PANDAS & Lyme: My Recovery and 8 Years of Misdiagnoses

Posts tagged ‘Tonsillectomy’

3 Years Later… The Beginning of the End?

Celebrating 3 years of blogging and the beginning of the end of my battle?

Three years ago today, I published my first post on this blog.

At the time, I was in a downwards spiral, falling apart and losing my mind. My doctors were baffled and running out of treatment options, and I was threatening to take my life. But then, my family figured out I had PANDAS/PANS. Thus began a three-year fight to regain everything my illness had so suddenly stolen from me.

Back then, it seemed I was the only 19-year-old on the planet who was fighting for their life against this allegedly pediatric condition, PANDAS/PANS. There were no blogs written by patients—only parents. I wanted to read from someone writing about going through what I was going through; I wanted someone to show and tell me that I would be okay. Since I could find no such blogs at the time, I figured I might as well be the person to change that so that something good might come from my ordeal one day.

Today, in 2017, I can say it’s been quite a journey, but I almost dare believe I’m now 95-99% recovered. I’ve been through three high-dose IVIG treatments as well as eight low-dose IVIG infusions. I’ve endured tonsil/adenoidectomy, over a year of steroids, month after month of antibiotics, and countless therapy sessions. Although I still take medications and follow a Lyme disease antibiotic protocol, today, I’m able to live my life, and I’ve managed to accomplish things I never would’ve dared to dream when I started this blog.

So I wanted to take a moment to thank all of you for reading The Dreaming PANDA and for offering your encouragement and prayers over the last three years. I’ve probably never met any of you, but your support has meant the world to me. Thank you for taking the time to read what I write, and sometimes, to reach out to me. It can be lonely to deal with a life-altering disease, but this community has kept me going—and I sincerely hope my writing has helped you in some way, too.

I’m not quite ready to stop this blog just yet—in fact, I’m not sure if or when I ever will, since I have more readers than I ever thought I would when I first started. I don’t ever want to stop raising awareness, and I have every intention of continuing to bring hope to those of us who’ve been affected by PANS and Lyme.

For this reason, I’m planning to write a memoir in the near future, and I intend to post excerpts along the way. With any luck, however, I’m now living in the final chapter of my recovery journey.

I know a lot of you are probably out there wondering if you or your kid will ever get better and live a productive life—just as I wondered when I began writing three years ago. You might feel hopeless and think that no one can get past this. It’s often been an impossibly hard journey, but you know what? Yes, I’m okay now. And you can get there, too.

New Year News

2016: The year I'm finally well?

2016: The year I’m finally well?

I haven’t had time to write a longer post for a few weeks, but I just wanted to assure you that I haven’t disappeared.

I’ve been away, not because I’m ill, but because I’m well. In fact, I’d say I’m the best I’ve been in the last nine years.

Contrary to what you might expect, the more often I post or tweet, the worse I’m doing. When I’m well, I get out of the house and keep very busy. When I’m ill, PANDAS takes over my life, and I can’t do much. The only thing I can do when I’m sick is write about being sick and talk to other people dealing with this disease.

I’m not sure what happened recently, but I believe I’m finally well.

Yes, that’s right.  I really did just say that: I’m well.

So what did it?  I don’t think there was any one magical treatment or supplement or diet.  It was a combination of everything I’ve done up to this point—and everything I’m still doing.

My first IVIG got me 50% back.  The second got me to 70%.  The tonsillectomy brough me to 95%, and when I switched to Azithromycin, I finally came back to myself all the way.  Prednisone and Wellbutrin made my life almost liveable while I was still less than a shadow of my former self.  Switching to paleo eating meant getting out of my body’s way while it worked with the other treatments to heal.  (I’ll elaborate on these things in a future post…)

At the moment, I don’t even think of myself as a person with PANDAS anymore—I’m a person who beat it. Sure, I still have very small involuntary movements and some tics sometimes.  And I still take medications and supplements, but I don’t feel like PANDAS has any significant effect on my quality of life.

