the autoimmune disease genes/rheumatic fever history that may have contributed to my illness.

Yes, it’s true that some of the doctors and therapists I saw over the years made mistakes and didn’t try hard to find an answer. It’s true that we would’ve found out I’d had PANDAS sooner if I’d been able to talk about my OCD. And yes, it’s true that I’ve probably inherited my parents’ bad genes.

But in the end, no one can truly be blamed for my illness.

Why do people try to find something or someone to blame for the bad things that happen?  Why does there have to be an answer?

The moment I admit that my disease is no one’s fault is the moment I admit that I have no control over it.  It means admitting that bad things can and do happen for no apparent reason.  This idea—this realization—is terrifying.

At the same time, I find freedom and hope in it.  I’m not mad at the doctors anymore, and I’ve come to understand that my family and I have done nothing but the best that we could for all these years, given the information we had at the time.

The hardest thing has been to realize that none of this was ever my own fault. It’s taken two years for me to be able to forgive myself for concealing my OCD for over a third of my life, but I’m slowly learning to extend the same compassion I have for others to myself.  I call it the Reverse Golden Rule:

“Give yourself the same grace you give to others. Don’t be so hard on yourself.”

Yes, even after my brain has healed completely, it will take a long time for my family and I to truly release ourselves of feeling responsible, in some illogical way, for what happened.  But I’m ready to stop playing the blame game. As hard as it is, it’s time to let go and focus on the hope I have of complete recovery…

Slamming the Door on OCD

It’s just a doorknob—just a little piece of metal attached to my door. For most people, it’s an overlooked necessity that doesn’t get a second thought. But for me, it’s a peril.

Until a few days ago, I’d gone the entire school year without ever touching my bathroom’s doorknob. I avoided this by either leaving the door cracked enough to let me use my feet to open the door, or I grabbed the doorknob with a designated washcloth that I kept nearby. Unfortunately, I often don’t touch any other doorknobs or handles of any kind in the rest of my apartment, either—not the refrigerator, not the microwave, not the cabinets, and not even the doorknob to my own bedroom.

I had been bothered by this set of compulsions for a long time, but the idea of going through Exposure-Response Prevention therapy to get rid of them seemed like much more work and trouble than just continuing to follow my rules—until I kept getting texts from my roommate kindly asking me to stop slamming doors.

I was rather confused at first. I had no idea I was slamming doors, but after a lot of thinking, I realized that some of my compulsive behaviors had become completely unconscious. I realized that a lot of the time, the only way I was closing a door hands-free involved slamming it.

To make matters worse, my roommate told me she has phonophobia: fear of loud sounds. Every time I closed the doors my way, she got debilitating anxiety. (We’re quite a pair aren’t we? The OCD girl’s compulsions set off the phobic girl’s anxiety.)

One part of me was mad that anyone would dare ask me to stop my compulsions, and I was embarrassed that they’d gotten so bad that I couldn’t. Another part of me, knowing how disruptive anxiety can be, felt horrible for causing my friend distress.

So this turned out to be my final straw—I now had the perfect excuse to make myself do some ERP to get over the door-closing compulsion.

That night, I decided to do the unthinkable: grabbing the bathroom doorknob without a washcloth and without washing my hands afterwards. As I trudged over to the door, my heart began to pound. My legs started shaking. My hands trembled as I reached for the knob. Before I could talk myself out of it, I quickly grabbed on and then stood there for at least two minutes.

My brain soon realized that touching the doorknob wasn’t dangerous after all, and my physical anxiety symptoms died down after a few more minutes. After a while, the exercise wasn’t unpleasant at all.  I did so well with this exposure that I proceeded to go touch many things in my apartment that I’m not allowed to touch.

Although I’ve since reverted back to using the washcloth on the doorknob, I’ve shown myself that it is possible to break free and not nearly as unpleasant as I’ve imagined it to be.  However, I’m still rather shocked that my OCD has once again gotten to the point where not doing a compulsion put me on the verge of a panic attack.

But you know what? Even though doorknobs have shut me into OCD again, I’ve realized that if I keep touching them, some day, they will allow me to reopen the door to my freedom.

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