Whether this present health and remission is permanent, remains to be seen.  I could flare again when I’m exposed to Strep.  Who knows?

I’ll be heading back to college soon, and I’ll finally be taking a full load—including one of the most difficult classes in my major.  But to me, being able to work hard is a privilege.

So, readers, that’s all I have for now.  I just wanted to share with you that I’m doing very well for a change—and I wish the same for you.

But don’t worry… I promise this blog isn’t going anywhere—I actually have quite a few posts that are almost ready (but I haven’t had time to finish them). I’ll write more when I can.

I wish all of you a Happy New Year full of health and healing!

Why PANDAS Awareness Matters

2015-awareness-basic-logo-small

As I made my way through the halls to my neurologist’s office last May, I stopped in my tracks as I saw a face I recognized. She was receiving IVIG and roaming the halls hooked up to an IV bag pole, accompanied by her mother and a nurse. She was exhausted. There was no light in her eyes. She had a sense of burden and deep sadness about her that penetrated to the depths of her soul.

Once you’ve seen the face of a child with PANDAS, you can never forget it.

Over the last year, I’ve heard so many heartbreaking stories about what this illness can do. I’ve seen the look of terror in children’s faces and the grief and weariness in the parents’ eyes. I’ve watched as my own life fell apart, flare by flare, and I’ve spent what should’ve been my best years wanting nothing more than to find my lost mind.

Although PANDAS and PANS are curable, getting a diagnosis, let alone proper treatment, is far too difficult. It took me eight years to find an answer. It took me declining so much that I could longer walk, lost twelve pounds in two weeks (that I absolutely didn’t have to lose), and was psych-ward-worthy depressed and suicidal before doctors finally admitted that there could be a single cause to an alleged list of seven different syndromes and illnesses.

And I am one of the lucky ones.

My story has a happy ending. After two IVIG’s, a tonsillectomy, and a year of antibiotics and steroids, today, though I still have symptoms and take medications, I have my life back. I’m living independently, attending a prestigious university, earning straight-A’s, and making my mark in my chosen field. But without treatment, I would still be spending my days homebound, sleeping for up to twenty hours each day, unable to walk, and constantly watched by my parents so I wouldn’t hurt myself.

Sadly, my story may still be the exception—not because PANDAS is rare, but because it is common and many people may never receive a diagnosis. PANDAS/PANS is likely responsible for as much as 25% of cases of childhood OCD and Tourette’s. As many as 1 in 200 children may have this devastating condition. While some may outgrow it, for others like me, left untreated, it could lead to a lifetime of mental illness and disability.

To make matters worse, there are only a handful of doctors in the US who are considered to be experts in treating PANDAS and PANS. Their practices are overrun with cases. Waiting lists can be long. And when you finally do get an appointment and a diagnosis, treatments such as IVIG and plasmapheresis are outrageously expensive and are often not completely covered by insurance. If you’re fortunate, antibiotics might be enough to put you into remission, but sometimes, insurance won’t cover these, either.

While thousands of children and families are suffering, too many doctors are debating whether this condition even exists. Many doctors have the nerve to send families on their way, blaming debilitating symptoms on “bad parenting” or “school stress.” If we had a dime for every time we were told PANDAS is “controversial” or “not well understood,” perhaps we could pay for our IVIG treatments!

387,000 children in America (1 in 200) need treatment and shouldn’t have to travel hundreds of miles just to find a doctor who won’t dismiss their symptoms. Tens of thousands still just need answers.

October 9th is PANDAS/PANS Awareness Day. Help us raise awareness. Help us tell more doctors and psychologists so that it doesn’t take so many years of suffering to get a diagnosis. Help us get more insurance companies to recognize PANS and cover more treatments so that more patients can get the care they need.

PANDAS/PANS needs awareness because that sad girl in the hallway is in every elementary school across America—yet many of her may never know why she suddenly lost her joy and personality.

I believe that if those of us who have been diagnosed keep making noise, there will be a day when it is unheard of for a doctor to deny the existence of such a devastating syndrome. I believe there will be a day when the only thing parents have to worry about when their child gets PANS is helping him get better—not finding a believing doctor, not wondering how they can bring a terrified and uncontrollable child across the country for a consultation, and not paying for treatment.

But until then, I will keep writing and raising awareness, because for so many, that day can’t come soon enough.

PANS Symptoms Pic-small

PANS/PANDAS is an autoimmune reaction triggered by Strep, Pneumonia, Lyme, Mono, Stress, etc. resulting in an acute onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms that can include: separation anxiety, OCD, tics, age regression, ADHD, sleep difficulties, personality changes, urinary feequency, irritability, rage, sensory sensitivities, deterioration in learning abilities, and anorexia.

Did I Lose My Mind to a… Sink?

Could a dirty sink trigger an autoimmune attack in my brain?

Could a dirty sink trigger an autoimmune attack in my brain?

Serratia marcescens… What in the world is that? An Italian dish? An exotic island town? Neither. It’s the name of a bacteria that you’ve probably never heard of—a bacteria that had taken up residence in my tonsils.

Serratia can be found anywhere, but it thrives in hospitals and in damp spaces like bathrooms. If you see a pink or orangish ring around a drain (such as mine, pictured above), it might be Serratia. Most people never have trouble living near the organism, but for some, it can cause serious problems. It can attack the heart. It can cause urinary tract infections. It can live in the gut. It can even cause bacterial meningitis. For me, having it in my tonsils was likely an ongoing trigger making my immune system attack my brain.

But I never would’ve imagined I had this bacteria in my tonsils, especially since they looked small and healthy before they were removed. Although I’ve been having fewer PANS symptoms since my tonsillectomy, I was incredibly skeptical that there would be any infection found, let alone something as strange as Serratia. For years, I’ve been accustomed to undergoing all manner of blood work and tests only to have negative results.

But the other day, as I logged into the online portal to read the pathology report on my tonsils and adenoids, I was shocked to see the words, “Serratia marcescens tonsillitis.” The bacteria were not only in both of my tonsils, but in my adenoids as well, along with white blood cells. Interestingly, there wasn’t a trace of Strep or Mycoplasma pneumoniae or MRSA or any of the other more common findings in PANDA tonsils.

After months of not knowing why I was flaring every two to three weeks, I finally had a possible explanation.

I called my GP and shared the news, and she wanted to rule out an infection in any other part of my body. This meant sticking what looked like a long Q-tip up my nose, another around my butt, having me pee in a cup, and another needle-stick in my arm for a blood culture. All of these cultures came back negative, so it turns out that I’m infection-free now!

It’s unnerving to think that I had no idea there was a terrible bacteria living in part of my body this whole time. It’s even more unsettling to realize that an occult infection was essentially making me lose my mind. This is the kind of thing that could be the premise of a Sci-fi horror movie… But it’s just real life for me.

Although having this bacteria in my tonsils could explain my very frequent flares, I will always wonder: how did I get Serratia in the first place? Maybe it was the dirty sink or my orange-stained shower curtain. Maybe it wasn’t. I’ll never know. All I know is that I’m 90-95% symptom free with my tonsils and the infection gone. Whatever provoked my immune system to attack my brain and ruin my mind is gone now.

So what’s next? I’ve gone seven weeks without a flare—the longest flare-free period in the last year. If I do have another major flare again, my doctor wants me to do a three-week course of Bactrim instead of a Prednisone burst, because maybe, I’ve been flaring whenever I’m fighting off Serratia. Unfortunately, S. marcescens is resistant to many antibiotics, including penicillan-based antibiotics, so the Augmentin XR I’ve taken since October has offered no protection against it.

As for the sink… My mom has since scrubbed it out with bleach—same with the shower curtain. In order to kill this bacteria, you need to use bleach or hydrogen peroxide; it’s resistant to many other household disinfectants. I know this because, strangely, I did a long Biology report in high school about preventing S. marcescens infections.  For all I know, the whole time, the bacteria was living in my own tonsils. Oh, the irony!

Now, I’m Serratia-free, and my bathroom appears to be, too. I may not know for sure how I became infected, but one thing is certain: I’ll never again look at another pink ring in a sink in the same way!

Tonsillectomy and… Hope?

So Many Popsicles

My breakfast, lunch, and dinner!

When I first found out that I needed a tonsillectomy, I made three appointments with three different doctors at two hospitals. While this may sound excessive, based on past experiences, I knew the first doctor or two might refuse to do the surgery as soon as I mentioned PANDAS, especially since my tonsils looked healthy on the outside.

Indeed, when my records were sent to the first doctor, my appointment was cancelled within two hours and my case passed to a different doctor in the practice.

Sadly, more often than not, telling a doctor you have PANDAS is just asking to be laughed at and dismissed. Many doctors don’t believe in PANDAS (let alone the newer term PANS) because they’re unaware of the growing research and evidence, and others don’t know enough to take it seriously.

Most doctors, if they believe PANDAS/PANS exists at all, assume it is extremely rare and only presents in a young child as an obvious, overnight onset of OCD. This is certainly the most common presentation, but according to Dr. Swedo, the idea that PANDAS only exists in prepubescent children was an arbitrary distinction for the original study. Still, in the minds of most doctors, to have me, a twenty-year-old, say I have this obscure pediatric disorder is preposterous (never mind that it started before I hit puberty).

While my case being dropped by the first doctor seemed like a bad sign, when I met with the new doctor at my appointment, he knew more about PANDAS than most and actually agreed to do the surgery after I told my story and explained the severity of my symptoms.

So that’s how I found myself last week trustingly lying in an operating room at the same hospital that had failed me so many other times over the years.

This was the hospital that discharged me from the ER last summer without a single test when I suddenly had severe chorea movements. This was the hospital whose neurologists had said PANDAS was “too poorly understood” to be considered as an explanation for my rapid decline. This was the hospital whose psychologists completely missed my severe OCD when I was twelve. Disturbingly, this was also the hospital consistently ranked as one of the best in the nation.

But last week, the hospital redeemed itself to me.

As I waited in the pre-op room, sniffing, grunting, and twitching involuntarily from my latest tics, I actually felt as though everyone not only believed me, but actually wanted to help me. I usually feel like I have to fight for every little bit of care I get, but this time, they were fighting for me. This time, I didn’t have to partially cover up my diagnosis by only saying I have Autoimmune Encephalitis (but not PANS). Everyone knew my full diagnosis, but they were all-the-more eager to help.

My operating room was crowded with residents, interns, and medical school students trying to get a look at this unusual creature—this real, live PANDA bear—because they saw that we exist outside of a “theoretical disease” briefly mentioned in their textbooks. There were whispers of my case in the halls—not because they were mocking my diagnosis as usual, but because they were fascinated. These young doctors genuinely wanted to learn about PANDAS/PANS so that someday, they could perhaps know how to treat their own patients with the disorder.

For the first time, doctors at a regular hospital were giving my illness the attention it deserves—and giving me the treatment I needed.

If there’s one word I felt to describe the day, it would be “hope.” I felt hope because more doctors finally believed in my disease. I felt hope that someday, other PANDA’s from my hometown wouldn’t have to travel to out-of-town specialists for treatment—someday our own “world-class” hospital might treat more of us. Most of all, I felt hope that I had finally found the treatment that would bring me back the rest of the way…

Ever since I came out of surgery, I haven’t had a single tic.  The day before, I’d developed two new vocal tics that got more and more disruptive as the day went on.  I know—tics usually increase with anxiety.  But why have I also found myself suddenly carrying out fewer and fewer compulsions this week—and not getting extremely anxious over not doing them?

As always, there are a lot of variables at work.  Still, I can’t deny that, aside from a sore, gnarly-looking throat and fatigue from leftover anesthesia, I’m feeling great in every other way.  (And I’m not in nearly as much pain as people tried to scare me into thinking I’d be in.)  To me, what happened this week is a good enough reason to keep hoping for continuing progress.

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